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Latest World news news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
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1. Ruth Bader Ginsburg's trademark collar dominates week of tributes22:31[−]

Death of late supreme court justice has given rise to an outpouring of creative tributes

Tributes to the late supreme court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg have been dominated by one feature: a white lace collar on a black background.

On social media, there are photographs of pets in fancy collars, “dissent collar” pumpkins and statues of girls wearing collars.

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2. Coronavirus live news: 2 million could die before vaccine ready, warns WHO; cases surge in Europe22:30[−]

WHO warns death toll could be higher than 2 million without concerted action; Madrid braces for lockdown as Spain reaches 716,481 total infections; surge in cases in Athens

A single dose of Johnson & Johnson’s experimental Covid-19 vaccine produced a strong immune response against coronavirus in an early to mid stage clinical trial, according to interim results.

The vaccine, Ad26.COV2.S, was equally well tolerated at two different doses, the results showed. A single shot versus a rival two-dose approach being tested by Moderna and Pfizer could simplify distribution of the vaccine.

After 127 students at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK tested positive for coronavirus, a local lockdown for student accommodation at the Birley campus and Cambridge Halls has been implemented.

All students in the accommodation will be instructed to self-isolate for 14 days even if they have no symptoms. Medical, welfare and emotional wellbeing support will be put in place for them.

“We have seen an increase in positive cases and students with symptoms in the university and all students in these accommodation blocks are being asked to self-isolate for 14 days, even if they have no symptoms, to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus.

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3. Croydon police shooting: officer named as Matiu Ratana22:04[−]

Long-serving Metropolitan police officer described as ‘an inspiration’

Police have named the officer killed at Croydon police station as Matiu Ratana.

The 54-year-old officer, known as Matt, had served with the Metropolitan police for nearly 30 years, according to his social media pages.

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4. Covid figures prompt French and Dutch warnings, and deepening row in Spain21:58[−]

Coronavirus cases in France jump to record high as Spanish government calls for Madrid lockdown

The prime ministers of France and the Netherlands have issued stark warnings about their coronavirus figures, while in Spain, the western European country hardest hit by the virus, Madrid authorities have rejected the central government’s call for a lockdown across the capital.

Sant? Publique France, the French public health authority, tallied 15,797 new confirmed cases on Friday, just shy of a daily record of 16,096 set on Thursday.

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5. 'I hope you never know the pain': Breonna Taylor's family condemn Louisville police – video21:51[−]

The family of Breonna Taylor heavily criticised Daniel Cameron, Kentucky’s attorney general, after a grand jury decided not to charge three police officers directly in the killing of the 26-year-old medical worker.

'I am an angry black woman,' Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, said in a statement read by her sister, Bianca Austin. 'Angry because our black women keep dying at the hands of police officers'.

The family's attorney, Benjamin Crump, called on Cameron to release the transcripts of the grand jury.

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6. Two injured in knife attack outside Charlie Hebdo's former offices in Paris20:12[−]

Two arrested and counter-terrorism investigation launched after incident

A counter-terrorism investigation has been launched in France after two people were seriously injured in a knife attack in front of the former offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris.

Two arrests have been made and the victims’ lives were not in danger, authorities said.

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7. Britain has offensive cyberwar capability, top general admits20:00[−]

Gen Sir Patrick Sanders says Boris Johnson has told him to ensure UK is major cyber power

Britain’s most senior cyber general has said the UK possesses the capacity to “degrade, disrupt and destroy” its enemies’ critical infrastructure in a future cyber conflict, in a rare acknowledgement of the military’s offensive hacking capability.

Gen Sir Patrick Sanders, who heads the UK’s strategic command, said that he been told by Boris Johnson to ensure Britain is a “leading, full-spectrum cyber power” able both to defend against – and carry out – hacking attacks.

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8. Dorm snitches and party bans: how universities around the world are tackling Covid19:47[−]

From asking students to report illicit gatherings to expanded online teaching, educational institutions continue to adapt

From overcrowded lecture halls in France to a ban on sleepovers in Ireland, special coronavirus apps in the UK, snitching on dorm parties in the US and shuttered campus gates in India, students face a range of experiences when – or if – universities reopen.

Authorities around the world have introduced different measures to try to balance the needs of third-level education with those of public health amid an autumnal surge in Covid-19 infections. Students will encounter new rules, tensions and scrutiny in response to fears that universities and colleges will open the pandemic’s floodgates.

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9. Brexit: Brussels punctures optimism that deal is in sight19:44[−]

EU sources fear Boris Johnson hasn’t yet got backing for compromises on state aid to business

Brussels has sought to puncture an outbreak of optimism over an imminent Brexit deal, amid fears Boris Johnson has not secured the backing of key advisers and his party for the compromises needed in the final stretch of negotiations.

With the UK government yet to offer a way forward on the most contentious issues, and trust in Downing Street at a low ebb, senior EU officials treated with scepticism reports that the UK could see a way to secure a deal.

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10. The $80m Botticelli: could its auction trigger a Covid-rescue fire sale?19:43[−]

If the Renaissance artist’s wavy-haired youth can fetch $80m, will collections start selling off masterpieces to get them through the pandemic? Could the RA’s Michelangelo be next?

There’s money in those Renaissance hills. The Royal Academy can sniff it. Confronted with a huge pandemic deficit that may mean sacking 150 workers, some Academicians have reportedly headed up to the cobwebby attic – or rather Norman Foster’s Sackler Galleries – to put a price on their most precious heirloom. “A hundred million pounds,” they whisper. So should the RA sell The Virgin and Child With the Infant St John – Michelangelo’s poetically unfinished marble relief and the only stone sculpture of his that Britain has – to save jobs and secure the Academy’s future?

Actually, ?100m may be way too low a figure – because, as the RA has doubtless noticed, Sotheby’s has just estimated a portrait by Michelangelo’s fellow Florentine Sandro Botticelli will shortly fetch at least $80m (?63m) at auction in New York. There is clearly a huge leap in preciousness between Young Man Holding a Roundel, as Botticelli’s lovely painting is called, to a sculpture that’s not only by Michelangelo’s hand but even has his chisel marks all over it. Yes, Michelangelo’s chisel, held and hammered by him, a year or so after he finished David. Gotta be worth something.

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11. Coalminer's daughter comes out top in Afghanistan's university entrance exam19:24[−]
  • Shamsia Alizada, 18, first out of more than 170,000 students
  • Government in talks with Taliban, which barred girls in schools

The daughter of an Afghan coalminer has come top in the country’s university entrance exam and is setting her sights on becoming a doctor.

Shamsia Alizada, 18, came first out of more than 170,000 students, the education ministry said, prompting congratulations from former president Hamid Karzai and foreign envoys including the US charge d’affaires.

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12. Ruth Bader Ginsburg's personal trainer performs push-ups in front of casket – video19:09[−]

Bryant Johnson, the trainer who led Ruth Bader Ginsburg through her well-documented workout regime, paid his respects by performing three press-ups as she lay in state at the US Capitol. Ginsburg, who died on 18 September, is the first woman and the first Jewish person to receive the honour

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13. Argentinian politician quits after kissing partner's breasts in online legislative session18:28[−]
  • Juan Carlos Ameri initially claimed he thought he was offline
  • Moment went out on lower congressional house’s YouTube

A legislator in Argentina’s lower house of congress has been forced to resign after he was seen kissing his girlfriend’s bare breasts during an online congressional debate.

Related: ‘We’re suddenly drowning in people’: Argentinians flock to Uruguay amid pandemic

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14. 'Any breed could do it': dogs might be a Covid tester's best friend18:10[−]

Researchers around the world are training canines to sniff out the virus – could they be deployed for mass testing?

It is simple and pain-free, could be used to test for coronavirus in care homes, airports and schools, and might just be more realistic than the UK government’s ?100bn “Operation Moonshoot” mass screening plan. Its name? Fido.

Around the world – from the UK to Finland, Spain, Brazil, Lebanon and Australia – teams of researchers are training dogs to sniff out Covid-19. And some say the idea of training hundreds of thousands of canine noses to check for coronavirus is not as far-fetched as it may sound.

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15. UK scientists begin study of how long Covid can survive in the air18:06[−]

Researchers will test length of time virus stays infectious in different climatic conditions

It is the question scientists around the world are trying to answer: how long can the coronavirus survive in the tiny aerosol particles we exhale? In a high-security lab near Bristol, entered through a series of airlock doors, scientists may be weeks from finding out.

On Monday, they will start launching tiny droplets of live Sars-CoV-2 and levitating them between two electric rings to test how long the airborne virus remains infectious under different environmental conditions.

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16. Pro-EU theme park Mini-Europe to close its doors thanks to coronavirus18:02[−]

Closure of miniature attraction is blow to Brussels, which likes to style itself as the capital of Europe

When it opened in Brussels 31 years ago, many said a tourist attraction about European integration would never work. Now Mini-Europe – a collection of miniature landmarks and probably the only theme park in the world dedicated to the European Union – is closing its doors.

Earlier this month, owner and director, Thierry Mee?s, announced he had failed to reach agreement with landlords Brussels Expo, despite promising “major investment”. In a statement released last week, he said the Covid-19 crisis had “spared no one”, leaving him no other choice but to close on 31 December 2020.

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17. Chinese fishing flotilla nears Peruvian waters, prompting US-Beijing spat17:57[−]
  • Huge armada moves from Gal?pagos Islands towards Peru
  • China rejects US embassy insinuation of overfishing

A huge fishing armada of Chinese vessels has moved south from the Gal?pagos Islands towards Peru’s territorial waters, dragging the South American country into a diplomatic Twitter row between Washington and Beijing.

Related: 'They just pull up everything!' Chinese fleet raises fears for Gal?pagos sea life

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18. US military increasingly using drone missile with flying blades in Syria17:52[−]

‘Ninja bomb’, which uses 100lb of dense material and six attached blades, has been deployed in targeted assassinations

The US military is making increasing use in Syria of a gruesome and secretive non-explosive drone missile that deploys flying blades to kill its targets.

Described as less likely to kill non-combatants, the so-called ninja bomb – whose development was first disclosed last year – has been used a number of times in the last year to kill militants in Syria, including those linked to aal-Qaida, most recently earlier this month.

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19. Hilary Mantel: I am 'disappointed but freed' by Booker decision17:37[−]

Two-time winner, previously a favourite to win with the third novel in her Thomas Cromwell trilogy, says books ‘surf on the tide of the times’

Two-time Booker prize winner Hilary Mantel has said that she is “disappointed” but “freed” after not making this year’s shortlist, congratulating the six authors now in competition for the ?50,000 prize.

Mantel, who won the prize for the first two novels in her historical trilogy about Thomas Cromwell, had been tipped to win a third time for the final volume, The Mirror and the Light. But judges for this year’s prize instead selected four debuts, by Diane Cook, Avni Doshi, Douglas Stuart and Brandon Taylor alongside new novels from Tsitsi Dangarembga and Maaza Mengiste. After announcing the lineup, judge and novelist Lee Child said The Mirror and the Light was “an absolutely wonderful novel, there’s no question about it”, but “as good as it was, there were some books which were better”.

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20. UK government sourcing NHS PPE from company repeatedly accused of forced labour16:36[−]

Exclusive: Gloves from Malaysian company Top Glove found in NHS supply chain despite multiple allegations of worker exploitation

The UK government has been continuing to source medical gloves used as PPE by frontline healthcare workers from a manufacturer in Malaysia repeatedly accused of forcing its workers to endure “slave-like conditions” in its factories, the Guardian can reveal.

Top Glove, the world’s biggest producer of rubber medical gloves, has faced multiple allegations of exploitation from migrant workers mostly from Bangladesh and Nepal.

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21. Scott Morrison to tell United Nations that if Australia finds Covid vaccine 'we will share it'15:30[−]

The prime minister warns nations will be severely judged if they try to profit from hoarding a vaccine

Scott Morrison will use a speech to the United Nations general assembly in New York to urge countries to share a Covid-19 vaccine as soon as a successful candidate emerges, characterising such collaboration as a “global and moral responsibility”.

Morrison will use his contribution to the general assembly 75th anniversary general debate, scheduled for Saturday morning Australian time, to revive concerns that some countries might see “short-term advantage or even profit” in hoarding the vaccine rather than sharing it with the world.

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22. Masked Spanish councillor's English accent proves to be a dub misstep – video14:03[−]

A councillor from Valencia surprised listeners with a minute-long speech in stunningly fluent English and without the slightest trace of a Spanish accent for the city's bid to become the European Capital of Innovation 2020, an honour later awarded to Leuven in Belgium.

Carlos Galiana was being live-dubbed by a native English speaker – with a noticeable regional accent. The Spanish newspaper El Espa?ol reported the council did not have an interpreter stand next to Galiana because of strict commission instructions

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23. Ugandan lawmakers reject plan for Murchison Falls hydropower dam13:49[−]

Activists praise decision to reject energy ministry’s proposal to dam the world-famous waterfall

Conservationists in Uganda have hailed a bipartisan decision to reject the government’s plan to construct a hydro-power dam at the country’s biggest tourist attraction.

Lawmakers unanimously adopted a report by the 28 member parliamentary committee on environment on Thursday, rejecting the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development proposal to build a 360MW at Uhuru Falls on Murchison Falls national park.

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24. Inside a Welsh ICU during the coronavirus pandemic – photo essay13:46[−]

Consultant and photographer Nick Mason shares his experience and that of colleagues at the Royal Gwent hospital in Newport, offering a unique perspective documenting the impact of Covid-19 on the NHS frontline

Humankind cannot bear very much reality.” TS Eliot, Burnt Norton

Human memory is fickle. Only a few brief months ago, many intensive care units (ICUs) across Britain came close to being overwhelmed by patients with a novel coronavirus, unknown to medicine before January of this year, and causing potentially life-threatening lung disease in up to 20% of those it infects. With the relaxation of the lockdown, however – only possible because it had been so effective – and the good summer weather in which we have been encouraged by Westminster to eat, drink and be merry, we have begun to forget. We have rapidly forgotten the fear and anxiety that rightly held Britain in their grip throughout the spring of 2020, the 40,000 people who died from a single infectious disease within a few brief months and the incalculable suffering caused to their families. We have forgotten that more than 600 health and social care workers died as a result of their work caring for others.

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25. Breonna Taylor protesters march in Louisville as state representative among dozens arrested – video11:18[−]

Protesters marched and chanted Breonna Taylor's name for a second night in Louisville, Kentucky, on Thursday – after a grand jury decided no police officer would be charged directly with her death in March.

On Thursday night, police made several arrests, including the Kentucky state representative, Attica Scott, a Democrat who has called for justice for Taylor, who shot dead in a botched raid

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26. 'Money is worth nothing now': how Lebanon is finding a future in farming09:15[−]

With food in short supply and prices rocketing, a wave of new farmers are growing produce on roofs, balconies and beyond

  • All photographs by Jenny Gustafsson

On the side of the Baanoub valley in southern Lebanon, half an hour’s drive from the coast, Yasmina Zahar stands surrounded by olive trees with thick, sturdy trunks. Planted in Roman times, once tended by monks, they are now cared for by Zahar and her husband, Jean-Pierre, who also grow vegetables, fruit and flowers.

“It’s beautiful to see the result of what you produce, to hold it in your hands and taste it,” she says.

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27. 'Who wants to see a man?' Trump promises to name supreme court nominee on Saturday – video08:27[−]

President Donald Trump says he will reveal his nominee to fill the vacant US supreme court seat this Saturday and promises it will be a woman, following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsberg. Speaking at an election rally in Jacksonville, Florida, Trump told the crowd he aimed to fill the seat before the November election. Despite promising his nominee would be female, the president played to the crowd, asking the assembled audience: ‘Who would rather see a man?’

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28. Should men-only private members' clubs still exist?05:00[−]

The Garrick Club was founded in 1831 – a place where ‘actors and men of refinement and education might meet on equal terms’. Women were not allowed to be members and, almost 200 years on, that is still the case. Emily Bendell on why she is taking legal action against the Garrick and Amy Milne-Smith on the history of London’s clubland

Last year, businesswoman Emily Bendell was looking for a private members’ club where she could meet people after work and was surprised to discover that a number of clubs in central London still exclude women. She tells Mythili Rao why she has launched legal action against one of London’s last remaining gentlemen’s clubs, the Garrick, arguing that its men-only membership rules are a breach of equality legislation.

Mythili also talks to historian Amy Milne-Smith, author of London Clubland: A Cultural History of Gender and Class in late-Victorian Britain, about how these clubs first came into existence. She looks at the type of men who wanted to be members and why there has been a resurgence in popularity of these clubs. Is it escapism and nostalgia that is driving this?

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29. New Zealand is in a 'shecession' – so where is the much-needed 'she-covery'? | Claire Robinson03:23[−]

Both major parties are pinning their hopes on jobs for the boys to lead the post-coronavirus economic recovery

Some may have heard the terms “ shecession” or “pink recession”; words associated with the worldwide trend for pandemic-related job and income losses to affect women more than men. In New Zealand, we saw it in the June quarter unemployment figures. Ninety percent of the 11,000 New Zealanders who had at lost their jobs due to Covid-19 were women.

These statistics were shocking but perhaps not surprising. New Zealand’s early pandemic response was gendered when it came to which industries were, and weren’t, considered “essential”. In the highest alert levels (3 and 4) work in the personal care industries (hairdressers, manicurists, beauticians, domestic cleaners, personal trainers, gymnasiums) – largely done by women – was not allowed. Business owners and workers in these industries were told they could not offer services which involved face-to-face or sustained close personal contact; the risk of Covid transmission was too great.

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30. What's missing from the chancellor's new scheme to save jobs?Чт, 24 сен[−]

Five measures absent from the chancellor’s winter economy plan

Rishi Sunak’s winter economy plan prioritises additional support for “viable” jobs. However, critics have warned that other measures are still needed to help people who have already lost their jobs or will lose them despite the new government scheme.

Here are five measures that could help keep workers in jobs, but were missing from the chancellor’s winter economy plan:

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31. 'Vote him out': Trump booed while paying respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg – videoЧт, 24 сен[−]

Donald Trump was loudly booed by crowds as he visited the supreme court to pay his respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the late justice and liberal icon who died last week aged 87.

As the president and the first lady paused at Ginsburg’s casket, the crowd yelled: 'Vote him out!' Ginsburg is the first woman in history to lie in state in the US Capitol

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32. El Salvador woman freed after six years in jail following stillbirthЧт, 24 сен[−]

Cindy Erazo was accused of aggravated homicide after an obstetric emergency

A woman sentenced to 30 years in jail after a stillbirth that was judged to be her fault has been released from jail in El Salvador.

Cindy Erazo, 29, from San Salvador, was granted conditional freedom on Wednesday after six years in jail.

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33. Jerusalema: dance craze brings hope from Africa to the world amid CovidЧт, 24 сен[−]

South African music track and dance steps created in Angola have caught the imagination of politicians, priests and millions more

A song from South Africa that has gone around the world and been endorsed by presidents and priests has become the sound of the pandemic for millions across southern Africa.

Last week the Jerusalema dance challenge was endorsed by President Cyril Ramaphosa ahead of the country’s plan to open up to tourism on 1 October.

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34. England's Covid restrictions: the 'rule of sex' and other quirksЧт, 24 сен[−]

Despite government’s efforts, rules for Covid-safe behaviour are far from simple

The longer the coronavirus lockdown lasts, the more complex the suite of rules governing everyday behaviour seemingly become, despite the government’s efforts to simplify matters with the rule of six.

A new set of restrictions was unveiled on Tuesday, with the full regulations due to be published later on Wednesday. Here are some nuances and quirks to have emerged so far. These apply only to the default rules for England; they differ in other UK nations and where stricter local lockdowns are in force.

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35. Female voices 'drowned out' in reporting on Covid-19, report findsЧт, 24 сен[−]

Analysis of stories across six countries including UK found fewer than a fifth of experts quoted on the pandemic were women

Women’s voices have been “worryingly marginalised” in reporting of the coronavirus, partly due to the war-like framing of the pandemic, according to a report analysing stories across six countries.

Each woman’s voice in news coverage of the crisis is “drowned out” by at least three men, it said.

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36. Saudi heir and Jared Kushner inch kingdom towards deal with IsraelЧт, 24 сен[−]

Saudi Arabia’s interventions could result in seismic shift in region’s geopolitics

As the UAE and Bahrain prepared to sign a deal to normalise diplomatic relations with Israel this summer, Saudi Arabia – the regional heavyweight – was quietly urging them on.

For several months before the deals were signed at the White House, the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, had been laying out his rationale for a pact that would overturn regional policies towards a long-term foe.

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