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1. Ukraine and migration on agenda as UK hosts Europe summit amid worries over Trump presidency – politics live16:22[-/+]
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Viktor Orban and Volodymyr Zelenskiy among arrivals as Keir Starmer hosts meeting of European Political Community

Some more of the arrivals pictured at Blenheim Palace for a summit for the European Political Community (EPC) today, courtesy of the newswires:

Here are some of the discussions that have taken place at previous EPC summits, according to the gov.uk website:

At the last meeting in Granada, the UK led discussions on AI and illegal migration. In Moldova, the focus was on supporting the host country in the face of Russian hybrid threats, as well building energy resilience. While at the first EPC meeting in Prague, talks centred around Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and the need for Europe to stand united against his aggression.

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2. The Covid inquiry report makes it clear: Britain was completely and fatally unprepared | Devi Sridhar16:12[-/+]
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The UK must never succumb to such shocking complacency again. Planning for the next pandemic must start now

In 2002, Sars, a dangerous coronavirus, spread across the world with a fatality rate of around 10%. Although it was contained relatively quickly, east Asian countries learned from this experience and updated their pandemic preparedness plans. Their governments wanted to be ready if the virus returned. On the other side of the world, the UK didn’t react or adapt. Complacency was at play, especially with the assumption that Britain was one of the most prepared countries in the world for a pandemic.

The consequence, as Lady Hallett’s first report from the Covid inquiry notes, is that the UK government failed in its basic responsibility to its citizens of keeping them safe. The UK had too many preventable deaths, not only from Covid, but also from the shutdown of health services and a long lockdown that would have been unnecessary had public health systems been in place.

Prof Devi Sridhar is chair of global public health at the University of Edinburgh

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3. UK jobs market cools again as wage growth slows15:55[-/+]
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Interest rate cut hangs in balance after ONS figures show annual pay growth eased to 5.7% in three months to May

UK wage growth slowed in May to the lowest level in two years amid a cooling jobs market, underscoring the challenge for the Bank of England as policymakers decide whether to cut interest rates.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show annual pay growth eased from 5.9% in the three months to April to 5.7% in the three months to May, matching City economists’ predictions.

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4. Hancock and Hunt failed to prepare UK for pandemic, Covid inquiry finds15:40[-/+]
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Health secretaries failed to fix flaws in contingency planning before Covid killed more than 230,000 in UK, report says

The former health secretaries Jeremy Hunt and Matt Hancock have been criticised for their failure to better prepare the UK for the pandemic in a damning first report from the Covid inquiry that calls for a major overhaul in how the government prepares for civil emergencies.

Hunt, who was the health secretary from 2012-18, and Hancock, who took over until 2021, were named by the chair to the inquiry, Heather Hallett, for failing to rectify flaws in contingency planning ahead of the pandemic, which claimed more than 230,000 lives in the UK.

The leader or deputy leader of each of the four nations should chair a cabinet-level committee responsible for civil emergency preparedness.

A UK-wide pandemic response exercise should be run at least every three years and a new UK-wide, whole-system civil emergency strategy be put in place.

External “red teams” should regularly challenge the principles, evidence and advice on emergency plans.

An independent statutory body should be established to advise the UK government and devolved administrations, and consult with voluntary groups and council-based directors of public health on civil emergency preparedness and response.

The UK being prepared for the wrong pandemic: influenza. When Hancock became health secretary in July 2018 his day one briefing said: “Pandemic flu is the government’s highest risk”.

The institutions responsible for emergency planning being “labyrinthine in their complexity”.

The government’s sole pandemic strategy (for flu) being outdated – it was from 2011 – and lacking adaptability.

A failure to appreciate the impact of the pandemic and the response to it on ethnic minority communities, and people in poor health and with other vulnerabilities.

A failure to learn from earlier civil emergency exercises and disease outbreaks.

A “damaging absence of focus” on systems such as test, trace and isolate that could be scaled up.

A lack of adequate leadership in the preceding years, with ministers, untrained in civil contingencies, not being presented with a broad range of scientific opinion. They also failed to sufficiently challenge the advice they got, which in any event was beset by “groupthink”.

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5. Starmer promises to repair ties with European countries15:40[-/+]
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PM hopes to secure new deals on asylum seekers and the trade of defence products at EPC summit

Keir Starmer has promised European leaders he will reset Britain’s ties with their countries as the prime minister uses his first international summit on domestic soil to draw a line under years of fractious relations with continental Europe.

The prime minister used his opening speech at the European Political Community summit at Blenheim Palace on Thursday to reassure the leaders of more than 40 other countries that he wanted to renew “trust and friendship” with them.

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6. About 5,500 prisoners to be released early in England and Wales15:12[-/+]
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Justice secretary says temporary scheme in September and October will ‘avert disaster’ in overcrowding crisis

About 5,500 offenders will be released early from prison as part of a temporary scheme to “avert disaster”, the justice secretary has said.

It is the first time the government has provided a figure for the number of prisoners who will be released in England and Wales as part of emergency measures to prevent the prison system from reaching the point of collapse.

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7. Securing future of Grangemouth oil refinery ‘will test Scottish and UK relations’14:52[-/+]
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Just Transition Commission says finding solution will be litmus test of governments’ ability to work together

Securing the future of Grangemouth oil refinery will be a litmus test of how the Scottish and UK governments reset their relationship after Labour’s election win, and their first challenge in achieving climate goals fairly, according to the expert body tasked with assessing the economic impact of energy transition on local communities.

The Just Transition Commission, set up by the Scottish government, has published its report a week after Keir Starmer described Grangemouth as a “real priority” on his first visit to Scotland since he was elected as prime minister.

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8. UK banks told to treat politicians more fairly after Farage debanking row14:50[-/+]
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The FCA says financial firms should not disadvantage people running for office and their families

The UK’s biggest banks have been told by the City watchdog to do more to ensure parliamentarians, senior public servants and their families are treated fairly in the wake of the Nigel Farage debanking row.

In a warning to financial firms – including banks, payment firms and lenders – the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) said they should not disadvantage people running for office or taking senior public roles.

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9. Hubris and planning for wrong type of pandemic: five key takeaways from Covid inquiry verdict14:21[-/+]
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The pandemic caused ‘grief, untold misery and economic turmoil’ which could have been cut if the UK had been better prepared, report states

Was the UK prepared for Covid? The statutory public inquiry into the pandemic has given its verdict, revealing the impact of austerity and Brexit on the UK’s response and giving bereaved families a measure of vindication and validation. Here are the main points covered in the first of several reports from the inquiry.

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10. EU biometric checks for foreign travellers delayed again13:42[-/+]
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Digital border system that will require fingerprint and facial scans postponed until November

The date for the introduction of the EU’s new entry-exit system has been pushed back again until November, allaying fears of long queues at the border during the October half-term holidays.

The launch of the new biometric checks for foreign travellers, including Britons, entering the EU, has been delayed from 6 October until at least 10 November, with many smaller airports yet to have facilities in place.

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11. The radical who left Oxfam to fight for democracy: ‘Eight men own half the world. Where does this end?’12:00[-/+]
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Danny Sriskandarajah hoped this would be the century of the citizen. Instead the autocrats and the billionaires are on the march. Can his new book make a difference?

As a young man, fighting what he saw as the broken institutions of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, Danny Sriskandarajah had a T-shirt bearing the slogan “International Mother Fuckers”. These days, from a distance, he can come off as an establishment figure, but don’t be fooled by his equanimous nature and cheerful sartorial style. He is a political radical, forged in the fire of childhood exile from Sri Lanka and his family’s fight from their new home in Australia for the persecuted Tamils left behind.

Sriskandarajah, 48, is the head of the New Economics Foundation (NEF), a thinktank founded 40 years ago to fight neoliberalism. Before starting that role in January, he was the chief executive of Oxfam, which he took over in 2019, after the heinous scandal about staff paying for sex with earthquake survivors in Haiti, some of whom may have been children. Sriskandarajah didn’t go for that job because he was a safe pair of hands who could make trouble go away, but rather because he saw that “the sexual misconduct, the safeguarding failures and the abuse of power were symptomatic of a wider challenge in the development sector … it has ended up feeling neocolonial”.

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12. Lammy says Christianity and class give him common ground with JD Vance11:44[-/+]
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UK foreign secretary says he has talked to Trump running mate as he seeks to build bridges with senior Republicans

UK politics live – latest updates

David Lammy has said he is already engaging with Donald Trump’s controversial running mate, JD Vance, and can identify with him because of their common working class and Christian backgrounds.

The British foreign secretary was speaking just hours after the possible future US vice-president reiterated his “America first” views, pledging to the Republican national convention (RNC) that he would not send US soldiers to war abroad unnecessarily.

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13. Labour must ramp up renewable energy to meet 2030 climate vows, says watchdog08:00[-/+]
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CCC says delays and reverses under Rishi Sunak have left UK drastically off track from Paris commitments

The new Labour government must oversee a massive ramping up of renewable energy generation in this parliament or the UK will breach its international obligations under the Paris agreement, the government’s climate watchdog has said.

The Conservative government left the country drastically off track to meet its international commitments, despite setting the carbon-cutting target before hosting the Cop26 climate summit in Glasgow in 2021, the Committee on Climate Change found in its most recent annual report.

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14. ‘It’s put so many families in poverty’: people on the impact of the two-child benefit capСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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As Labour backbenchers call for Keir Starmer to scrap the cap, families reveal their struggles as a result of the two-child limit

Keir Starmer has launched a cross-government taskforce to tackle child poverty, but backbench Labour MPs are calling for the government to go further and scrap the two-child benefit cap. Here people reveal how the limit affects their families.

Alicia* is a mother of four children in Newcastle, and is separated from their father. She does everything she can to avoid going to collect a parcel from a food bank. She will often buy a big sack of potatoes and cook them in different ways throughout the week – jacket potatoes, fried chips, wedges – so her kids get variation. She often skips breakfast and lunch herself.

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15. Nige shows up for pomp of king’s speech, then jets off to US when the work starts | John CraceСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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Clacton MP clearly had far more important things to do, like trying to boost his profile at the Republican convention

On days like these it pays to have a sense of humour. Or at the very least a fondness for the theatre of the absurd. It might be all change over in the House of Commons but there are traditions still to be observed in the Lords for the state opening of parliament.

This is the day the upper chamber comes over all Disney. The day when nobody laughs when the cap of maintenance gets its own horse carriage from Buckingham Palace to Westminster. Definitely nothing weird about that. The day when the Bluemantle Pursuivant, the Maltravers Herald Extraordinary and the Clarenceux King of Arms – whoever they are in real life – all get to make guest appearances. And everyone stands for their arrival.

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16. The Guardian view on the king’s speech: a new era of state intervention begins | EditorialСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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Sir Keir Starmer’s cautious-sounding manifesto has generated a governing programme of radical departure from recent economic orthodoxy

The state opening of parliament colourfully illustrates the distinction between politics as performance and politics as delivery. The monarch advertises the government’s agenda as if passing a law is sufficient to bring about change. In reality, legislation is just a first enabling step before the real work bringing tangible improvement to people’s lives can begin. That is something the Conservatives forgot in government. They too often used bills in the Commons as tools of campaign communication, sending ideological signals instead of focusing on competent administration.

Sir Keir Starmer promises the opposite approach. The content of Wednesday’s king’s speech mostly reflects a new seriousness about practical administration. The focus is on the role that the government can play in fostering conditions for greater prosperity.

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17. Starmer counts on promises he can fulfil to rebuild voters’ trustСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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First king’s speech emphasises predictability and reliability with a programme of familiar, sometimes radical fixes and reforms

Keir Starmer knows that restoring the faith of voters in the British political system will be key to the success, or otherwise, of his Labour government. “The fight for trust is the battle that defines our political era,” he said in his introduction to his first king’s speech.

He knows from experience that trust is only won through competent delivery. During the election campaign Starmer recounted a story from Frank Dobson, the previous Holborn and St Pancras MP, about another predecessor.

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18. With this king’s speech, Starmer has staked everything on the long game. But politics has a habit of moving fast | Martin KettleСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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The NHS, child poverty, defence: Labour is selling itself on its ability to get some big things done

Britain’s new government has just reached the point where things get serious. The king’s speech marks the ceremonial divide between Labour’s pinch-yourself fortnight following the 4 July election landslide and the start of the hard slog of delivery, by which Keir Starmer’s government will actually be judged next time. It’s the end of the overture and the start of the drama itself, the part that really matters.

Before the election there was a debate among those around Starmer about how to approach the opening days in government. Some wanted the new government to immediately trigger a blizzard of activity to show that Labour was active and a contrast to the Conservatives. In this view, promoted in particular by Starmer’s chief of staff, Sue Gray, the first 100 days were crucial, an agenda-driven opportunity to reignite confidence in government.

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19. Ella Baron on Labour’s failure to address the two-child benefit cap in the king’s speech – cartoonСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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20. The king’s speech sounded a bit like Labour governments of old. But only a bitСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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There is to be action but not a tax-and-spend splurge – just patient changes that will take time to pay off

The message from the king’s speech was clear. After 14 years in opposition, Labour is back with a plan to get the economy moving. The brakes on growth are coming off, says the prime minister.

In a way, the measures outlined to achieve the government’s “mission” hark back to Labour governments of the past. There is to be more nationalisation, more centralised control of planning, more power for workers, an industrial strategy council and a national wealth fund to boost investment in infrastructure projects. Economic policy under Keir Starmer will become more interventionist and have a discernible social-democratic tinge to it.

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21. After Vaughan Gething’s ignominious end, Labour faces the unthinkable: losing the next election in Wales | Richard Wyn JonesСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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A jaded electorate, a muted general election result and divisions in the Senedd could soon spell trouble

Vaughan Gething’s brief, four-month-long tenure as Wales’s first minister came to an ignominious end on Tuesday morning after four members of the Welsh government resigned their posts, making it clear that they were no longer willing to serve under him. That the four had little option but to adopt what we must now call the Boris Johnson gambit was confirmed by his subsequent resignation statement in which Gething was characteristically defiant and unapologetic.

Given that no rules had been broken – as with Johnson, also Gething’s mantra – there could be no reasonable objection to his decision to fund his successful leadership campaign through a large donation from a company owned by a businessman who had previously been convicted of environmental crimes. Any suggestion to the contrary was politically motivated and thoroughly mendacious. Absent was even a hint of remorse about his own behaviour, let alone any pretence that he was leaving of his own volition. It was a statement that served only to confirm that it was Gething’s obduracy and, yes, hubris that was the ultimate cause of his downfall.

Richard Wyn Jones is director of the Wales Governance Centre and dean of public affairs at Cardiff University

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22. The Brexit fantasists may be beaten, but Brexit reality is a far tougher foe | Rafael BehrСр, 17 июл[-/+]
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Only when the blinkers of Eurosceptic ideology are removed does the full scale of the task of repairing EU relations become clear

Rishi Sunak didn’t choose an early July election so that defeat might spare him the hassle of hosting tomorrow’s summit of the European Political Community (EPC), but it is a duty he was glad to forgo.

Protocols of continental fellowship never came naturally to the Conservative leader and his party would have despised him for faking them. By contrast, Keir Starmer is grateful for the gathering in Blenheim as a chance to show how Britain under a Labour government is released from Brexit neurosis.

Rafael Behr is a Guardian columnist

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23. What can the Tories tell Welsh Labour about Gething – try harder not to be like us?Вт, 16 июл[-/+]
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Vaughan Gething’s downfall is a bad look for Labour – but compared with Boris Johnson he seemed a model of decency

Look on the bright side. With 118 days as the Welsh first minister behind him, Vaughan Gething has comfortably done two Liz Trusses and more. The Tories have sent the benchmark for failure commendably low. There again, a shade under four months is still – how shall we put it kindly? – sub-optimal. Especially when your time in office includes having lost a no-confidence vote a while ago that you chose to ignore. This isn’t the kind of record that inspires confidence. Not least when it’s your own party who are out to get you.

On Tuesday morning, the Welsh Labour government hit crisis point when three ministers resigned and a senior adviser resigned over Gething’s continued leadership. The writing wasn’t so much on the wall as right in his face. Within an hour Gething succumbed to the inevitable and announced his resignation. At lunchtime he made a personal statement to the Senedd before first minister’s questions.

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24. The Guardian view on the widening attainment gap: poorer children need a boost | EditorialВт, 16 июл[-/+]
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The progress made by pupils from lower-income families has been wiped out – and it’s not all the pandemic’s fault

The widening gap between the educational attainment of the richest and poorest pupils at English schools is a blow for everyone who wants to see the latter fulfil their potential, and for our society to become less divided and more equal. It is revealed in the latest report from the Education Policy Institute (EPI), which focuses on 2019-23, so its findings are a snapshot of the pandemic and its aftermath. While the declining achievements of children from poorer backgrounds are not a surprise, it is dismaying to see predictions about the damaging and uneven impact of Covid disruption come true.

Shrinking this gap is a longstanding objective, and one that the pupil premium – extra funding for schools with poorer intakes – was designed to further. But with the gap for 11- and 16-year-olds now bigger than at any time since 2011, a decade of progress has been wiped out. For children with special educational needs, the deterioration is even starker (though older pupils in this category are doing better). The report also adds to a concerning body of evidence about the youngest children, with poorer five-year-olds falling further behind. A recent survey of teachers found that growing numbers of reception-year pupils are not toilet-trained and struggle to play with others.

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25. The Guardian view on Vaughan Gething: the election victory hid a weakness in Wales | EditorialВт, 16 июл[-/+]
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Labour will need to refresh itself with a new leadership that is capable of creative dealmaking

The departure of Vaughan Gething as Welsh first minister was a short time coming. Mr Gething was forced to resign after just four months because of his high-handed behaviour towards political opponents and Labour colleagues, as well as his contempt for the norms of democracy. Mr Gething’s legacy is a divided Labour party in Wales, one riven by personal and ideological differences. These had been building for years. But the first minister’s actions only made the disagreements more disagreeable.

Although Welsh Labour won its 28th general election in a row this month, the results effectively sealed Mr Gething’s fate. On the surface, the Tories were routed in Wales, losing all 14 MPs. Yet this disguises the fragmentation of politics in the country. On the right of politics, the Conservatives haemorrhaged votes to Reform. While Labour’s vote share increased by 1.6% across the UK, in Wales it fell by 3.9% – with the nationalist Plaid Cymru and the Greens eating into the leftwing vote and increasing their shares by 4.9% and 3.7% respectively.

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26. Martin Rowson on the transformation of Donald Trump – cartoonВт, 16 июл[-/+]
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27. Quick, tangible change will see off the hard right – these are the things Labour must do now | John McDonnellВт, 16 июл[-/+]
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Nigel Farage is poised to pounce, but a wave of progressive policy delivery is well within the new government’s reach

The relief of getting rid of the Tories can mask the fact that we have entered potentially the most divisive political period for the politics of this country since 20 April 1968. That was the date when the rightwing Conservative minister Enoch Powell made his infamous “rivers of blood” speech railing against immigration.

At the time, hard-right parties had failed to secure parliamentary representation. But Powell’s intervention had the effect of giving permission for racist ideas to permeate the mainstream, including the Conservative party, for the next two decades. Replace Powell’s references to immigrants with Nigel Farage’s attacks on asylum seekers and we’re back to equally divisive demagoguery.

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28. Citizens’ assemblies could work wonders for Labour and Britain – but only if they’re more than a talking shop | Richard WilsonВт, 16 июл[-/+]
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In France and Ireland, assemblies are laboratories of democracy. They can be here too, if politicians commit to adopting their ideas

Keir Starmer has made it clear he will govern for everyone, “country first, party second”. This is the kind of thing all new prime ministers say on the steps of Downing Street, but I sense that with Starmer it’s different. At some point in Labour’s first 100 days, I think the leadership will announce a major citizens’ assembly for the UK. His staff have been visiting the team behind the Irish citizens’ assembly, which created new political mandates on issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage. If Labour gets this right, it could be the key to galvanising the nation around its manifesto commitments.

Citizens’ assemblies are groups of people selected by lottery, much like jury service. They are demographically representative of the place in question, and they can help build consensus around divisive issues, and inform the public of policy nuances in areas where there is likely to be resistance and misinformation. They can also build solidarity between people, and give citizens a stake in political change. This is particularly relevant in areas such as health and net zero, on which communities can become divided at implementation. Just look at the conversation around vaccines, for instance, or the anti-Ulez protests.

Richard Wilson is the CEO of Iswe Foundation

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29. We are public sector workers – this is how more cuts would wreck our NHS, courts, councils and universities | The panelВт, 16 июл[-/+]
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After years of austerity, the government’s plans imply another reduction in funding that public services simply cannot take

The Resolution Foundation has estimated that Labour’s spending plans commit the party to around GBP18bn of annual budget cuts over the next parliament. As they stand, these would affect “unprotected” areas of government such as the Department for Work and Pensions, the Ministry of Justice, local councils and higher education – and a funding shortfall for a depleted NHS. Ahead of this week’s king’s speech, when the new government will lay out its legislative agenda, five public sector workers give their verdict on Labour’s approach.

Emma Vincent Miller is a solicitor at Osbornes Law

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30. Guy Shrubsole on Donald Trump’s enhanced stature – cartoonПн, 15 июл[-/+]
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