Economy | The Guardian17:49 Текст источника в новой вкладке
Latest financial, market & economic news and analysis from The Guardian
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2018

 
 
1. Petrol price war looms after 3p per litre drop in wholesale costs14:02[−]

Correction in pump prices, currently at four-year high, could be imminent

Fuel retailers may be about to engage in a price war, the AA has said.

A 3p per litre slump in wholesale costs this month suggests pump prices could be about to drop, according to the AA. This would be welcome relief for motorists who are being hit by prices at a four-year high after 11 consecutive weekly increases.

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2. 'Our house fell apart – but our insurer won't pay the full amount'11:00[−]

A Sussex family has had an eight-year battle to get a full payout over subsidence in their home

A Sussex family has accused Direct Line of “shocking and appalling” treatment following an eight-year battle over a subsidence claim during which time, they say, the property has worsened each year to the point of becoming dangerous.

Robert Sherburn first reported cracks in the walls back in 2010, when he and his wife Anna’s first son, Hector was still in nappies. Eight years on, they say their three children have had to live in a home that is falling apart, and the subsidence is so bad they can put a hand through some of the holes in the walls. Rain was leaking into the kids’ bedrooms.

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3. When is the best time to book a hotel room for a good deal?09:00[−]

I made a reservation two months in advance – but now the same rooms are 25% cheaper

Every week a Guardian Money reader submits a question, and it’s up to you to help him or her out – a selection of the best answers will appear in next Saturday’s paper.

When is the best time to book a hotel room? I am going to Germany in October and decided to book in August as I thought it would be cheaper. It was quoted at €80 at an apparent 15% discount. The same hotel is now selling rooms at €60 for the same dates. It is quite annoying. What should I do next time?

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4. Voice recognition: is it really as secure as it sounds?09:00[−]

Banks and tax offices are using the technology – but some experts claim it can be duped

With millions of us accustomed to barking orders at Alexa and Siri, it’s probably not surprising that voice recognition services offered by banks and other organisations are taking off in a big way.

It emerged this week that HM Revenue & Customs has so far signed up about 6.7 million people to its voice identification (or “voice ID”) service, while HSBC says it has more than 10,000 people registering each week.

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5. 'I had cancer – but my insurer tried to wriggle out of paying'09:00[−]

Sheila Hastings took out critical illness cover, but faced a fight over her ?280,000 claim

When Sheila Hastings* heard just days after her daughter’s wedding that she had an “aggressive” form of kidney cancer and major surgery was inevitable, she was comforted that at least she had a “critical illness” insurance policy taken out with Zurich eight years earlier.

These policies are supposed to pay out a lump sum if you are diagnosed with a life-threatening illness such as cancer or heart disease. Typically, they cost about ?100 a month for each ?100,000 of cover if taken out by someone in their late 40s or early 50s. In Sheila Hastings’ case, her policy would pay out ?279,224 on diagnosis.

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6. I’ll get my pension soon, but I’ll have to keep working to pay off my mortgage'09:00[−]

Richard Bannan, 64, on why his ‘frugal’ lifestyle wouldn’t change even if he won the lottery

I earn ?33,000 a year but I still have ?55,000 on my mortgage with repayments of ?675 a month. I’m about one month off from collecting my pension under the old system, but I’m going to have to work past the retirement age to pay off my mortgage.

I bought my council house in south-east London for ?26,000 19 years ago and five years later I only had ?19,000 left to pay, but then I had to remortgage for ?80,000 due to credit card debts. I also had to pay for an undergraduate course, MA and law practice, so from nearly mortgage free I ended up with a large amount to repay. I don’t regret it, as I went on to earn a good salary.

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7. Ministers urged to get tough on minimum wage offenders02:01[−]

Companies were fined only ?14m in year when staff were underpaid by ?15.6m

Ministers have been urged to impose tougher penalties on companies that pay their staff below the minimum wage after it emerged that the government fined companies only ?14m in a year when rogue employers underpaid their staff by ?15.6m.

It is a criminal offence not to pay the minimum wage, and the maximum fine is 200% of every penny underpaid. Firms found in breach must also repay staff all the money they are owed.

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8. Is money-laundering scandal at Danske Bank the largest in history?Пт., 21 сент.[−]

Scale of fiasco highlights need for stricter regulation and cross-border force in Europe

The Russian-speaking caller refused to give a name but the threat was explicit: “Do you really feel you can walk home safely at night?”

It was 2013 and officers at the Estonian branch of Danske Bank were beginning to realise they had taken on some very unpleasant customers. After a tipoff, a member of staff had travelled to Moscow and started asking questions. The team was trying to trace the identity of people hiding behind anonymous corporate vehicles, which had opened accounts and were now using them to transfer huge sums of money. That was when its staff began to receive anonymous threats. “This bank will sink,” one caller warned.

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9. Uber bid to buy Deliveroo could give founder ?150m payoutПт., 21 сент.[−]

Reports say Uber Eats is in talks to gobble up London-based rival food app for ?1.5bn

The Deliveroo founder Will Shu could be set for a payout of nearly ?150m ($200m), with reports that Uber has been in talks to buy the London-based food delivery service for at least ?1.5bn.

Uber has said it wants to build scale in the takeaway delivery market as its Uber Eats service battles heavy competition in the US from Grubhub.

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10. RBS and Barclays asked to explain 'addition to litany of IT failures'Пт., 21 сент.[−]

Treasury committee head calls for compensation for customers after latest glitches

The head of the powerful Treasury Committee, Nicky Morgan MP, is demanding answers from RBS and Barclays – and compensation for customers – after technical failures left millions of users locked out of their accounts.

Royal Bank of Scotland, NatWest and Ulster Bank customers were unable to access online and mobile accounts between 5am and 10.30am on Friday morning, in the latest blow for confidence in Britain’s online banking infrastructure.

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11. Let’s move to Leytonstone: the Olympics still niggles, but it’s on good formПт., 21 сент.[−]

It’s quite humdrum, but mostly in a nice way

What’s going for it? The new Walthamstow. Or that might be Leyton, I forget. Or Maryland. Or Forest Gate. There are so many contenders for Outer East End Hotspot these days I can’t keep up. Blame 2012. The Olympics splattered money round these parts, in the form of newly minted bollards and cheery paint schemes. It also divided opinion. Strike up a conversation about “it” in the queue at Percy Ingle on the High Road and six years later you’re still likely to leave with a flea in your ear as well as a sliced bloomer. Still, Leytonstone appears on good form. The tootsie toes of Epping Forest dip into the streets to the north, its Hollow Ponds green space fringed by office workers on their lunch break, dreaming of escape over BLTs. A few blocks south, conversely, escapees from the rest of the planet have come to rest on the High Road, from Romanian delis to Turkish grills to Madame Chic’s “frizerie”. There are even signs of those most benighted of immigrants: artists. They’ve lived round here since the 1980s (the 1890s if you include native ’Stoner Alfred Hitchcock), famously adding chutzpah to the M11 Link Road protests a decade later. These days the art’s less bolshie (though July’s Arts Trail is a blast) and more conceptual macram?, but at least the gentrifiers haven’t invaded in full force yet.

The case against… Sliced by that M11 Link Road, belching pollution. Quite humdrum (but mostly in a nice way). Still a long way from the kool kats in Hackney and the Stow, if that’s your ambition.

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12. Northern is a disaster. Why have commuters been left to face it alone? | Kate AnsteeПт., 21 сент.[−]

I founded Northern Resist to protest a rail service that is ruining passengers’ lives. When will the government step in?

The service provided by Northern (rail) has fallen well below a decent standard for many years now, but has significantly worsened since Arriva took over the franchise in 2016. I founded the Northern Resist group to protest about how difficult people’s lives were becoming to manage as a result of a train service that is so integral to the country’s functioning – and that is failing them every single day.

While the delays, cancellations and overcrowding were my biggest gripes, other issues such as communication, my treatment on social media and general lack of empathy towards my situation exacerbated my angst with Northern. Following the timetable change in May 2018 the situation became a whole lot worse. The chaos that ensued on Northern and other parts of the UK rail network was laid bare by the rail regulator’s report on Thursday – “nobody took charge”, it concluded.

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13. Idris Elba's Parrot bar adds shot of celebrity to London’s cocktail mixПт., 21 сент.[−]

Actor’s Aldwych venture has ‘A-list surprises’, chauffeur-driven Aston Martins and DJ Driis on the decks

Idris Elba is the latest celebrity planning to open a luxury bar for his actor pals to hang out in alongside wealthy drinkers.

When Elba’s bar, the Parrot, opens at the Waldorf Hilton hotel on Aldwych next month it will be the first London bar to offer its clientele a ride to and from the venue in a chauffeur-driven Aston Martin. It is also promising “a whole host of A-list surprises” alongside the martinis and mojitos.

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14. Ex-BHS owner Dominic Chappell loses appeal against convictionПт., 21 сент.[−]

Judge says evidence submitted by Chappell was ‘untrue’ and without credibility

A judge has branded the former BHS owner Dominic Chappell “evasive” and “entirely unbelievable” as his appeal against his failure to hand over vital documents to the pensions watchdog was rejected on Friday.

Chappell, 51, showed no emotion as a judge dismissed his claims that he had “done everything in his powers” to help provide the information.

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15. Lidl to stop using black plastic fruit and vegetable packagingПт., 21 сент.[−]

Black plastic, which cannot be recycled, to be phased out by end of month

Lidl UK says it will remove black plastic from its entire fruit and vegetable range by the end of the month.

Black plastic packaging is not recyclable in the UK, as it cannot be detected by the sorting systems used for plastic recycling, and the supermarket chain says its move will save an estimated 50 tonnes of black plastic waste a year.

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16. Money for nothing? Dire Straits back-catalogue investment venture launchedПт., 21 сент.[−]

Firm has scheme that allows individuals, hedge funds and others to buy share of royalties

First it was David Bowie selling his own “Bowie bonds”, and now fans of Dire Straits are being given the chance to invest in the band’s multimillion-selling back catalogue.

A new investment scheme has been launched that allows individuals, hedge funds and others to buy a share of the royalties that are paid out every time one of the British rock band’s songs or albums is bought, downloaded, streamed or played on the radio.

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17. Why can’t I get a no-claims bonus on my second car?Пт., 21 сент.[−]
I’ve built up 10 years’ discount on one car but can’t use it for a second vehicle

I bought a second car and found an insurance quote. I sent a copy of the insurance certificate for my other car showing 10 years’ no-claims discount (NCD) but was told I would have to pay almost ?90 more because I needed to build up an NCD on my new car. How can I have 10 years driving one vehicle and none driving another?

VW, Leicestershire

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18. Church of England pulls out of Wonga rescue effortПт., 21 сент.[−]

Justin Welby says church has decided not to participate in buyout of payday lender

The Church of England has pulled out of an attempt to buy the loan book of the collapsed payday lender Wonga following a week of talks led by the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, aimed at protecting the interests of vulnerable borrowers.

The move creates fresh uncertainty for around 200,000 borrowers who could now be forced to pay back their debts at high rates by a commercial lending firm.

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19. UK government deficit widens unexpectedly in AugustПт., 21 сент.[−]

Results likely to frustrate chancellor as he prepares to fund pledge for ?20bn annual rise in NHS funding

The UK government deficit widened unexpectedly in August, handing Philip Hammond disappointing news ahead of the autumn budget.

Public sector net borrowing last month, excluding the nationalised banks, grew by ?2.4bn to ?6.8bn compared with August a year ago, according to the Office for National Statistics.

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20. Donald Trump’s currency confusion continues | Jeffrey FrankelПт., 21 сент.[−]

The US president blames China but even a basic understanding of economics shows it’s his own policies that bloat the dollar

Next month, the US Department of the Treasury is due to submit to Congress its biannual report detailing which countries, if any, are manipulating their currencies to gain an unfair trade advantage. For his part, President Donald Trump is already accusing China of doing so, as he did throughout the 2016 election campaign. And he is reportedly trying to influence the Treasury Department’s deliberations.

What has changed since the last report in April? That document, like similar reports written during the previous two administrations, did not find China guilty of manipulation. In fact, the last time the Treasury Department declared China (or anyone else) a manipulator was in 1994.

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21. Don’t buy the Brexit hype: it’s a border in the Irish Sea or the customs union | Jonathan LisПт., 21 сент.[−]

The rejection of the Chequers plan at Salzburg was no surprise – the EU will never accept a fudge on the Irish border

Donald Tusk’s clear rejection of Theresa May’s Chequers plan at the Salzburg summit yesterday should not come as a surprise. The most important lesson of the Brexit negotiation is that it is not a negotiation, and never has been. Blessed with superior size, wealth and power, the EU has been able to dictate the framework and substance of the talks, and has refused any deviation from its red lines.

The second most important lesson of the Brexit negotiation is that the EU will prioritise its economic and political cohesion above all else. That cohesion rests on two key outcomes: an undivided single market and an open border on the island of Ireland.

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22. Fragmented railways will never work, public or private | Simon JenkinsПт., 21 сент.[−]
As long as Britain’s trains and infrastructure are run as separate entities, the chaos will continue

Imagine going into a restaurant, sitting down and giving your order to the waiter. The order is then passed into a back kitchen, where someone employed by a different owner is contracted to cook it, arguing all the time with his lawyers and accountants over the recipe and the price. That is Britain’s rail system, born of idiocy and ideology in Whitehall 25 years ago. It is demoralised and it is broken.

This week’s report by the rail regulator, the Office of Road and Rail, on this year’s timetabling chaos could hardly be clearer. “Nobody took charge.” In a time-sensitive service industry, chopping up the supply chain is fatal. Restaurants must run their kitchens. Train companies must run their tracks and stations. As the crisis mounted everyone thought someone else could take the blame.

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23. Inside the News Corp tribe: how powerful editors shape the newsЧт., 20 сент.[−]

In the second part of our series, we examine how the media empire wields great influence at state level, where advisers say premiers seek to appease tabloids

Part one: A very Australian coup

News Corp has a distinctive culture – tribal, aggressive and centred around powerful editors – according to the accounts of former employees.

Peter Fray, the former Sydney Morning Herald editor and former deputy editor at the Australian, describes the difference between the news organisations this way: “Working for the Australian reminded me of being at the SMH when the Fairfax family controlled it.

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24. The great crash of 2008: how a crisis went to waste – Politics Weekly podcastЧт., 20 сент.[−]

What lessons have been learned a decade on from the financial crisis?

A decade on from the financial crisis and Britain is still counting the economic and political costs. Have lessons been learned? Culprits punished? Mistakes put right? Or are we doomed to repeat the great crash?

Joining Heather Stewart is Adam Tooze, author of Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World.

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25. Like shopping 30 years ago: first Jack’s customers sample new storeЧт., 20 сент.[−]

Tesco’s discount store sees feverish trade on opening day, but will the buzz keep shoppers away from Lidl and Aldi?

Heavy rain and winds did not deter bargain-hungry shoppers on the opening day of Tesco’s new discount chain, Jack’s, with long queues to enter the store and the car park overflowing.

At 10am on Thursday, the formal opening time, 150 people were waiting to enter the new supermarket in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire. The store is Tesco’s attempt to fend off the German discounters Aldi and Lidl.

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