The Guardian23:00 Текст источника в новой вкладке
Latest international news, sport and comment from the Guardian
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2019

 
 
1. Chelsea v Manchester United: FA Cup fifth round – live!22:53[−]

23 min: Hazard darts to the byline on the left, but Romero dives to claim the cross.

21 min: Young, attempting to exert a high press as Chelsea look to pass out from the back, steams into the back of Pedro on the right. He’s booked.

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2. Trump seeks to rally US-based Venezuelans against Nicol?s Maduro22:32[−]
  • President to speak at Florida International University in Miami
  • White House previews appeal to Venezuela military

Donald Trump will speak on Monday in the largest Venezuelan community in the US, seeking to rally support for the opposition leader, Juan Guaid?, and saying the South American country’s “current path toward democracy is irreversible”.

Related: Panama Papers ‘tightened the noose’ on offshore assets of Maduro’s inner circle

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3. New York to ban hairstyle policies that discriminate against black people22:17[−]

Human rights commission rules, believed to be first in US, target company and school policies that ban dreadlocks and other styles

New York City will ban discrimination based on hairstyles, a rule meant to stop policies that penalize black people.

The New York City Commission on Human Rights issued the new regulations on Monday. Believed to be the first in the US, they give African American New Yorkers the legal right to wear their hair in afros, cornrows, locks, twists, braids, Bantu knots and other styles.

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4. Dublin will not 'steamrolled' by UK, says Irish deputy PM22:16[−]

Simon Coveney reportedly clashed with Jeremy Hunt over UK’s alleged attempts to isolate Ireland

Jeremy Hunt was confronted over alleged British attempts to isolate Ireland from its EU partners by the country’s deputy prime minister during a meeting in Brussels on Monday, as tensions over the continuing Brexit impasse bubbled to the surface.

Ireland’s t?naiste, Simon Coveney raised “negative briefings” in a private meeting with the foreign secretary before later publicly expressing his frustration over a lack of progress, with fewer than 40 days to go until Brexit.

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5. Toto Wolff says no-deal Brexit would be ‘mother of all messes’ for F1 teams22:05[−]

• ‘It is the mother of all messes,’ says Mercedes team principal
• Blow for Williams as car will miss two full days testing

Toto Wolff has issued a strong warning of the dangers facing Formula One and the sport’s place in the UK because of Brexit, describing it as the “mother of all messes”. The Mercedes team principal was speaking as teams gave their cars their full track debut at the first test here. Ferrari were quickest but Williams suffered a severe blow, admitting they were not ready to run for the opening two days of testing.

Seven of the 10 F1 teams are based in Britain and there are nine European races this season. They employ a large number of people with a wide range of nationalities and are reliant on parts, equipment and materials coming in and out of the EU. Wolff warned Brexit would have a major impact.

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6. Catholic diocese of Oakland releases list of 45 men accused of sexual abuse21:43[−]

The Catholic diocese of Oakland has released the names of 45 priests, deacons and religious brothers who officials say are “credibly accused” of sexually abusing minors.

Related: The Catholic church is still making excuses for paedophilia | Peter Stanford

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7. ‘Mexico’s Alcatraz’ prison to be turned into a cultural centre21:21[−]

Hundreds of inmates will be transferred to make way for Walls of Water arts venue

Mexico is to close one of the world’s last remaining prison islands and turn it into a cultural centre named for a communist writer once held there.

The Mexican president, Andr?s Manuel L?pez Obrador, signed a declaration at his Monday morning press conference closing the federal prison on the Islas Mar?as, 60 miles off Mexico’s Pacific coast, saying he wanted to promote “more schools and fewer prisons”.

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8. Adil Rashid to play to his strengths against Chris Gayle and West Indies21:14[−]

• Leg-spinner is key part of Eoin Morgan’s ODI attack
• Moeen Ali believes Rashid can still be ‘world beater’ in Tests

There are 101 days to go until England’s World Cup campaign gets under way against South Africa at the Oval and one player who should thrive during the team’s exclusive diet of limited-overs matches until then is Adil Rashid.

Rashid’s 19 Test caps have returned fleeting success and after a low-key outing in Barbados last month – a defeat he might have sat out had England not bungled their selection – the leg-spinner returned home for the birth of his second son. This departure came with talk that his time in the longer format may be up.

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9. Caster Semenya’s lawyers accuse the IAAF of underhand tactics21:08[−]

• Claim that naming witnesses broke confidentiality
• Runner is challenging revised eligibility rule

Caster Semenya’s lawyers have accused the International Association of Athletics Federations of using underhand tactics to gain public support at the start of their contentious dispute at the court of arbitration for sport in Lausanne.

Related: Court has Semenya’s career in its hands – and decision could affect all of sport | Sean Ingle

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10. London fashion week: shafts of light to the heavy weight of history20:57[−]

Contrasting shows from Roksanda and Erdem have immediate appeal

Orange is not traditionally worn with raspberry, nor caramel with tangerine, but they make perfect sense to designer Roksanda Ilin?i?. “We live in a world of crazy contrast,” she said with a shrug backstage after her London fashion week show on Monday morning. “We all feel that, I think, and it creates a lot of anxiety.”

Ilin?i?, who begins each collection by sifting through her “precious box of colours – swatches of fabrics, images from books, postcards”, has a gift for finding beauty in the crazy contrasts. “I like putting together colours that are not supposed to go together,” she said.

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11. George Mendonsa, The Kissing Sailor in famous photograph, dies at 9520:49[−]

Alfred Eisenstaedt photographed sailor kissing Greta Friedman in Times Square at the end of the second world war

George Mendonsa, the sailor who was captured in a famous photograph kissing a woman in Times Square amidst celebrations of the end of the second world war, has died. He was 95.

His daughter, Sharon Molleur, told the Providence Journal her father fell and had a seizure early on Sunday at the assisted living facility in Middletown, Rhode Island, where he lived with his wife of 70 years. He died two days before his 96th birthday.

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12. Hoda Muthana wants to help US deradicalise others, says lawyer20:48[−]

US woman who fled Isis after being vocal proponent ‘could be useful to protect others’

The lawyer for Hoda Muthana, the US woman who fled Islamic State and now wants to return home, has called for her to be a voice of a deradicalisation programme that dissuades others from joining the terror group and counters online manipulation.

Hassan Shibly, an attorney who has represent Hoda’s family in the four years since she left her home in Alabama for Syria, says Muthana, 24, is prepared to face the US justice system.

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13. DNA on napkin leads to murder charge in 25-year-old case20:20[−]

Minnesota investigators used genealogy website in case of Jeanne Ann Childs’ 1993 death

A Minnesota businessman has been charged in a 25-year-old murder case, after investigators ran crime scene DNA evidence through a genealogy website then obtained the suspect’s DNA from a napkin thrown away at a hockey rink.

Jerry Westrom, 52, was charged with second-degree murder in the 1993 death of 35-year-old Jeanne Ann “Jeanie” Childs in Minneapolis, a case that had gone cold.

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14. 'So many lies': Trump attacks McCabe over explosive CBS interview20:20[−]

Donald Trump returned to the attack against Andrew McCabe on Monday, in response to an interview in which the former deputy FBI director discussed his new book and made claims damaging to the president.

Related: 'I believe Putin': Trump dismissed US advice on North Korea threat, says McCabe

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15. Tom Watson urges colleagues not to call resigning MPs traitors19:45[−]

Labour deputy leader says party could face even bigger split after seven MPs quit

Tom Watson, the deputy Labour leader, has said his party faces an even more severe split if it denounces the seven MPs who quit as traitors instead of addressing the reasons for their departure.

In an emotional statement, Watson said he sometimes “no longer recognises” his own party, as he called on colleagues not to adopt the language of betrayal towards the seven who resigned on Monday.

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16. What celebrity reaction to Calvin Klein’s new ads tells us about social media19:42[−]

J-Lo is ‘thirsting’ over Shawn Mendes in his undies on Instagram – and such in-jokes are becoming an internet spectator sport

Calvin Klein has released its underwear campaign eight weeks into 2019, which feels inherently cruel – anyone used their NutriBullet recently? But you have to flog underwear while the sun shines, as the adage goes, and the fashion brand has roped in the dewy-skinned pop good boy Shawn Mendes to front its new campaign.

For a brand that built its image on raw sex appeal – see Kate Moss, Marky Mark, Trevante Rhodes – getting a sweet-natured cherub such as Mendes may have been a curveball, but it successfully got tongues wagging. Particularly those of other celebs.

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17. Klopp: Liverpool fans would rather win title than Champions League19:03[−]

• Manager talking on eve of last-16 meeting with Bayern Munich
• Klopp ‘clear’ Premier League success is what fans want most

J?rgen Klopp has no doubt Liverpool fans would prefer winning the Premier League to the Champions League as the team prepare for their European tie against Bayern Munich.

Liverpool, who last won the English top flight in 1990, are second in their domestic league on goal difference to Manchester City, who have played a game more.

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18. Points of order: how to choose the right wine for your meal19:00[−]

Trouble choosing the right bottle in a restaurant? Taking three menus, our wine expert offers tips for happy drinking that won’t break the bank

There are a handful of obvious questions anyone should be asking when presented with a wine list. But unless – like Cristiano Ronaldo during his recent visit to glitzy Mayfair seafood restaurant Scott’s – you’re untroubled by the prospect of shelling out ?18,000 for a bottle of Richebourg Grand Cru, the most pressing will always be: “How much do I want to spend here?”

Being clear – and firm – about your budget will curb any urge on the part of your sommelier to – in the industry lingo – “upsell” you something you can’t afford. And, contrary to stubborn popular belief, if that budget only stretches as far as the house wine (or that ever-popular “second-cheapest wine on the list”) that needn’t mean you’re in for a night of bad plonk and disdain. Whether it’s part of a pizza chain or Michelin-starred, any decent restaurant will know that the house wines are their most important bottles, the ones by which customers will judge them. Consequently, they put a lot of effort into getting them right, and are proud of them.

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19. Wake up, humanity! A hi-tech dystopian future is not inevitable | Steven Poole18:53[−]

As Airbus’s cancelled superjumbo shows, technological progress is not compulsory – we can choose to call a halt

When is the future no longer the future? Only a decade ago, air travel seemed to be moving ineluctably towards giant planes, or “superjumbos”. But last week Airbus announced it will cease manufacturing its A380, the world’s fattest passenger jet, as current trends favour smaller and more fuel-efficient craft. Progress changed course. A more vivid reminder of lost dreams will come in a few weeks: 2 March marks the 50th anniversary of the maiden flight of Concorde. Once upon a time, all aviation was going to be supersonic. But sometimes, the future is cancelled.

What if what we think is going to be the future right now is cancelled in its turn? We are supposedly on an unstoppable path towards driverless vehicles, fully automated internet-connected “smart homes”, and godlike artificial intelligence – but, then, we’ve been promised flying cars for half a century, and they are still (allegedly) just around the corner. We live in a time when technological change is portrayed as an inexorable, impersonal force: we’d better learn how to surf the tsunami or drown. But as a society, we always have a choice about which direction we take next. And sometimes we make the wrong decision.

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20. 'Air Cocaine' drug-trafficking trial begins in France18:50[−]

Two former military pilots, a customs officer and celebrity bodyguard among the accused

Sitting on the asphalt at Punta Cana international airport in the Dominican Republic, the private plane was about to take off for an overnight flight to Saint-Tropez in France when police swooped.

Inside the aircraft, a Dassault Falcon 50, officers found four Frenchmen – two pilots and two passengers – along with 680kg of cocaine, with an estimated street value of €20m (?17.5m), in 26 battered suitcases.

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21. Fear and loathing without Aspas as 'pathetic' Celta drift towards the rocks | Sid Lowe18:29[−]

Their talisman is injured and Celta Vigo are slumping badly at the wrong time, just as others are arresting their slides

Celta de Vigo’s fans saw hope disappear before their eyes. An hour had gone and Jos? Luis Morales had just scored Levante’s third but it wasn’t only what was happening on the pitch that brought the fatalism flooding back at Bala?dos, it was what was happening alongside it. There had been applause and anticipation when Iago Aspas, their captain and their everything, stepped into the sunlight and began warming up, tracksuit off ready to return after six weeks away; now there was silence as he ducked into the shadows and sat down again, worry and resignation written across his face and theirs.

Back on the bench, boots off, mission aborted, Aspas watched powerless as the fans clapped Morales and whistled everyone else. He watched team-mates argue over an irrelevant 88th-minute penalty to make it 1-3, the tiniest flicker of life immediately extinguished when Borja Mayoral scored Levante’s fourth seconds later. He listened to supporters call for the president to resign – which is exactly what Carlos Mouri?o, pointedly ignoring the mayor up in the directors’ box, would do if he could find someone to pay him enough to buy the club. And he watched another defeat and more disillusion, the final whistle blown to emptying stands. While he watched, he occasionally reached down and rubbed his calf.

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22. The Guardian view on the Labour split: a mistake but also a warning | Editorial18:14[−]

The party has always been a broad church, and it must remain one if it is to form an effective opposition and government

Monday morning’s resignations by seven Labour MPs are a mistake, but they are also a warning. Like it or not, and a few on all wings have always disliked it, the Labour party is not a centralist party. It has always contained, and has been able to contain, a mix of political traditions. Most fundamentally of all, it has long been a coalition of organised labour and various mainstream socialist and social democratic traditions. Arguments have often been fierce, but they have mostly taken place within a large tent. After nearly 120 years of the party’s history, that is still, for the moment, the case.

At various times in this progress the party has tacked more decisively in one direction or another, putting that mix under pressure. Over the last century, Britain has also changed in fundamental ways that challenge the party – any party – to adapt or perish. Yet, by and large, Labour activists, interests and voters have managed to remain, if not united, then at least broadly agreed on a common purpose. That purpose is, overwhelmingly, the election of Labour governments that can redress the imbalance of economic, social and political power in Britain. That broad-church approach has served Labour well and has served Britain well too.

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23. Merkel successor cleans up as Putzfrau Gretel in carnival role18:07[−]

Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer reprises role as cleaning lady during festivities in home state of Saarland

Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, the leader of Germany’s Christian Democrat party, returned to her home state of Saarland over the weekend to reprise her annual role as Putzfrau Gretel (Gretel the cleaning lady) during carnival celebrations.

Dressed in an apron and checkered headscarf, Kramp-Karrenbauer cracked jokes about December’s CDU leadership election, the fight banning diesel vehicles and political dysfunction in Berlin in front of a crowd of more than a thousand people.

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24. Rampant sex and risque stories: why Mistresses is ripe for a remake18:03[−]

The groundbreaking BBC drama is being remade for Japanese TV. It is a welcome return for four excellent female characters

Japanese TV is on the hunt for strong female leads and they don’t come much tougher than the four women of Mistresses. Years before female-powered programmes from Scott & Bailey to Fleabag displayed every facet of women’s lives, the BBC One drama was groundbreaking.

Mistresses was unleashed in the post-Sex and the City but pre-#MeToo era and at its height would pick up just over five million viewers (which is respectable). At that time, any show featuring four women who ate lunch together was dubbed “the British S&TC”, but the drama was more than that. These women weren’t fitting work around a whirlwind of dates. They were juggling careers, family and everything in between, and still finding time for their rampant sex lives (mostly with husbands who were not their own). Lunchtime chardonnay and a thirst for lust made it surprisingly risque viewing, but the Mistresses weren’t having affairs just for the fun of it.

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25. Inside Labour's lonely hearts club band | John Crace17:53[−]

Breaking up is hard to do, especially when you don’t know what you stand for

It was always going to be a race to see which party split first. And when push came to shove it was Labour that beat the Tories to it. Monday morning during half-term week in the etc. venue of London’s County Hall might not be everyone’s idea of a good time to launch a new party. The Etc Declaration doesn’t have quite the same ring as the SDP’s Limehouse Declaration of 1981. Despite this, the airless, corporate fourth-floor meeting room was rammed half an hour before the new Labour breakaway supergroup appeared.

Related: Seven MPs quit Labour in protest over Corbyn's leadership

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26. New novel about Dr James Barry sparks row over Victorian's gender identity17:46[−]

The Cape Doctor by EJ Levy, which describes the individual born Margaret Ann Bulkley as ‘a heroine’, has been accused of disrespecting gender identity

A debate about the gender identity of Dr James Barry, the pioneering Victorian who adopted a male persona to become the UK’s first female-born doctor, has erupted after the award-winning author EJ Levy was accused of disrespecting Barry’s legacy by using female pronouns in a forthcoming novel.

Levy announced last week that she had sold a novel about the “true story” of Barry, titled The Cape Doctor. The forthcoming book, which will be released by Little, Brown, will trace Barry’s life story: born Margaret Ann Bulkley in Ireland, the future doctor became Barry at the age of 20 and left for Edinburgh to study medicine as a man. Barry joined the army after graduation, the start of a distinguished career as a military surgeon that spanned Cape Town, St Helena and Trinidad and Tobago. In 1865, Barry returned to the UK with dysentery, and died. A maid discovered the doctor’s biological gender after the death.

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27. Reporter Jason Rezaian on 544 days in Iranian jail: ‘They never touched me – but I was tortured’17:27[−]

The Iranian-American Washington Post journalist reveals the psychological scars his 2014 imprisonment left him with

Three years after being released from an Iranian prison, Jason Rezaian can still not quite shake off a recurring bad dream. It no longer dogs him several times a week as it did in the early days after his release, but it still revisits him, often after he has been retelling his tale. And it never changes.

“It’s not a nightmare of somebody beating me and trying to chase me down,” says Rezaian, a Washington Post journalist now back in his newspaper’s home town. “It is: you were supposed to get out and you didn’t. There was this moment you were supposed to be released and for whatever reason, that didn’t happen.”

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28. Chinese surveillance company tracking 2.5m Xinjiang residents17:25[−]

Internet expert exposes unsecured database believed to be targeting Muslim minorities

A Chinese surveillance company has been tracking the movements of at least 2.5 million residents in a province where Muslim minorities have been the target of a far-reaching security clampdown, internet experts have found.

Victor Gevers, of the non-profit group GDI.Foundation, which supports an open internet, discovered an unsecured database online that contained the name, sex, ethnicity, ID number, birth date and employer of residents in China’s western province of Xinjiang.

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29. Cold Feet has finally become must-watch TV ... 22 years after it started17:18[−]

The drama about middle-class Mancunians has hit its stride at long last – thanks largely to a love affair that’s been bubbling under since the 90s

When ITV first announced Cold Feet would be coming back after a 13-year absence, I was deeply sceptical. I enjoyed Mike Bullen’s tale of middle-class Mancunians, but by the time it finished in 2003 it felt less like an old friend you loved spending time with and more like an unwanted guest who lingers long after the party has come to a natural close.

Times, and television, had moved on. Surely resurrecting Cold Feet was just another example of a channel scraping the barrel by rehashing the past instead of coming up with something new? Well, I hold my hands up and admit it: I was wrong.

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30. What are Brexit contingency plans for aerospace and defence?17:00[−]

With no deal estimated to mean billions of pounds in extra costs, here’s what firms are doing

The British aerospace sector is bracing for a no-deal Brexit, which it estimates could mean billions of pounds in extra costs.

The impact on some goods could equate to 38% of their sale value, according to one no-deal Brexit scenario modelled by ADS, a lobby group for the aerospace and defence sectors.

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31. Swedish student fined for anti-deportation protest that went viral16:59[−]

Elin Ersson received a ?250 fine for refusing to take her seat on a plane in Sweden last year

A Swedish student who livestreamed her protest against the deportation of an Afghan asylum seeker last year has been found guilty of violating Sweden’s aviation laws and fined ?250.

Elin Ersson, 22, avoided a prison sentence at the Gothenburg district court, where she was sentenced to a fine of 3,000 Swedish krona.

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32. EU parliament's centrist coalition set to lose majority, poll finds16:58[−]

European People’s party and Socialists & Democrats have run parliament for 40 years

The “grand coalition” of centre-right and centre-left that has run the European parliament for 40 years is set to lose its majority for the first time following elections in May, according to the institution’s internal forecasts.

The centre-right European People’s party and centre-left Socialists & Democrats have long called the shots in the EU parliament, but polls suggest the two big groups will win only 45% of seats, down from 53%.

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33. Stop the online conspiracy theorists before they break democracy | Julia Ebner16:47[−]
Cannibals, aliens and clandestine lizard overlords: thanks to algorithms, such ideas threaten the future of Europe

Organised conspiracy theorist networks have launched an all-out information war across Europe. At the heart of this is the QAnon movement. It expanded from the US to Europe and the UK at rapid speed, hijacking political debates on social media as well as mass protests in the streets in recent months. Our new analysis at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue shows that European conspiracy theorists run increasingly sophisticated campaigns around critical junctions in national, regional and global politics. They even carried out social media operations to influence voters in German state elections, including the 2018 election in Bavaria.

The QAnon community, which began on the message-board site 4chan, strongly overlaps with the support networks of far-right movements such as the EDL and Pegida. Most recently, it co-opted yellow vest demonstrations and boosted hardline Brexit campaigns and Tommy Robinson protests. By injecting conspiratorial narratives into these movements, its members can leverage existing networks and alter their political direction. A commonly used tactic is to combine conspiricist hashtags with those of viral campaigns and trending topics. The scale this generates is disproportional enough to distort public perception: In 2018, ISD identified close to 30m uses of the word “QAnon” across Twitter, YouTube and forums such as Reddit and 4chan.

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34. 'I almost died': arms dealer whose poisoning may be linked to Skripals'16:46[−]

Russian agent allegedly in Bulgaria when Emilian Gebrev poisoned in 2015 and in UK when Skripals attacked

The first sign that something was wrong with Emilian Gebrev was an itchy, bloodshot eye after a dinner in April 2015. The next day he had strange visions of flashing lasers, followed by uncontrollable vomiting. As friends rushed him to hospital, everything went black and he slipped into a coma.

Related: Skripal poisoning: UK team looks into possible Bulgarian case link

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35. Trump's 'bring jihadists home' call gets mixed response in Europe16:35[−]

Germany will put fighters on trial, while Hungary says they should not be allowed back

Donald Trump’s demand that Germany, France and Britain repatriate and prosecute their citizens fighting in Syria has met a mixed response in Europe as countries baulk at the difficulties involved in taking back hundreds of alleged jihadists.

Germany pledged on Monday to put its foreign fighters on trial, but warned their repatriation would be “extremely difficult”, while France said it would not act for now on Trump’s call but would take militants back “case by case”.

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36. A violinist on the beach and an elephant drinking: Monday’s best photos16:33[−]

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you photo highlights from around the world

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37. Summit cancelled as Israel and Poland row over Holocaust16:12[−]

Israeli foreign minister accuses Poles of hatred towards Jews in remarks described as ‘racist’ by Polish PM

Poland’s prime minister has accused Israel’s foreign minister of racism in an escalating diplomatic row over the Holocaust that resulted in the cancellation on Monday of an international summit in Jerusalem.

Mateusz Morawiecki withdrew his country’s involvement in the summit after Yisrael Katz, who was appointed acting Israeli foreign minister on Sunday, said Poles “suckle antisemitism with their mother’s milk” and accused all Polish people of harbouring “innate” antisemitism.

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38. Final days of the 'Isis caliphate' – photo essay16:06[−]

Photojournalist Achilleas Zavallis has been in Syria covering the collapse of Islamic State across the region and the resultant displacement of families

For the past week the Syrian Democratic Forces have been trying to defeat the last remnants of Islamic State that fortified themselves in the small town located on the banks of the Euphrates River, near the Iraqi border.

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39. Mauro Icardi, Internazionale and the return of unwelcome headlines | Paolo Bandini15:54[−]

Inter dug deep to see off Sampdoria, but without their forward after he was stripped of the captaincy

The first time the big screen cut to Mauro Icardi, it stayed with him for only a few seconds. He had arrived just before kick-off for Inter’s game against Sampdoria, taking a seat beside his wife, and agent, Wanda in the stands at San Siro. Neither seemed to notice when the cameras picked them out, provoking brief jeers from the home crowd.

But the camera lingered a little longer the second time around. Play had stopped, and the mood inside the stadium was restless, with the score still lgoalless after the interval. This time the whistles were ear-splitting. Wanda glanced up at the screen, and quickly cast her eyes back down.

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40. Naomi Osaka: split with coach was refusal to put ‘success over happiness’15:31[−]
• Two-time slam champion parted with Sascha Bajin this month
• World No 1 said rumours of money issues are ‘hurtful’

Naomi Osaka is adamant that her surprise split with the coach Sascha Bajin had nothing to do with money but was because she refused to put “success over happiness”.

The German had guided the Japanese player to back-to-back grand slam titles as well as to the summit of the WTA rankings, rising from No 72 at the start of 2018 to No 1. But only two weeks after her win at Melbourne Park, Osaka abruptly severed ties with Bajin. That led to suggestions the two had fallen out over money.

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41. City of stairs: the interconnecting walkways of Hong Kong15:13[−]

Hans Leo Maes captures the bridges and stairways that link up the hilly, population-dense city

Hong Kong is known for its flashing lights, neon signs and high-rise skylines. But the architect and photographer Hans Leo Maes documents an alternative side – the city’s interconnecting staircases and bridges.

“The extreme population density in Hong Kong means [structures] are stacked and linked by stairs, often external and very visible,” Maes says.

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42. Daughter of Mao Zedong’s personal secretary boycotts funeral15:12[−]

Nanyang Li says Communist party ceremony is taking place against wishes of her father Li Rui

The daughter of Mao Zedong’s personal secretary is boycotting her father’s funeral, which she says is taking place against his wishes in a cemetery reserved for high-ranking revolutionary figures.

According to Nanyang Li, her father Li Rui will be interred in the Babaoshan cemetery on Wednesday in an official ceremony at which the Chinese flag will be draped over his casket.

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43. Super-tall, super-skinny, super-expensive: the 'pencil towers' of New York's super-rich – podcast15:00[−]

An extreme concentration of wealth in a city where even the air is for sale has produced a new breed of needle-like tower

Read the text version here

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44. Rave on: spring menswear inspired by the dancefloor – in pictures15:00[−]

Lasers, Quavers, tracksuits and trainers – this season, men’s fashion is in a trance. Let us guide you towards the light with these high-fashion looks

  • Read more from the spring/summer 2019 edition of The Fashion, our biannual fashion supplement
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45. Rachel Roddy’s recipe for red cabbage, sausage and white bean soup | A Kitchen in Rome15:00[−]

A multilayered and warming dish based on the mountain soup-stews of eastern Piedmont

After Christmas and new year, and three large batches of braised red cabbage, a disproportionate amount of which – due to greed and responsibility – I ate, I swore never to cook or eat red cabbage again. How quickly I forget. A month later and I am in the supermarket, quite literally weighing up two bald heads of cabbage, deep purple and polished, each with a bulging vein-like rib curving down one side. It is a cliche I know, but nevertheless true, that many Italians – especially those over 50 from Rome and southwards – find it impossible not to comment on young children, damp hair and food shopping, especially if you are standing with hands like a weighing scale looking indecisive.

Questo” (“that one”), said a smart 50-something man in a green puffy gilet and jaunty scarf, choosing carrots as if something of upmost importance depended on it. He then went on to tell me he couldn’t eat red cabbage because it gave him terrible and painful wind, and that cooking it makes the house smell.

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46. Facebook is out of control and politicians have no idea what to do | Simon Jenkins14:07[−]
A Commons report lays bare horrifying abuses. But the UK is no closer to regulating the far-too-powerful tech industry

Death threats, bullying, mental torture, privacy invasion, election rigging, fake news, monopoly abuse: as was said of a medieval pope, this is merely to suppress more serious charges. It is hard to recall the social media of 15 years ago and its offer of universal love, democracy and global peace. Britain’s parliament has finally caught up, and today’s Commons report is at least unequivocal. A menace stalks the land, and must be curbed.

Some of the report’s accusations are astonishing. Facebook “purposefully obstructed” the committee. Its boss, Mark Zuckerberg, who “continues to choose profit over data security,” held parliament in contempt. His rambling empire is portrayed as lying, thieving “digital gangsterism”. Yet British electoral law is puny. It is “unfit for purpose,” leaving elections “vulnerable to foreign influence, disinformation and voter manipulation”. Not a week passes without evidence that cybersecurity is inadequate and public services have been left vulnerable to hacking.

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47. Facebook needs regulation to combat fake news, say MPs13:53[−]

Damian Collins warns of ‘deepfake films’ showing doctored footage of politicians

Online disinformation is only going to get more sophisticated, the chair of the committee investigating disinformation and fake news, Damian Collins, has warned.

Related: Facebook labelled 'digital gangsters' by report on fake news

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48. Why Vice should win the best picture Oscar13:50[−]

Best film of the year – or worst? Opinion is deeply divided, but the Dick Cheney biopic, starring a chunky Christian Bale, is as hilarious as it is grotesque

The Favourite, Black Panther, Roma and more: read the rest of our best picture Oscar hustings

It’s difficult to remember an Oscar nominee that prompted a range of reactions quite like Vice, Adam McKay’s account of the squalid rise to power of George W Bush’s right-hand-man Dick Cheney. Some people think it’s the year’s best film, others think its among the worst, and others still reckon it’s a threat to the very notion of truth itself. Small wonder then that a movie this polarising is unlikely to become the consensus pick for the best picture Oscar: you can get odds as long as 125/1 for a Vice win.

Here’s the thing though: Vice’s very contentiousness is the reason that it would make an interesting and timely best picture winner. This is a film that is designed to stir the pot, to rattle cages, to instigate uncomfortable heated arguments in cinema lobbies. It’s a film that instead of blandly asking, “Why can’t we just get along” explains bluntly why we don’t.

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49. Chasing rainbows: inside the battle between Radiohead and EMI's Guy Hands13:00[−]

A new book details the saga of private equity company Terra Firma acquiring EMI in August 2007 for ?4.2bn. This extract details the battle over Radiohead’s seventh album

On Sunday 30 September 2007, just hours before the calendar flipped into Q4 and marked the start of the major labels’ busiest and most profitable retail period, Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood posted a message on the band’s Dead Air Space blog. “Hello everyone,” he wrote. “Well, the new album is finished, and it’s coming out in 10 days. We’ve called it In Rainbows. Love from us all.”

This seemingly blas? post to announce their seventh studio album was followed up by the details of the release. When it became clear what precisely they were doing, all hell broke loose – not just within EMI but across the entire record business.

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50. Our sex life is so repetitive I have to imagine arousing situations in bed13:00[−]

We seem to be doing the same thing again and again and it has left me feeling bored. I’m making excuses to avoid sex even though I enjoy it

I love my boyfriend passionately. We had a great sex life until a few months ago, when I started to feel as if we were doing the same thing again and again. Now I have trouble initiating sex because of this feeling of numbness, which he told me he sometimes feels, too. I feel as if he doesn’t know how to push my buttons, and I don’t know how to guide him. I really enjoy our foreplay and intercourse, but the beginning is very difficult and doesn’t feel spontaneous at all. I find myself making excuses to avoid sex because I’m afraid it’s going to happen again. When we do have sex, I have to think intensely about arousing situations to overcome the numbness. It’s exhausting and depressing.

Maintaining one’s erotic spark is always a challenge. Sometimes the task is simply to correct the sexual malaise that tends to arise due to such factors as stress, worries about money or caring for young children. Sometimes low sexual drive – or even specific sexual problems – can be caused by relationship issues or medical conditions, or can be side effects of certain medications. But very often, sex simply becomes too repetitive. This can be changed if both partners are able and willing to talk frankly, to ask clearly for what they each want, and to make changes. In your case, it sounds as though you tend to be the initiator of sex, and if so you may have become burned out from taking this role. This is a common problem. Request a role-reversal, so that he starts to initiate, and be brave enough to tell him exactly what would best please you. Be encouraging, non-blaming and very specific, and praise him for his attempts. You will also need to relinquish the control you take as initiator, and learn to be a receiver of pleasure.

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51. Indian soldiers die in Kashmir gun battle as tensions escalate12:50[−]

Indian soldiers and militants killed in hunt for perpetrators of paramilitary convoy attack

Four Indian soldiers and two militants have been killed in clashes in disputed Kashmir as security personnel hunt for members of an insurgent group that killed at least 40 paramilitaries last week.

Police said they were fired on by militants as they searched a village in Kashmir’s southern Pulwama district, close to where a car laden with explosives rammed a paramilitary convoy on Thursday.

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52. Panama Papers ‘tightened the noose’ on offshore assets of Maduro’s inner circle12:00[−]

In the wake of the scandal, it became harder to launder money through investment in Panamanian real estate for Venezuelans who grew rich on the back of their political connections

On Avenida Balboa, Panama City’s premier seafront avenue, the 50 story tower blocks form a near continuous wall of glass to the Pacific Ocean. At night, however, most of the luxury apartments remain in darkness and the basement casinos are eerily deserted.

Panamanian real estate was a favourite investment of the boliburgues, Venezuelans who grew rich on the back of their political connections to the late president Hugo Ch?vez and his successor Nicol?s Maduro.

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53. 'I do an autopsy on someone who is almost unrecognisable as a person'11:00[−]

Carrying out post-mortems in mortuaries can be difficult and very emotional. I always afford patients as much dignity as I can

I am involved in the autopsy of a person who has died in an explosion and who is almost unrecognisable as a human being. As the forensic pathologist seeks to document each mark and injury, and to determine the exact cause of death I, in my role as an anatomical pathology technician, think about what I can do to attempt a reconstruction.

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54. Colombia's homemade prosthetics – in pictures10:00[−]

Since 1992, more than 11,500 Colombians have been killed or injured by landmines, a legacy of more than 50 years of internal conflict. Many impoverished amputees without access to the healthcare system have resorted to making homemade prosthetics from wood, leather, metal and plastic bottles

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55. 'Stumbling stones': a different vision of Holocaust remembrance10:00[−]

A German artist has now laid more than 70,000 Stolpersteine stones, making them the world’s largest decentralised monument to the Holocaust – but not everyone approves

On a recent winter afternoon, several dozen residents of Duisburger Strasse in Berlin huddled together to commemorate the people on their street who died in the Holocaust. To Volker Spitzenberger, who has lived here since 2010 with his husband, the stories of local residents killed by the Nazis were a chilling reminder of past atrocities – but none more so than when the organiser mentioned Manfred Hirsch, a young boy who was deported at the age of four from the house at No 18.

“That’s our house,” Spitzenberger said, with a sharp intake of breath.

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56. Why Trump and his team want to wipe out the EU | Natalie Nougayr?de09:00[−]

Mike Pompeo’s wooing of eastern European states is an attack on the union’s very existence, and part of a wider ideological battle

The Trump administration not only dislikes the European Union, it is out to destroy it. The trip by the US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, to Europe last week was episode three of the onslaught, designed to play on east-west divisions within the EU. Episode one was Donald Trump’s 2017 Warsaw speech, infused with nativist nationalism. Episode two was Trump’s 2018 moves on tariffs, and his tearing up of key agreements such as the Iran nuclear deal and the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty. To which should be added his open encouragements to Brexiteers, and his decision to pull out of Syria. All of the above affect European (including British) interests in very concrete ways, unlike mere tweets or insults thrown at allies.

Europe is trying to put up a resistance. Angela Merkel, Trump’s favourite political target in the EU, received a standing ovation on Saturday at the annual Munich security conference for her speech on the virtues of multilateralism. But perhaps we have yet to fully fathom what the EU is dealing with in this new Trump era. The man now whispering into Trump’s ears is John Bolton, his national security adviser. His brand of anti-EU ideology was on full display during Pompeo’s tour of Budapest, Bratislava and Warsaw.

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57. Black Panthers in the 1960s: a rare intimate look – in pictures09:00[−]

An exhibition at the San Francisco Art Institute takes a new look at Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch’s controversial 1968 photo essay, which sought to enhance public understanding of the Black Panthers

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58. 'I know what intolerance looks like': Ilhan Omar takes her turn in the spotlight09:00[−]

The Minnesota congresswoman faced fire over Israel and fury over her treatment of Trump official Elliott Abrams

Ilhan Omar made history in January when she became the first Somali American and one of the first Muslim women sworn into the US Congress.

Related: Democratic party elites silence Ilhan Omar at their peril | Trita Parsi and Stephen Wertheim

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59. Burned out and overwhelmed: should you embrace the joy of no?08:59[−]

Once we were pressured to acquire things and do more with our lives. Now, we’re being told to declutter our homes and diaries. What happened to just being ourselves?

What brings you joy? It is a question that is hard to avoid these days, as joy seems to be the new buzzword. It is on the cover of two new books, The Joy of No (#Jono) by Debbie Chapman, published at the end of last year, and The Joy of Missing Out, by the philosopher and psychologist Svend Brinkmann, published earlier this month. It is also on Netflix, in the show Tidying Up with Marie Kondo, in which the decluttering guru and author tells us to discard any possessions that do not “spark joy”. Truly, a surfeit of joy!

But joy is not the only idea linking these three approaches: Chapman, Brinkmann and Kondo all tap into the same zeitgeisty wish to clean up our cluttered lives. For Kondo, it is about household clutter; for Chapman and Brinkmann, it is life clutter.

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60. What a European education project can tell us about Brexit – podcast06:00[−]

When the writer Peter Pomerantsev was a teenager, he was sent to a school that was part of the European Schools network, which counts Boris Johnson among its alumni. He discusses what the project can tell us about the EU. Plus: the Guardian’s UK technology editor, Alex Hern, on AI advancements

The writer Peter Pomerantsev was 15 when his parents moved to Germany and enrolled him at the European School in Munich. The schools were set up in 1956 with the aim of educating the students to be “in mind Europeans, schooled and ready to complete and consolidate the work of their fathers before them, to bring into being a united and thriving Europe”. One of the architects of Brexit, Boris Johnson, attended one of the schools, in Brussels.

Pomerantsev discusses with Anuskha Asthana his experiences at the school and what the project tells us about the EU. He wonders whether the school successfully promoted integration, or actually had the opposite effect.

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61. John Grant: ‘Music has been a healing balm for me’Вс., 17 февр.[−]

The musician, 50, on his anger problem, coming out, and why he’s glad he contracted HIV

Nowhere really feels like home. Whenever I move somewhere new, I call it a new backdrop for my bullshit. I’ve lived in Iceland for about seven years and I’ve got a flat in Reykjavik that I’ve just started to put pictures up in after a year of living there. I think the closest I feel to home is on the tour bus. I’m like a bowerbird. I build my nest wherever I go.

My childhood was filled with dread. There was this rising fear that something wasn’t OK – that being my sexuality. I knew it was going to be a big problem. Because I’m from a religious background, I had to think about things like eternal damnation. Pretty heavy stuff for a child. But I try really hard to remember that there were some idyllic moments, too. Playing football on the field or watching the lightning bugs in the summer. I try to capture those feelings in my music. How I felt before I learned what the world was really like. Music has been like a healing balm for me. I know I can always find joy there.

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62. Look lively: fashion’s take on survivalist style – in picturesВс., 17 февр.[−]

Want to be prepared this season? From belt bags to rain-ready gear, high-fashion has stylish answers for all eventualities

  • Read more from the spring/summer 2019 edition of The Fashion, our biannual fashion supplement
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63. Is the era of artificial speech translation upon us?Вс., 17 февр.[−]

Once the stuff of science fiction, technology that enables people to talk using different languages is now here. But how effective is it?

Noise, Alex Waibel tells me, is one of the major challenges that artificial speech translation has to meet. A device may be able to recognise speech in a laboratory, or a meeting room, but will struggle to cope with the kind of background noise I can hear surrounding Prof essor Waibel as he speaks to me from Kyoto station. I’m struggling to follow him in English, on a scratchy line that reminds me we are nearly 10,000km apart – and that distance is still an obstacle to communication even if you’re speaking the same language. We haven’t reached the future yet.

If we had, Waibel would have been able to speak in his native German and I would have been able to hear his words in English. He would also be able to converse hands-free and seamlessly with the Japanese people around him, with all parties speaking their native language.

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64. Lee Radziwill: a life in picturesСб., 16 февр.[−]

Radziwill, the younger sister of Jackie Kennedy, has died at the age of 85. Married three times, she was a well-known socialite and a successful interior designer

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65. Immigration images: protest and partying in Paris and LondonСб., 16 февр.[−]

A new exhibition at the Mus?e National de l’Histoire de l’Immigration celebrates the potent mix of migration, music, anti-racism and political activism that reshaped the cultures of France and Britain since the early sixties

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66. The Breadmaker: on the frontline of Venezuela's bakery wars – videoПт., 15 февр.[−]

In the midst of Venezuela’s spiralling economic crisis, Natalia and fellow members of a Chavista collective have stepped in to take over production at a local bakery, La Minka. Authorities had suspended operations when the owners were accused of overpricing their loaves and hoarding flour. In March 2017, with the tacit support of the government, the collective began selling affordable bread. This is the story of their fight to safeguard the bakery’s future and keep the Chavista dream alive

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67. Did air pollution kill nine-year-old Ella?Пт., 15 февр.[−]

This Friday marks six years since Ella Kissi-Debrah’s death, which her mother believes was partly caused by air pollution. Plus: 15-year-old George Bond explains why he is going on today’s school climate strike

Ella Kissi-Debrah lived 25 metres (82ft) from the heavily polluted South Circular Road in Lewisham, London. She died in February 2013 at the age of nine after three years of seizures and 27 visits to hospital for asthma attacks. Until the end of 2010, Ella had been in good health. An expert last year linked her death to the dangerously high levels of pollution from diesel traffic that breached legal limits.

Anushka Asthana talks to Rosamund Kissi-Debrah, Ella’s mother, about her fight to reopen the inquest so that air pollution can be recognised as a contributing factor to her death. Asthana also talks to Jocelyn Cockburn, the lawyer who represents Kissi-Debrah. Cockburn hopes an inquest will provide a better understanding of whether Ella’s death was avoidable and force the government and other bodies to account for their inaction over air pollution.

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68. Selling a kidney to reach EuropeЧт., 14 февр.[−]

Desperate to reach Europe, people from Africa are travelling to Egypt and selling body parts to pay for their onward passage. Se?n Columb has spent more than five years researching this subject. Plus: Ruth Maclean on Nigeria’s upcoming elections

Desperate to reach Europe, people from Africa are travelling to Egypt and selling body parts to pay for their onward passage. According to a 2018 report, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime has collected data on 700 incidents of organ trafficking, primarily from north Africa and the Middle East. These figures are conservative at best. The true scale of the industry is difficult to assess as the majority of cases go unreported, with victims reluctant to come forward for fear of deportation, arrest or shame.

Se?n Columb spent five years researching and interviewing victims of organ trafficking, as well as the brokers who organise the operations. He discusses with India Rakusen why the trade appears to be flourishing in Egypt, bolstered by an EU-funded clampdown on refugees by security forces.

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69. Donald Trump v Beto O'Rourke: rival rallies on US border security – video reportВт., 12 февр.[−]

Donald Trump and potential presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke held rallies in El Paso, Texas, on Monday night offering their contrasting views on Trump's US-Mexico border wall. The president addressed his crowd in front of a big US flag along with three 'finish the wall' banners. Meanwhile nearby, O'Rourke told supporters El Paso was, 'safe not because of walls but in spite of walls'.

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70. Graffiti and 'barbecued dogs': ?have?? vegan ?protests? gone too far??? – videoСр., 06 февр.[−]

As a group of animal rights protesters roast a very realistic-looking fake dog on the streets of Sydney, butchers in France are attacked and campaigners in the UK hold noisy protests in supermarkets and restaurants, we look at whether vegan protests have become too extreme

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71. Flat Earth rising: meet the people casting aside 2,500 years of science – videoВт., 05 февр.[−]

Though not a new phenomenon, flat Earth theory has enjoyed a huge resurgence recently. A YouGov poll indicated that a third of Americans aged 18 to 24 were unsure of the shape of our planet, in spite of scientific proofs from Pythagoras to Nasa. Why has this happened now, and what does it tell us about society today?


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72. Why is Venezuela in crisis? – video explainerПт., 01 февр.[−]

Venezuelans have been in a state of uncertainty since Juan Guaid?, the leader of the democratically elected national assembly, declared himself the interim president in a move against the current leader, Nicol?s Maduro. How did this once prosperous country descend into chaos?

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73. Orb?n, my dad and me – videoПн., 28 янв.[−]

A Guardian film-maker and his father, who left communist Hungary for Britain in the 70s and now supports the nationalist prime minister, Viktor Orb?n, take a road trip through the country in the hope of understanding each other and overcoming their differences

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74. Guardian film Black Sheep nominated for best short documentary OscarВт., 22 янв.[−]

Ed Perkins’ film about a young black boy’s response to a racist gang after he moves out of London is up for an Academy award

Black Sheep, a film commissioned by the Guardian, has been nominated for best short documentary at the 2019 Oscars.

Directed by Ed Perkins, Black Sheep tells the story of Cornelius Walker, a black 11-year-old from London who moves with his family to a housing estate in Essex after the murder of schoolboy Damilola Taylor in 2000. Walker, the same age as Taylor and of similar background, found himself confronting a gang of local racists and, after first fighting back, went to extraordinary lengths to fit in and gain their friendship.

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75. Berta C?ceres case: a warning for those who would kill activistsПт., 30 нояб. 2018[−]

Trial is notable for highlighting land and nature defender murders that ordinarily go unpunished

The sentencing on Thursday of seven men accused of murdering the Honduran environmentalist Berta C?ceres is only partial justice, but it should inspire anyone committed to ending the slaughter of land and nature defenders around the globe.

A court in Tegucigalpa handed down guilty verdicts on all but one of the eight accused, including two employees of the hydro-electric dam company that the indigenous Lenca woman had been campaigning against before her assassination on 2 March 2016.

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76. Berta C?ceres murder trial plagued by allegations of cover-ups set to endЧт., 29 нояб. 2018[−]

Verdict against eight men accused in the murder of Honduran indigenous environmentalist will be handed down on Thursday

The verdict against eight men accused over the murder of Honduran indigenous environmentalist Berta C?ceres will be handed down on Thursday after a controversial five-week trial plagued by allegations of negligence and cover-ups.

C?ceres – who won the 2015 Goldman Environmental Prize – was shot dead in March 2016, after a long battle against the internationally financed Agua Zarca hydroelectric dam project on the Gualcarque river, territory sacred to the indigenous Lenca people.

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77. Civil rights 'under serious attack' across the globeВт., 27 нояб. 2018[−]

More than half of countries use censorship, harassment or violence to repress public debate, warns a report

Nearly six in 10 countries are seriously restricting people’s freedoms, according to a new report that warns of a growing repression around the world.

According to the study, there is little or no space for activism in countries such as Eritrea and Syria, and also worrying signs in countries where democracy is considered well established, such as France, the US, Hungary and India.

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78. South African community wins court battle over mining rightsЧт., 22 нояб. 2018[−]

High court orders government to get prior community consent before granting mining rights in Pondoland

Environmental activists in South Africa have won a landmark legal victory after the high court ordered the government to get prior community consent before granting mining rights.

The judgment represents a major victory for campaigners in Xolobeni, a community in Pondoland, who have been involved in a protracted and sometimes violent struggle against a proposed titanium mine.

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