The Guardian21:54 Текст источника в новой вкладке
Latest news, sport, business, comment, analysis and reviews from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2019

 
 
1. Man injured after car drives through crowd at Irish cemetery21:29[−]

One man taken to hospital and another man arrested after incident at service in Dundalk

A man was seriously injured when a car drove at speed through a cemetery while thousands of people were attending an annual blessing of the graves service in Ireland.

Police said a man aged in his 20s believed to be the driver was arrested at the scene at St Patrick’s cemetery in Dundalk, Co Louth, on Sunday afternoon.

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2. Dina Asher-Smith proud to finish second in 100m final in quality field21:19[−]

• Asher-Smith lost out to Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
• Lynsey Sharp and men’s 4x100m relay excelled in victory

Dina Asher-Smith was given a close-up view of what it will take to become a true sprint champion as she lost the 100m final at the Anniversary Games to Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. Asher-Smith was the undoubted draw of this two-day event, but the 23-year-old was forced to settle for second place someway behind the double Olympic champion, who left a strong field trailing in her wake.

There were some notable British successes on the second day of this weekend?long competition, including Lynsey Sharp winning the women’s 800m and a world?leading time in the men’s 4x100m relay. There were shocks, too, in the women’s 5,000m and men’s 110m hurdles. In a programme of uneven quality that served mainly as a marker for the upcoming world championships in Doha, there were also some damp squibs.

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3. Avengers: Endgame tops Avatar to be highest grossing film21:16[−]

Marvel Studios sequel has earned $3bn since its release in April, breaking 10-year record

Avengers: Endgame has surpassed Avatar to become the highest-grossing film of all time.

The Marvel Studios sequel, directed by Anthony and Joe Russo, earned over ?2.3bn ($2.9bn) in revenue by Sunday, since being released in April. Avatar, directed by James Cameron, which was released in 2009, previously held the record as the highest grossing movie of all time , earning $2.79bn.

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4. New Zealand beat Australia 52-51 to win Netball World Cup – as it happened21:08[−]

Maria Folau and Ameliaranne Ekanasio starred as the Silver Ferns withstood a late Australia fightback to win their first world title for 16 years

New Zealand collect the trophy as the ticker tape flies. Time for me to sign off, but keep your eyes peeled for Erin’s report shortly – here’s a PA take for the time being. Thanks for joining me, and congratulations New Zealand.

New Zealand held off an Australian fightback to win their first Netball World Cup since 2003 with a dramatic 52-51 triumph in Liverpool.

There are tears from the Australians as they finally get their silver medals. That’s a long time to stand and wait for a medal you don’t really want. Emotions are running high among the Silver Ferns too, as they collect gold medals that seemed a world away on the Gold Coast last year.

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5. Australia retain Women’s Ashes after drawn Test with England20:41[−]

• Australia 420-8dec & 230-7, England 275-9dec
• Ellyse Perry 76 not out in Australia’s second innings

Australia have retained the Women’s Ashes after the only Test match of the series ended in a draw at Taunton.

The visitors chose to bat out the afternoon after England avoided the follow-on and declared on 275 for nine but they were unable to take the necessary wickets needed to bat again.

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6. Ben Jennings on rising tensions between Iran and the west – cartoon20:41[−]
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7. Boris Johnson's Brexit plans under threat from ministers' resignations20:36[−]

Likely new PM could find no-deal option thwarted by senior Tories such as Philip Hammond

Boris Johnson’s hoped-for triumphant march into Downing Street this week is set to be dampened by a carefully timed series of resignations by senior ministers, who will retreat to the backbenches with a vow to thwart any moves towards a no-deal Brexit.

The announcements by Philip Hammond and David Gauke that they will step down on Wednesday, immediately before Johnson is likely to head to Buckingham Palace, highlight the perilous political climate for Theresa May’s expected successor.

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8. Firefighters battle wildfires sweeping parts of central Portugal20:30[−]

About 1,800 firefighters struggle to contain blazes that have injured at least 20 people

About 1,800 firefighters have been struggling to contain wildfires in central Portugal that have injured 20 people, including eight firefighters.

The fires broke out on Saturday across three fronts in the district of Castelo Branco, about 125 miles (200km) north-east of Lisbon, Portugal’s civil protection agency said.

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9. MPs must find the courage to stop a mindless no-deal Brexit | Gordon Brown20:16[−]
A new poll reveals how fearful the British public is about the likely economic shock. They are right to be worried

There can be no better illustration of the disconnect between the people and the Tory leadership than its wilful ignorance of the sheer scale of the growing countrywide opposition to its mindless stampede towards a no-deal Brexit. A poll by Hope Not Hate released on Monday will show that, by a margin of two to one, British people think that the economy, their families’ economic prospects, inward investment into the UK and even their exposure to terrorism will take a turn for the worse if we crash out of the European Union on 31 October. Only 17% of women think no deal would be good for Britain.

Related: Keir Starmer seeks alliance against no-deal Brexit with Tory ex-ministers

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10. Ireland’s Shane Lowry stays calm to win first major at the Open as rivals fade20:12[−]
• 32-year-old becomes latest Open champion from Ireland
• England’s Tommy Fleetwood finishes second on nine under

Padraig Harrington, Graeme McDowell, Rory McIlroy, Darren Clarke … Shane Lowry. We will soon have to amend the great book of Irish cliche to include reference to golf. This small island has now returned 10 major victories in the last 12 years.

Lowry’s procession towards the Claret Jug, as the wind howled and rain battered Royal Portrush, really was the stuff of dreams. He walked to the 18th tee on Sunday evening knowing he could take nine and still win. On the Open’s first departure from the UK mainland since 1951, in the country where golf has always been afforded a united front as division defined so much else, the man from County Offaly refused to wilt.

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11. Iran is raising the stakes. But the UK can help to calm this crisis | Sanam Vakil20:06[−]
The seizure of a British tanker is inextricably linked to US pressure on Tehran. Negotiation, not sanctions, is the answer

It was like something out of a movie. To shouts of Allahu Akbar!, masked soldiers drop down ropes from a military helicopter on to a British oil tanker while Iranian navy speedboats surround the vessel. By radio, a voice warns the ship’s captain in English: “If you obey you will be safe”. There is no doubt that the Friday seizure by Iranian Revolutionary Guards of a British-flagged tanker, the Stena Impero, was in part a piece of theatre intended to appease domestic clamour for Tehran to assert itself. It came in response to the UK military’s 4 July detention of an Iranian tanker, the Grace 1, in Gibraltar, allegedly for shipping oil to Syria in breach of EU sanctions. But the tit-for-tat response should also be evaluated as part of the Iranian attempt to push back against Donald Trump’s unilateral abandonment of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, and his reimposition of economic sanctions.

Related: UK defence minister rebuffs criticism over tanker seized in Gulf

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12. Imran Khan hopes to win over Donald Trump in first US visit20:02[−]

Pakistani PM in Washington seeking concessions on military aid and sanctions

Imran Khan will meet Donald Trump on his first visit to Washington as Pakistan’s prime minister, burdened by the task of trying to mend relations mired in mutual distrust and restoring financial support cut off by the US president.

The US has suspended most of its military aid, worth $300m (?240m), after Trump accused Pakistan of not doing enough to fight extremism.

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13. Anti-extremism software to be used to tackle vaccine disinformation19:55[−]

Redirection tool that confronts anti-vax theories under development by UK’s Moonshot

Technology used to counter violent messages online from Islamic State and the far right is being adapted to counter the spread of “anti-vax” conspiracy theories.

Moonshot CVE, a company currently working in as many as 28 countries, uses techniques to identify and intervene in the cases of internet users at risk of being radicalised online. Its technology has already been deployed to counter the KKK in the US, Isis and the far right in Europe.

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14. Trump renews racist attack on Squad: 'They're not capable of loving the US'19:53[−]

The furore over Donald Trump’s racist slurs against four Democratic congresswomen intensified on Sunday, as the president resumed attacking them and posting far-right material online.

Related: 'It's a political civil war': Trump's racist tirades set tone for 2020

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15. Nadler: Mueller has evidence of Trump high crimes and misdemeanours19:32[−]

The eyes of America will be trained on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, as Robert Mueller testifies before two House committees about his report on Russian election interference, links between the Trump campaign and Moscow and potential obstruction of justice by the president.

Related: 'It's a political civil war': Trump's racist tirades set tone for 2020

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16. Support for women who are afraid to say no | Letter19:26[−]
The #MeToo movement is bringing women’s experiences into the light and providing some backing for those who have been abused, says Rowan Ferguson

As a single woman who worked as a sexual health adviser in the NHS for almost 20 years, off and on, I would like to commend Ellie Mae O’Hagan for her insightful piece on consent ( No wonder women are still afraid to say no, Journal, 18 July).

In a culture that is noticeably sexualised, where hardcore porn is easily available and shared by young people via their phones, with no regard for “parental control”, the “world where women are afraid to say no” is indeed a reality.

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17. Leeds comeback comes to nothing as Hull have the last word19:18[−]
• Leeds Rhinos 24-26 Hull FC
• Ratu Naulago’s late try proves decisive for Hull

With six rounds to go the intense drama of the Super League relegation battle shows no sign of letting up – much to the chagrin of anyone associated with Leeds Rhinos.

At various junctures this season the eight-times Super League champions have lured their fans into believing brighter times lay ahead. There was even one such example here on Sunday in West Yorkshire.

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18. Young Associates / National Youth Dance Company review – the future is cooking19:07[−]

Sadler’s Wells, London
There are plenty of ideas and energy in this showcase for young choreographers and dancers, with scope to hone skills further

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When in need of hope, it’s common to look to the young. You’ll find the next generation of choreographers and dancers in two laudable initiatives from Sadler’s Wells: the Young Associates, four choreographers in their early 20s; and the ambitious National Youth Dance Company, all aged 15 to 24, here performing Madhead by 27-year-old Botis Seva. Look at the dance they produce and it’s clear these young people have a message, but that message seems to be: we’re doomed. Hope, schmope.

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19. Catalonia plans to introduce outdoor smoking ban18:59[−]

Proposed changes would outlaw smoking outside bars and restaurants, in sports grounds and cars

Smoking is set to be banned on the outdoor terraces of bars and restaurants in Catalonia as well as in bus shelters and on train platforms, under proposals from the region’s health authority.

The ban would also extend to open-air sports facilities and inside cars.

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20. Jeremy Corbyn apologises for ‘hurt’ to Jewish people18:59[−]

Leader admits Labour slow to act on antisemitism cases as he launches educational webpage

Jeremy Corbyn has apologised for the “hurt” caused to Jewish people as the Labour party launched an educational webpage about antisemitism.

Corbyn said the party had a “real problem” with anti-Jewish racism and it had been too slow in processing disciplinary cases.

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21. C?sar Pelli obituary18:54[−]
Distinguished architect who designed the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and One Canada Square in London

C?sar Pelli will be remembered as a designer of world-beating skyscrapers, but for him the quality of his projects was more important than their height. The Argentinian-American architect, who has died aged 92, is best known for the towering landmarks he added to the skylines around the world: the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (formerly the world’s tallest building), One Canada Square in London, the World Financial Center in New York, the Torre de Cristal in Madrid, the Gran Torre Santiago in the Chilean capital, the International Finance Centre in Hong Kong, and the Salesforce Tower in San Francisco.

Many of those structures are the among the tallest in their respective city or country, but Pelli preferred to judge his own work in more abstract terms: the emotional responses they generated, the clarity and economy of their designs, and their contribution to their cities as visual symbols, as spaces rather than objects. At the opening of One Canada Square, he quoted the Chinese philosopher Laozi: “The reality of a hollow object is in the void and not in the walls that define it.”

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22. Old men by the sea: Tennessee banker takes Hemingway lookalike contest18:38[−]
  • Joe Maxey, 68, beats 141 other author impersonators
  • Long-running event shows importance of being Ernest

A retired banker from Tennessee beat 141 other white-bearded contenders to win the coveted Ernest Hemingway Look-Alike Contest in Key West, Florida, on Saturday, at the eighth attempt.

Related: The husband also rises: Mr Paula Deen wins Hemingway lookalike contest

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23. Thomas profits from Alaphilippe’s late struggle as Simon Yates wins stage 1518:23[−]
• Thibaut Pinot makes attack to cut into Frenchman’s lead
• Thomas happy to gain time back on Alaphilippe on final climb

Thibaut Pinot exploded the status quo in the Tour de France, blowing both Geraint Thomas and Julian Alaphilippe off his back wheel in the Pyrenean mist, as Simon Yates took his second stage win at the summit finish to stage 15 at Foix Prat d’Albis.

Pinot’s attack, six kilometres from the rain-drenched finish line, immediately put Thomas into trouble, with only his Ineos team mate Egan Bernal and the race leader Alaphilippe able to follow. But Pinot’s further accelerations distanced both riders and cut into his time deficit in the overall standings to both Thomas and his fellow Frenchman.

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24. Senior doctors call for crackdown on home genetic testing kits18:07[−]

False results have told women they have mutations linked to breast and ovarian cancer

Senior doctors have called for a crackdown on consumer genetic tests, following an influx of patients who have been wrongly told they are carrying dangerous mutations linked to cancer or other devastating conditions.

Women have been incorrectly informed by companies that they have faulty BRCA genes, which convey a high risk of breast and ovarian cancers. One patient was scheduled for preventive breast-removal surgery after a consumer genetic test suggested she had a BRCA mutation. The surgery was called off at the last moment when an NHS laboratory revealed the result to be a false positive.

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25. Five ways to minimise jet lag18:00[−]

There is no way to prevent the condition – but pre-empting the time difference, avoiding alcohol and exposing yourself to natural light can help reduce its effects

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26. Police and protesters clash amid huge democracy march in Hong Kong17:59[−]

Riot police fire teargas after protesters ignore orders to restrict rally boundaries

Police and demonstrators have clashed after hundreds of thousands of anti-government protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday in the city’s largest demonstration in recent weeks.

Riot police armed with batons and shields fired teargas to disperse the crowd as protesters ran toward officers who tried to push them back from a main road in the western district near Beijing’s liaison office with the city. One demonstrator threw a bottle at police. Officers advanced on the crowd, setting off smoke bombs.

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27. Brexit party activist says he obtained Kim Darroch cables17:39[−]

Steven Edginton says his name was left out of original story to avoid ‘possible controversy’

New questions have emerged over leaks of confidential UK diplomatic cables criticising Donald Trump after a 19-year-old Brexit activist was revealed to be the person who obtained them.

In a lengthy feature in the Mail on Sunday, Steven Edginton, who describes himself as a freelance journalist and who since April has worked for the Brexit party, said he was passed Sir Kim Darroch’s briefings on the White House.

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28. Latitude festival accused of cruelty over pink sheep stunt17:32[−]

Animal rights campaigners attack advert showing dyed sheep running across grounds

Animal rights organisations and activists have accused the Latitude festival organisers of cruelty for dyeing a flock of sheep pink as part of a marketing campaign.

A promotional tweet posted on the opening day of the Suffolk event showed fuchsia-dyed sheep running across the festival grounds. Social media users quickly criticised the organisers for dyeing the sheep and demanded an explanation.

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29. Private firms given ?9.2bn of NHS budget despite Hancock promise17:27[−]

Record 2018 total comes after health secretary pledged no privatisation on his watch

The amount of the NHS budget going to private healthcare firms has reached unprecedented levels, despite the health secretary’s pledge to roll back outsourcing of patient care.

The Department of Health and Social Care handed a record total of ?9.2bn last year to private providers such as Virgin Care and the Priory mental health group, its annual report shows.

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30. How to practise good post-sex hygiene17:00[−]

To steer clear of infection, use a condom, avoid harsh soaps and douching, and empty your bladder within 15 minutes of intercourse

The most important rule for any sexually active woman is to empty their bladder within 15 minutes of sex. Whether it is same-sex, with a sex toy or heterosexual intercourse, unless you empty your bladder you are more likely to get a urinary tract infection (UTI), which can be very uncomfortable and can lead to bigger problems. The reason that women get UTIs after sex is that the urethra is very short and the bladder is close to it, so during penetrative sex you are allowing bacteria direct access to your bladder.

We don’t know why some people are more susceptible to UTIs than others, but post-menopausal women should be extra-careful, because as a reduction in oestrogen leads to the tissue being thinner, making it harder to fight infection. Even if your partner is a clean person you are still at risk; using a condom or being circumcised doesn’t make a difference. Penetrative sex upsets the natural balance of your body so always make sure to go to the bathroom afterwards.

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31. In brief: The Hiding Game; Passionate Spirit; The Trick to Time – reviews17:00[−]
A tale of obsessive love set during the turmoil of 1920s Germany, the creative life of Alma Mahler, and the story of a woman tackling her troubled past

Naomi Wood
Picador, ?14.99, pp352

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32. Lights, camera, caption! Why subtitles are no longer just for the hard of hearing17:00[−]

An enormous number of people with unimpaired hearing are choosing to watch with words. Why? And is it time captions became the norm?

‘Subtitles aren’t just for deaf people,” read the tweet that started it all. “Lots of my hearing friends use them, too. If you’re hearing and using subtitles on Netflix and TV, and would quite like them at the cinema, please retweet to help normalise their presence!”

This recent post by @deafgirly (AKA Deafinitely Girly) swiftly garnered close to 75,000 likes and a deluge of replies. “I was confused at first when I saw it had gone viral,” says the 30-year-old blogger and campaigner from London, who prefers to go by her Twitter name. “I was out for lunch with my mum and my phone started going crazy. I was really pleased though, because there was overwhelming global support from people of all ages for subtitles. Even the people who said they didn’t really like them at the cinema said they’d tolerate them if it meant deaf people could attend more screenings.” One woman even told DG she used subtitles when she was too stoned to listen to her favourite shows.

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33. Surge in youth prison violence sparks call to close institutions17:00[−]

Government accused of failing to address crisis after big rise in assaults on staff and inmates

Assaults in youth prisons in England and Wales have risen by almost two-thirds over the last five years, a Guardian analysis has found.

Prisoner-on-prisoner assaults rose by 43% and assaults on staff more than doubled, prompting fears the government is failing to respond to a growing crisis in youth prisons.

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34. Young boxing fans and New York heatwave: Sunday's best photos16:56[−]

The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world

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35. French inventor to attempt to cross Channel on jet-powered flyboard16:44[−]

‘Flying soldier’ Franky Zapata expects to cross from France to England in 20 minutes

A former jetski champion and French military reservist who became known as the “flying soldier” after he invented a jet-powered hoverboard will attempt to cross the Channel this week.

Franky Zapata, who impressed France with a demonstration of his flyboard at this year’s Bastille Day parade, has said he will make the crossing on Thursday to mark the 110th anniversary of Louis Bl?riot’s first cross-Channel airplane flight.

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36. Tenants will be given access to rogue landlord database16:02[−]

Move follows Guardian/ITV News investigation that found contents were to be kept secret

Campaigners have welcomed government plans to open up its rogue landlord database to prospective tenants, as part of proposals to give greater protection to renters.

A package of reforms published for consultation includes proposals to stop no-fault evictions, which the charity Shelter has described as “far and away the most important thing the government can do” to help renters.

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37. Never be an ego lifter: personal trainers' 12 secrets of succesful exercise16:00[−]

Free advice from fitness professionals? What’s not to like? Here’s how to train harder, smarter and cheaper, whether you’re a beginner or an old hand

Is there any group of people better qualified to comment on fitness habits than personal trainers? From their vantage point on gym floors across the country, they see our grunting, sweating exertion up close: the peacocking bros, the men who don’t wipe down the machines when they are done – and that woman on the treadmill who is never off her phone. But what common mistakes do they witness, day after day? Which fitness myths really wind them up? And can they answer the burning exercise-related question of our times: is Noel Edmonds right to claim that stretching is a con invented by personal trainers?

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38. The press frenzy for Brexit is ushering Boris Johnson into No 10 | Roy Greenslade16:00[−]

The media and public are well aware of his failings, yet this buffoon is set to become prime minister

How do you explain the Boris Johnson phenomenon? Is it the mainstream media’s fault or should we lay the blame on the people? On this, the eve of his anointment as leader of the Conservative party and therefore as British prime minister, it is fitting to ask why the unbelievable has become a reality.

His sins, both political and personal, were recorded in detail in last week’s Guardian. Together they painted a portrait of a man who should never have come close to inhabiting No 10 Downing Street. But the blathering, bumbling bluffer will be there all the same.

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39. Cycle hire firms urged to help clear dumped bikes from canals15:46[−]

Trust says it is recovering 100 bikes a year – docked, dockless, even electric – in London alone

Hundreds of dockless bikes are being dumped in canals and rivers and most operators should do more help clean up the mess, the body responsible for the UK’s waterways has complained.

The Canal & River Trust said it was growing increasingly frustrated by the number of hire bikes abandoned in and beside its 2,000-mile network. It said more than 100 hire bikes a year were being thrown into canals in London alone.

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40. We must talk about Palestine – without being antisemitic | Layla Moran15:42[−]
The scandal in Labour is creating a fear among MPs of speaking out for the Palestinian right to equality, justice and statehood

It’s hard to write or talk about antisemitism and the Labour party’s handling of it without descending into deep despair, and not just at the mirror the sorry tale is holding up to the whole of our society, which seems to be becoming less tolerant, more racist and less safe for minorities. This is having greater consequences than the Labour leadership can imagine. In particular, it is stifling the ability of commentators and decision-makers to talk sensibly about the real issues in Palestine.

Related: Jewish leaders accuse Labour of 'letting off' antisemites

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41. Hamlet/Richard III review – all is angry in the garden15:37[−]

Glasgow Botanic Gardens
A superb Nicole Cooper plays Hamlet as a fiercely wronged daughter, while a stripped-down version of Richard reveals an impulsive gambler on a wild streak

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Nicole Cooper’s Hamlet is putting the first player through his paces. Warming up for the performance that will catch the conscience of the king, the actor gives her an impassioned speech in praise of Hecuba. His pretence at emotion sends her into a reverie. “What’s Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, that he should weep for her?” she asks. “What would he do, had he the motive and the cue for passion that I have?” Her answer, that “he would drown the stage with tears”, is the key to her superb performance.

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42. Ex-Unilever boss seeks 'heroic CEOs' to tackle climate change and inequality15:08[−]

Paul Polman also supports Bank of England-backed group promoting disability rights

The former boss of Unilever is seeking a team of “heroic chief executives” to drive a shift to a low-carbon, more inclusive way of doing business.

Paul Polman, who stepped down from the Anglo-Dutch owner of Marmite and Dove in November last year after a decade at the helm, warns that the rise of populism and Brexit are symptoms of capitalism’s failure to adapt. Bosses, he insists, must commit to fighting inequality and tackling the climate emergency.

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43. The Actor's Nightmare review – it's just a stage they're going through14:31[−]

Park theatre, London
Christopher Durang’s breezy sextet of plays takes the cast from pique to panic as he explores the insecurities of performing life

To complement its main-house production of Whodunnit (Unrehearsed), the Park is presenting six short plays by Christopher Durang about the insecurities of actors and the pitfalls of performance. Even if the pieces are uneven in quality, the sextet makes a coherent package proving that Durang is the most theatre-obsessed dramatist alive.

The climactic title-work, dating from 1981, shows a nervy accountant (Stefan Menaul) thrust unprepared into a play that starts as Private Lives and ends as A Man For All Seasons: it’s a potent piece in that it taps into the universal nightmare that in life we all find ourselves in inexplicable situations where everyone but us knows the lines. Even more chilling is a sketch in which Meaghan Martin plays, with a marvellous mix of ingratiation and panic, a collapsing standup who pleadingly asks: “Do you find me funny or disturbing?” On a lighter note, Martin also appears to great effect as a Hollywood hustler meeting a dithering dramatist (Adrian Richards) to persuade him to write a movie about a rabbi who falls in love with a priest.

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44. Change in No 10 will not alter Brexit reality, warns Irish deputy PM14:25[−]

Simon Coveney says there is no chance of backstop being scrapped under new UK leader

A change in British prime minister will not shift the fundamental realities of Brexit, Ireland’s deputy PM has warned, saying there is no chance of the EU ditching or watering down the Irish backstop.

Wholesale changes to Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement have been suggested by some as a way of avoiding a no-deal Brexit, but Coveney told BBC One’s The Andrew Marr Show on Sunday: “If the approach of the new British prime minister is that they’re going to tear up the withdrawal agreement, I think we’re in trouble. I think we’re all in trouble, quite frankly.

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45. Incoming prime minister poses a Brexit puzzle for Brussels14:07[−]

Officials unsure of next Tory leader’s true views on EU or whether MPs will back them

While Westminster has been gripped by the Conservative leadership race, Brussels has been on a Brexit break.

That respite will soon be over. And despite rumours of Brussels compromises in the works, the EU has no off-the-shelf Brexit plan for the new prime minister, who is expected to be announced on Tuesday.

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46. 'All I want is to go': five young athletes on their dreams of Olympic glory14:00[−]

It’s exactly a year until the torch is lit at the Tokyo Olympics. Here, five hopefuls reveal some of the sacrifices they’ve made in the pursuit of a priceless place in Team GB

Lina, 23, grew up in east London. She recently switched from 400m to hurdles

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47. Environment of greater concern than housing or terrorism – UK poll13:59[−]

Concerns over climate crisis growing among British public, poll findings reveal

Protecting the environment has overtaken affordable housing and the threat of terrorism in the British public’s policy priorities over the last eight months, polling has revealed.

Polling by BritainThinks, commissioned by Engage Britain, found that concern about the climate crisis has risen at roughly the same rate for all age groups, and has emerged as the single most important issue for young people. It comes as the activist group Extinction Rebellion is due to stage another round of protests expected to bring parts of the country to a standstill.

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48. Regional policy requires rethink as myth of London's productivity debunked | Larry Elliott13:13[−]

Does a doctor in England’s capital really work three times harder than one in Merthyr Tydfil?

Britain’s regional divide is well known and well documented. The richer bits of the country tend to be clustered below a line drawn from the Wash to the Severn estuary, while London is so different from everywhere else that it may as well be its own city-state.

There is also another divide: between the big cities and the smaller towns. The north-west may be less prosperous than the south-east but on average people are better off in Manchester than they are in Blackpool.

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49. Why terrarium plants like a nice cup of tea | James Wong13:00[−]

Suspended in their glass bowls, terrariums are a delight but they are susceptible to mould. Here’s how to tackle it

It’s one of the most frequent gardening questions I’m asked: “How do you tackle mould growth in terrariums?” On Instagram I have been asked at least half a dozen times today – and it’s only lunchtime. I guess that’s what happens when you share your tiny flat with 30 or so tanks and terrariums, in all shapes and sizes. So, as you asked, here are my tips for keeping your ecosystem under glass healthy and mould free.

Terrariums are an ingenious piece of technology first invented in the 19th century by amateur naturalist Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward. He discovered that delicate, moisture-loving plants, like ferns and mosses, that were next to impossible to grow in the dry, drafty air of Victorian parlours suddenly thrived when the humidity and warmth were sealed around them in closed glass cases. Unfortunately, the same sky-high humidity levels that keep these plants alive can also be perfect for the growth of mould, which can strike without warning and soon overtake a terrarium. However, there are three simple steps you can take to keep the balance in check.

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50. Exploring the Yorkshire Dales by electric campervan13:00[−]

Kettle on, roof up … The world’s only all-electric vintage VW campervan for hire is perfect for pottering around the Dales

‘It’s a bit like a Super Mario Kart,” the owner Kit had joked. And halfway up a steep hill, I got my chance to prove it. Flicking the thrilling “turbo” switch on the dashboard, I rocketed skyward.

Well, perhaps not quite skyward, but what is claimed to be the world’s only all-electric classic VW campervan for hire made easy work of it. To be honest, that was out of character as it’s a vehicle that actively encourages pottering. Often I had the impression I was careering madly along an open road only to glance at the speedo and find I was not quite doing 30mph. But it was the most not-quite-doing-30 fun I think I’ve ever had.

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51. UK defence minister rebuffs criticism over tanker seized in Gulf12:36[−]

Tobias Ellwood denies Britain took ‘eye off the ball’ and says priority is to reduce tensions

The defence minister, Tobias Ellwood, has rejected the charge that a British-flagged tanker seized by Iran in the Gulf could have been better protected, and said the priority for the UK must be to de-escalate tensions.

Ellwood also called for more spending on the Royal Navy, and said the US’s decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal had played a part in the increasing tensions in the region.

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52. Guinness World Records is on a slippery slope | David Mitchell12:00[−]

A street in Wales has replaced one in New Zealand as being the world’s steepest. How long until another road claims the title?

The world has a new steepest street! But it’s more than 1,000 years old. So, did something happen to the previous steepest street? Is this an off-colour attempt to look on the bright side of a horrendous natural disaster? No, the previous steepest street is still there.

So, has the old one somehow got less steep, perhaps because of a horrendous natural disaster? No, it’s as steep as ever. There is no horrendous natural disaster involved with this story. So what’s happened?

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53. Backlash grows against unstaffed libraries11:30[−]
Use of keycards and self-service scanners cannot replace librarians, say campaigners

Harriet Connides hasn’t been to her local library in north London’s East Finchley for months. She used to go every few days, often with her young daughter, but now it is staffed for only 16 hours a week and Connides, who has severe mobility problems, is uncomfortable being in there alone. “I don’t feel safe here any more. If I fall, I don’t know what would happen,” she says.

The disabled toilets are also closed during unstaffed hours. “It’s another avenue cut off from someone who already has a lot of avenues cut off,” says Connides.

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54. John Cooper Clarke: ‘I didn’t want to quit heroin’11:03[−]
While conceding the drug was ‘fabulous the first time’, the veteran performer has one overwhelming message: don’t do it

John Cooper Clarke, the poet and performer who became famous during the punk rock era of the late 1970s, has said he didn’t want to quit taking heroin and weaned himself off the drug for the sake of society rather than for his own health.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs, Clarke recalled the addiction which dominated much of his life in the 1980s, when he was living in a flat in Brixton, south London, with Nico, the late singer and muse of the Velvet Underground.

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55. Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of ‘climb’11:00[−]

Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘climb’

The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘climb’.

Share your photos of what climb means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

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56. Greta Thunberg: ‘They see us as a threat because we’re having an impact’11:00[−]

The climate activist answers questions from famous supporters and Observer readers, with an introduction by Ali Smith

Greta Thunberg. This time last year she was unimaginable. Then, pretty much from nowhere, there she was: small and slight, a girl just turned 16, the way-too-young odd person out on a panel of adults sitting in front of the world’s economic powers at Davos last January. Unshowy and serious, careful, firm, she said it. Our house is on fire.

The ancient Greeks had a word for this: parrhesiastes. It means a person who speaks truth to power: you should not be behaving in this way. Don’t. More specifically it suggests someone in whom directness of expression and access to truth coincide; and it means someone of very little power who’s risking everything – because they can’t not, there’s no option – to speak ethical truth to powers so entrenched that they’re close to tyrannical, because telling this truth is about moral law. “Some people, some companies, some decision-makers in particular know exactly what priceless values they have been sacrificing to continue to make unimaginable amounts of money, and I think many of you here today,” she said to the World Economic Forum conference, “belong to that group of people.”

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57. Now El Chapo’s back in jail, hunt is on for the Mexican drug baron’s money11:00[−]
$12,666,181,704 … that’s the Sinaloa cartel boss’s sales in the US. Now he’s in jail, prosecutors want to seize his vast riches

It’s a favourite current joke in Mexico: “No m?s t?neles!” – no more tunnels. There’s little chance of drug lord Joaqu?n “El Chapo” Guzm?n Loera repeating his famous escapes from Mexican prisons in the US jail where he was sent after being given a life sentence last week by a court in Brooklyn.

So now that El Chapo is removed from the scene, what next? The pillar of the US “Kingpin” strategy against narco-traffic is that the trade is weakened when its leaders are caught and jailed.

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58. Food banks scramble to stop a million children going hungry over holidays11:00[−]

More families turn to food parcels to make up for loss of free school meals, extra childcare costs and benefit payment delays

Church and community food banks are preparing for their busiest summer yet, providing meals for children during the school holidays as an increasing number of families struggle with delays in benefit payments.

The Trussell Trust, which supports more than 1,200 food banks, many based in churches, said demand over the next few weeks could exceed last year’s record of 87,496 food parcels during the summer holidays. The 2018 figure was a 20% increase on the same period the previous year.

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59. By the Jaffa Gate, final showdown looms in battle over Jerusalem’s historic hotel11:00[−]
Palestinian tenant of New Imperial Hotel makes plea after supreme court backs Jewish settlers’ bid to buy property

Standing on a balcony at the New Imperial Hotel, overlooking Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem’s Old City, 75-year-old Walid Dajani last week declared a one-man war on Jewish settlers.

Officials from Israel’s supreme court had served an eviction notice against Dajani following a ruling last month that the disputed 2005 sale of the historic 40-room hotel to a radical settler group was valid. The Jewish settlers’ organisation Ateret Cohanim immediately branded him “a squatter” and threatened to seize the building. Such a move would establish a strategically valuable settler presence just inside Jaffa Gate, the main entrance to the ancient city’s Christian Quarter.

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60. Buddhist, teacher, predator: dark secrets of the Triratna guru10:59[−]

British-born guru Sangharakshita was mired in allegations of abuse for years. Now it seems the scandal in his wealthy order went far wider than previously acknowledged

Coddington Court, near the Herefordshire market town of Ledbury, is a late-18th-century red brick mansion surrounded by farmland.

These days it goes by the name of Adhisthana, reflecting its reincarnation as the headquarters of one of the most influential Buddhist orders in the world, the Triratna Community, whose founder, Sangharakshita, lived there until his death last year at the age of 93. With its impressive grounds and gardens, it looks like a serene place for someone to spend their final years. But behind the scenes, the picture is a rather more turbulent one.

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61. Former MEP berates 'culture of sexism' in European parliament10:30[−]

Marietje Schaake recalls unwanted advances, inappropriate remarks and being mistaken for an intern

When Marietje Schaake was elected to the European parliament for the Dutch liberal D66 party a decade ago, she knew what she wanted to do – protect people’s rights online and promote transatlantic relations.

Schaake had not bargained for comments on her clothes and weight, or unwanted advances from male colleagues. As she left parliament after 10 years as an MEP this month, she wondered if her younger self would have been “courageous enough” to run for office had she understood “what I was getting myself into”.

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62. Natasha Lyonne: ‘There’s a fighter in me that wants to survive’10:00[−]

Natasha Lyonne used her starring role in Orange is the New Black to shake off her demons and reinvent herself. The actor and director talks about third chances, crosswords and being the class rebel

In a busy Manhattan restaurant, Natasha Lyonne is eating chicken hearts and talking about resurrection. Her own. “And I had to forgive myself for wasting so many years, instead of punishing myself for this… misshapen life.” You don’t so much interview Lyonne, I quickly learn, as herd her conversations like existential sheep. It is a precise chaos – she has a lot to say and is aware of the many limits of time. Her voice crackles across the busy restaurant – she moves like Joe Pesci as a Simpsons character. A waiter interrupts with a second plate of glistening meats: “Madam, more hearts?” “In many ways, I did think I was going to die.” He makes briefly frantic eye contact with me, then disappears. “So now I’ve had to think, what is the most honest way that I can live? That feels the least like a lie? That means I’m less likely to self-destruct all over again?”

Lyonne has been acting since she was six, first in adverts “for dolls that don’t exist any more”, then with directors including Woody Allen, and in hits such as American Pie, before being hospitalised in 2005 with hepatitis C, a heart infection and a collapsed lung, and undergoing methadone treatment under the smirking glare of New York’s paparazzi. And some years later, having slowly worked her way back into the public eye (with the help of her best friend Chlo? Sevigny, who vouched for her sobriety) she rose again.

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63. Millions face hardship as Zimbabwe comes close to ‘meltdown’10:00[−]

Rising inflation has hit those already struggling with food, fuel and medicine shortages

Millions of people in Zimbabwe face hardship, hunger and chaos as the economy comes close to “meltdown” and drought worsens.

More than 18 months after the military coup that removed Robert Mugabe from power, the new government is struggling to overcome the legacy of the dictator’s 30 years of repressive rule and the consequences of its own failure to undertake meaningful political reform.

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64. Emily Thornberry: ‘Being chippy is a good thing’10:00[−]

A traumatic childhood, losing her long-absent father to dementia, public spats with her party… it seems nothing can keep the shadow foreign secretary down

Aged 17, broke and living alone, Emily Thornberry had a number of low-paid jobs. She was a barmaid at the Hammersmith Palais; there was also a stint in a factory stacking boxes and folding cards. Neither of these youthful experiences, however, has proved quite as indelible as the time she spent as a cleaner on the Townsend Thoresen ferry from Dover to Zeebrugge. The crossing was often rocky and as, a result, passengers were frequently sick. On one occasion, she arrived dutifully at the loos, mop and bucket in hand, only to find every last basin and lavatory pebble-dashed with vomit. What did she do? Was she tempted to make a sudden break for the upper deck and fill her lungs with the North Sea breeze? No, not a bit of it. “I quietly locked the door behind me and I just got on with it,” she says, wrinkling her nose.

It’s hard to resist making a metaphor out of this anecdote, given that many people are wondering for how much longer the vast majority of Labour MPs intend to put up with the stench that currently rises from their party. Our meeting takes place in Thornberry’s constituency office in Islington a week after the screening of the Panorama programme in which former Labour staffers alleged that key Labour figures had interfered with investigations into complaints of anti semitism in the party: a period of days during which, to put it mildly, quite a lot has happened. A group of MPs, among them Yvette Cooper and Stephen Kinnock, has urged the party’s national executive committee to set up an independent investigation into the allegations. Some 200 former and current Labour party staff have challenged Corbyn to resign if he cannot renew trust in its dealings with its employees (the whistleblowers had to break nondisclosure agreements in order to speak out). Sixty Labour peers – a full third of the party’s members in the Lords – have taken out an advert accusing Corbyn of having “failed the test of leadership”. The atmosphere grows more febrile by the minute.

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65. Mark Kermode chooses 25 of the best films for children10:00[−]

From early animation to foreign-language gems via all-time classics, a range of movies to whet budding cinematic appetites

What is a children’s film? Is it a film aimed specifically at younger viewers, tailor-made to cater to their growing needs? Maybe it’s a film about childhood, a coming-of-age story that resonates with a wide range of viewers, young and old alike. Or perhaps it’s simply any film that a child could watch, anything that isn’t restricted by its nature to adult-only audiences.

When I was a kid in the late 60s and early 70s, there were two movie classifications that excluded younger viewers: the AA category, introduced in 1970, for which you had to be at least 14 years old; and X-certificate movies, which were restricted to over-16s or (after 1970) over-18s. Films that fell under these prohibitive categories included everything from the David Essex/Ringo Starr Brit-pop romp That’ll Be the Day to the violent Sam Peckinpah shocker Straw Dogs via such innocuous fare as Blazing Saddles, American Graffiti and Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. All of these were out of bounds in my preteen years. Yet there were plenty more strange and wonderful films that fell into the U or A certificate categories, making them available to anyone (or at least anyone over the age of five), sometimes under adult supervision, more often not…

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66. Bolsonaro pick for Funai agency horrifies indigenous leaders10:00[−]
  • Marcelo Xavier da Silva is police officer linked to agribusiness
  • Former agency employee: ‘I am scared of him’

Indigenous leaders and specialists working with Brazil’s nearly one million tribal people have been stunned and disconcerted by the appointment of a federal police officer with strong connections to agribusiness as the new head of the country’s indigenous agency.

Related: Bolsonaro declares 'the Amazon is ours' and calls deforestation data 'lies'

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67. Market Harborough reveals the key to being ‘liveable’: homes we can afford10:00[−]

East Midlands town is unexpected winner in a search for the best places for affordability and quality of life. Its proud residents explain why they like it

“We’ve still got a fishmonger. How many places still have that?” asked Kate Gander, listing the merits of her home, Market Harborough. In fact, she struggled to find anything negative at all to say about the Leicestershire town. “It’s got fantastic railway connections and it’s not too overrun by big businesses,” she said.

Market Harborough today comes top in a league table of the most – and least – liveable places in England. Balancing the affordability of homes with factors that make a place desirable to live in, such as employment opportunities and the performance of local schools, Harborough, Hart in Hampshire, the Isles of Scilly and Chorley in Lancashire are at the top of the table. Hackney, in east London, Middlesbrough and Manchester languish at the bottom.

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68. The big picture: capturing the essence of India’s endangered Khasi people09:00[−]

Aishwarya Arumbakkam’s Ka Dingiei series is inspired by the beliefs of an ancient Indian community

In the Indian state of Meghalaya – meaning “abode of the clouds” in Sanskrit – a small village sits near the border with Bangladesh. Lama Punji is home to 40 families from the Khasi indigenous ethnic group, whose use of the land and its resources is based on a traditional system of unwritten laws. But since 1998, the north-eastern region’s protected forests have been subject to large-scale destruction because of stone and sand mining. Unfavourable government policies, corporate might and legal loopholes have left the Khasi families powerless to resist the quarrying.

Photographer and film-maker Aishwarya Arumbakkam first visited Lama Punji in 2015 and has since been documenting the effect of mining on the village and its people in her ongoing series Ka Dingiei. Rather than taking a documentary approach, Arumbakkam’s lyrical and allegorical style is inspired by an ancient Khasi belief that nature is intrinsically linked to the divine, and destroying it could sever these ties.

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69. The 10 ages of Boris Johnson: a guide to his road to power09:00[−]

From bullied schoolboy to betrayer of women and voters, his career trajectory has been a controversial one

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson was born on 19 June 1964 in New York and is still known by his family as Al. Over the next 14 years he moved house 32 times across two continents as his father Stanley pursued a wide-ranging career. Only 22 when she had him, his mother Charlotte had given up her English degree at Oxford to accompany her husband to the US. Until the age of eight Boris was severely deaf with glue ear and was a subdued child. His mother encouraged him to be arty but Stanley inculcated an uber-competitive streak in his family.

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70. Weeding, writing and arithmetic… why green fingers are good for our children09:00[−]
Schools should teach pupils gardening skills to instil a passion for the environment in future generations, says horticultural chief

From the water vole to the Scottish wildcat, the dwindling numbers of Britain’s most at-risk animals are well documented. But now the alarm bell is sounding over a rather more overlooked endangered species: green-fingered children.

Young people are so rarely spotted in gardens across Britain nowadays that the Royal Horticultural Society is warning that the country is facing a green skills crisis unless more learn to garden.

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71. Martha’s, London: ‘Nearly very special’ – restaurant review08:00[−]

Like a much-loved friend, Martha’s in Soho is a bit hit and miss – but its heart is in the right place

Martha’s, 56 Wardour Street, London W1D 4JG (020 3982 8377). Starters ?7.50-?12; main courses ?10-?28; wines from ?26

If Martha was a friend of mine, I’d be begging her to get her shit together. I’d be telling her she has buckets of potential, but that it won’t come to anything if she carries on like this. Get some sleep. Stop winging it. As it happens, Martha’s is a restaurant in London’s Soho, and this is still the speech it needs to hear. Because hiding beneath the posturing and the chaos and the unflamed dessert – we’ll get there – are the beginnings of a terrific night out.

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72. My parents’ endless rows have left me angry and depressed | Mariella Frostrup08:00[−]

You are still carrying the scars from your upbringing, says Mariella Frostrup. Now your focus should be on yourself and how not to repeat the behaviours of your parents

The dilemma I’m 22 years old and for as long as I can remember my parents have constantly had arguments in which they would be abusive to one another – mostly verbally, occasionally physically. As a teenager I struggled with my sexuality and coming out, and I had depression until I got treatment at university. Home didn’t provide respite and the constant rows made it worse. I’d often get involved to try and make them stop, whereas my brother would retreat into his room to escape. In general, I’m happy, however I feel my ability to deal with conflict is damaged. I’m very passive and feel the need to please people. I worry about repeating these patterns when I have my own relationship. My brother also has mental health issues. Whenever I come home, they still argue and it never seems to improve. I feel angry at how selfish they were bringing up children through that, and I used to wish they’d get divorced, for all of our happiness. If I can’t change this, then what else can I do?

Mariella replies First, pity them. That’s three whole decades of dysfunctional partnership they’ve battled though. I appreciate that the reason you’ve written is to seek advice on how to escape the burden you continue to bear. It may sound over-optimistic, but shrugging off personal responsibility and learning from your parents’ mistakes rather than inheriting their predilection for pain are both entirely achievable goals.

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73. 'It's a political civil war': Trump's racist tirades set tone for 202008:00[−]

After Trump again embraced white identity politics, Charlottesville – the scene of a far-right murder two years ago – fears racial tensions could explode again

If Donald Trump’s racist diatribe against four congresswomen of colour was intended to animate his most loyal supporters, it seemed to have worked with Clark Smith.

Related: The moderate squad: swing-state Democrats wary of leftward path

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74. Panama deregisters oil tanker that strayed into Iranian waters07:16[−]

Country says MT Riah, which stopped transmitting location on 14 July, ‘deliberately violated international regulations’

Panama’s maritime authority has begun the process of withdrawing the registration of the oil tanker MT Riah, which ended up in Iranian waters after it disappeared from ship tracking maps in the strait of Hormuz on 14 July.

Panama began the flag-withdrawal process on Friday after an investigation determined the tanker had “deliberately violated international regulations” by not reporting any unusual situation, the authority said in a statement.

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75. Messing about on the Seine – in picturesСб., 20 июля[−]

An accidental photograph taken on a bridge began Adrian Skenderovic’s fascination with the boats on the Seine. Over four years, the Paris-based photographer has returned to the same spot more than 50 times to capture scenes on passing boats for his series Down the River. “Seeing human life from on top is like observing ants,” he says. “The bird’s-eye view gave me a distant perspective on human behaviour.” Skenderovic loves that there’s something for everyone on the Seine. “The bigger boats pack in the tourists, medium ones also host parties and weddings, then every now and again a yacht with Jacuzzi and champagne makes an appearance.”

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76. Algeria fans light up London after Afcon triumph – in picturesСб., 20 июля[−]

Finsbury Park and Trafalgar Square were deluged with more than 1,000 Algeria supporters after their national football team won the Africa Cup of Nations on Friday night

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77. The 20 photographs of the weekСб., 20 июля[−]

Black Lives Matter protests, Tropical Storm Barry, demonstrations in Puerto Rico and the Tour de France – the last seven days, as captured by the world’s best photojournalists.

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78. Tell us about your favourite canal boat shopСб., 20 июля[−]

There are more licensed boats using Britain’s canals than at the height of the industrial revolution – and barge-based businesses are booming too. Tell us which canal shops float your boat

As city centres are emptying waterways are becoming not just an alternative place to live but an attractive business space too.

Are waterways becoming a new high street? Floating traders now run all manner of businesses from their boats – from grocery shops to record stores and restaurants to antiques emporiums. Narrowboats are being turned into hair salons, cafes, bookshops and bars.

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79. Share - An instagram star at a crossroads - videoПт., 19 июля[−]

Tim is an 18-year-old Asian-American with more than 4m followers on Instagram. He lives online, grabbing his phone first thing in the morning and even taking baths with it sometimes. Although Tim usually shares funny memes, he occasionally posts about mental health. In exploring his reasons for these posts, we discover he has created a different persona online than in real life. Will he be able to reconcile the two? Tackling issues of identity, family and communication, the film is a heartbreaking yet ultimately uplifting story about a Generation Z teenager at an important crossroads in his life

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80. Tell us: how has social media changed your neighbourhood?Пт., 19 июля[−]

From local WhatsApp and Facebook groups to other virtual communities, how do you connect with neighbours online?

People don’t just hide people behind their screens. Whether it’s a WhatsApp group for park parties, or a Facebook page for your entire street, the internet also connects neighbours who might once have passed each other by. Has the internet made you more neighbourly?

Related: WhatsApp: inside the secret world of group chat

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81. Moonfire: the Epic Journey of Apollo 11 – in picturesПт., 19 июля[−]

Images from the 50th-anniversary edition of Norman Mailer’s account of the Nasa mission published by Taschen

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82. 'A thrill ran through me': your memories of the Apollo 11 moon landingПт., 19 июля[−]

Readers share their memories of a life changing shared experience, including relics and photographs from 1969

I was 16 years old, sitting in our huge downstairs recreation room with my parents, my brothers and sister, and many of our closest friends. We were one of the few families with a large colour television in our circle of friends, so we invited many of them to join us to watch Apollo 11 land. As I recall now, there were almost 30 of us sitting and standing, hardly daring to even talk as we watched.

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83. The Jeffrey Epstein scandal - podcastПт., 19 июля[−]

The financier Jeffrey Epstein is back in court on charges of the sex trafficking of minors. Vicky Ward and Ed Pilkington discuss his case. Plus: Aditya Chakrabortty wonders why the French super-rich who promised to donate to Notre Dame haven’t paid up yet

Jeffrey Epstein is a wealthy financier and one-time friend to the rich and famous, counting Donald Trump, Prince Andrew and Bill Clinton as acquaintances. In 2005 a 14-year-old girl reported that Epstein had molested her in Palm Beach. Others came forward, some of them also minors. But after plea negotiations between Epstein’s legal team and the then US attorney in Miami, Alexander Acosta, Epstein served just 13 months in prison.

This month he was arrested on sex trafficking charges and last week federal prosecutors claimed that lewd photographs of girls as young as 14 had been discovered in a safe in his Manhattan mansion. Epstein, 66, has pleaded not guilty. Journalist Vicky Ward tells Anushka Asthana about meeting Epstein in 2002 when she was profiling him for Vanity Fair magazine, while the Guardian’s Ed Pilkington discusses the current case.

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84. After the hunger strike: Richard Ratcliffe on the fight to free Nazanin - videoЧт., 18 июля[−]

In 2016 Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was arrested in Iran and charged with espionage. Her young daughter, Gabriella, was with her at the time and the family have been separated ever since. We join her husband, Richard Ratcliffe, in London following a 15-day hunger strike as he campaigns to get his wife released. He shares his experience in detail and explains how Boris Johnson could have hindered her chances of coming home

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85. Has Brexit saved the Lib Dems?Чт., 18 июля[−]

The Lib Dems have made an extraordinary comeback in 2019 because of their anti-Brexit stance. The Observer political editor, Toby Helm, discusses whether the party is here to stay. And: Oliver Wainwright on the inclusion of social housing in this year’s Stirling architecture prize

The Liberal Democrats have spent most of this decade paying the electoral price for the coalition of 2010-15. The party plummeted from 57 MPs to a mere eight. Under Tim Farron and Vince Cable, the party was no longer preparing for government, but for possible extinction. Yet Brexit, along with Tory and Labour divisions on the issue, has driven a Lib Dem revival.

Toby Helm, the Observer political editor, discusses with Anushka Asthana the rise and fall and rise again of the Liberal Democrat party. Next week, the Lib Dems will also choose a new leader. Toby and Anushka discuss the candidate options of Jo Swinson and Ed Davey and how they can capitalise on this wave of remainer support.

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86. Why do so many people still believe the moon landings were a hoax? – podcastСр., 17 июля[−]

On the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission that first put humans on the moon, Richard Godwin explores why conspiracy theories about the landings still endure. Plus Geoff Andrews on his part in the Guardian’s lunar front page from 1969 – and how he missed the famous quote

It took 400,000 Nasa employees and contractors to put Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon in 1969 – but only one man to spread the idea that it was all a hoax. His name was Bill Kaysing.

It began as “a hunch, an intuition”, before turning into “a true conviction” – that the US lacked the technical prowess to make it to the moon (or, at least, to the moon and back). Richard Godwin tells Anushka Asthana how Kaysing’s self-published 1976 pamphlet We Never Went to the Moon: America’s Thirty Billion Dollar Swindle sought to provide evidence for his conviction by means of grainy photocopies and ludicrous theories. Yet somehow he established a few perennials that are kept alive to this day in Hollywood movies and Fox News documentaries, Reddit forums and YouTube channels.

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87. Boris Johnson's failed vanity projects as London mayor – videoВт., 16 июля[−]

From sweatbox buses to a novelty 'dangleway' and fantasy bridges that never saw a brick laid. Boris Johnson’s design legacy in London left the taxpayer with a bill of more than ?940m after his eight years as mayor. The Guardian's design and architecture critic, Oliver Wainwright, takes a tour of the worst monuments to Johnson's ego etched across the capital. He finds out what they really cost us then and how much we are still paying for them now

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88. It's time we stopped treating soil like dirt – videoЧт., 11 июля[−]

Soil is pretty remarkable stuff. It provides 95% of our food, helps regulate the Earth’s atmosphere and is a bigger carbon sink than all the world's forests combined. In fact, it basically enables all life on this planet to exist. So why do we treat it like dirt? The Guardian journalist Josh Toussaint-Strauss finds out how we are destroying it, but also discovers some of the progress made in the race to protect the Earth’s soils


Soil organisations

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89. The history of Secret Cinema: ‘The idea came from a mash-up of music, festivals and going clubbing’Пт., 05 июля[−]

It’s the phenomenon that raised the bar for film screenings. Secret Cinema founder Fabien Riggall tells how he created a new genre of mass entertainment

“I think the future of cinema is Secret Cinema,” says Fabien Riggall.

Riggall just happens to be the founder of Secret Cinema, which might make you think it’s a piece of sales bluster, but from Riggall it sounds like a statement of faith.

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90. Get into character, forget your phone: the dos and don’ts of Secret CinemaПт., 05 июля[−]

Whether you’re embracing the 1980s for Stranger Things or getting into spy mode for Casino Royale, here’s an inside guide to making the most of the immersive night out

It’s hard to think of an experience that’s quite like film’s most exciting night out. Secret Cinema’s concept of screening a film while immersing the audience in a theatrical recreation of the world on the screen in front of them is nothing if not a unique way of doing things.

If you want to get the most out of it, it’s best to make sure you know how it’s done. And, given that its latest incarnation – Secret Cinema presents Stranger Things – is set to be a new direction for the event, there’s something to be learned even by those who’ve been before. Here’s a list to help you wring every last drop of joy out of the latest Secret Cinema experience:

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91. Stranger Things: everything you need to know before hitting Secret CinemaПт., 05 июля[−]

Need the lowdown on the Upside Down? Why, here you go, mouthbreathers …

So Secret Cinema is showing Stranger Things?
Yes! After years of screening movies, this is their first foray into TV. Right now, the team are turning a super-secret (obvs) London location into Hawkins, Indiana – the scariest town in America – so fans get the chance to experience it first hand. Expect: adventure, epic music, scary monsters and more 1980s nostalgia than you can shake a Rubik’s Cube at.

Sounds like I might need to brush up on my Stranger Things knowledge. First up: who’s who again?
Mike is the leader of the gang. He set out to track down missing best friend Will, remember? Mike likes three things: Dungeons & Dragons, Ghostbusters and falling for mysterious shaven-headed girls who’ve recently escaped government testing facilities.

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92. Going to Secret Cinema? Here’s the ultimate Stranger Things playlistПт., 05 июля[−]

Get yourself in the mood for a night at Secret Cinema’s Stranger Things event with these songs

Does any show have music so gleamingly, eerily evocative as Stranger Things? A third season of the Netflix series arrives in July, and its soundtrack composers, Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein, play their limb-shaking synthesiser themes at Nile Rodgers’ Meltdown festival in August. A Secret Cinema Stranger Things night in November will also give fans the chance to explore the cast’s hometown of Hawkins, Indiana – recreated in a London location – and bathe in the rush of period pop from the show. Just don’t get caught in the Upside Down while dancing to The Cure, if you can help it.

The emotional charge of music is essential to Stranger Things. Even before its directors, the Duffer brothers, approached them to soundtrack the show, Dixon and Stein of Texan electronic band Survive collected old synthesisers and loved unusual films. They already made their music on machines whose very mention prompts blood pressure spikes in geeks of a certain age (the Roland TR-606 and the Prophet-6 are among their favourites), and they also gobbled up Italian horror and alternative sci-fi.

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93. Lord of the Rain: one man's fight against climate catastrophe – videoЧт., 04 июля[−]

Doyte lives in South Omo, Ethiopia, one of the most remote areas in the world and hard hit by the climate crisis. As Lord of the Rain, it’s Doyte’s job to summon the rains, but for five years they haven’t come. Ethiopia’s economy is booming, fuelled by green power and climate-resilient policies. But neither the government, nor Doyte, can reverse the catastrophic change that’s devastating their environment


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94. Will this young Muslim be Boris Johnson's ultimate downfall? – videoЧт., 27 июня[−]

Boris Johnson may have his eyes on being prime minister but, if successful, he will walk into No 10 with one of the smallest majorities in history. The candidate trying to oust him from the seat of Uxbridge and South Ruislip is Ali Milani, a 24-year-old Muslim immigrant, who describes himself as the 'antithesis' of Johnson

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95. Creature comforts: has the US's emotional support animal epidemic gone too far? – videoСр., 26 июня[−]

Emotional support animals, or ESAs, have exploded across the US in recent years, with rising numbers of pet owners getting their animals certified online. Unlike in the UK, ESAs have legal status in the US on a tier below traditional service animals, but the backlash has begun – with critics complaining the system is being abused by regular pet owners who want to take their animals into unsuitable public spaces. The Guardian's Richard Sprenger – animal lover but pet sceptic – meets ESA owners and their animals across North America.

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96. How your period is making other people rich – videoЧт., 20 июня[−]

Menstrual cycles have historically been a personal topic. But with the rise of period-tracking apps, intimate knowledge of women's bodies has become big business, with marketers using the data women and girls put into their phones to exploit their hormones in an attempt to sell them things they did not realise they wanted

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97. London's toxic school runs: how polluted is the air children breathe? - videoСр., 19 июня[−]

Most UK cities have had illegally polluted air for nearly a decade, and the effect of air pollution is particularly bad on children. Ahead of Clean Air Day, we conducted an experiment to assess the air quality on a school run in central London, using new state-of-the art monitors that can measure air pollution in real time

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98. Brexit breakdown: 14 days that shook politics | Anywhere but Westminster - videoСр., 05 июня[−]

Starting with the unexpected scramble for the European parliament and ending with the byelection buildup in Peterborough, John Harris and John Domokos go on a mammoth road trip into the new reality: politics changed forever by the internet, and voters who want direct control

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99. The highs and lows of impersonating Boris Johnson – videoПн., 15 апр.[−]

Drew Galdron has been impersonating the Conservative politician for 11 years. His recent focus has been on campaigning against Brexit, but with Johnson tipped as a Tory leadership contender, is his life about to get even busier?


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100. Funeral poverty: one woman's battle to pay for her son's burial – videoСр., 10 апр.[−]

One suddenly bereaved mother, already in debt, has to find thousands of pounds to pay for her son's funeral. The funeral business is an unregulated industry, with providers criticised for taking advantage of vulnerable, grieving families, who can then feel obliged to pay large sums of money for an appropriate goodbye. Across the UK the average funeral cost stands at ?4,271, having risen 122% since 2004. The Guardian’s Richard Sprenger reports


With thanks to Down to Earth, Quaker Social Action

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101. A day of Brexit chaos – podcastПт., 16 нояб. 2018[−]

Anushka Asthana joins her colleagues in Westminster on a chaotic and extraordinary day in British politics as Theresa May attempted to build support for her Brexit deal while members of her cabinet resigned in protest. Plus: in an exclusive extract from her autobiography, Michelle Obama reveals how she met her husband, Barack

Theresa May lost two of her Brexiter cabinet ministers in a frenzied morning at Westminster. Dominic Raab, the Brexit secretary, and Esther McVey, the work and pensions secretary, resigned in protest at the prime minister’s Brexit deal.

Anushka Asthana headed straight to Westminster for one of the most chaotic days in British politics in years. The Guardian’s Dan Sabbagh explains how the hard Brexiters are gathering letters of no confidence in a bid to remove May, while the Labour party stands ready to take power if the government collapses and a general election is required.

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