Technology | The Guardian18:34 Текст источника в новой вкладке
Latest Technology news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2018

 
 
1. How firms you have never interacted with can target your Facebook09:00[−]

Advertisers are seemingly able to access accounts with no input from the user

On one of Facebook’s myriad setting screens, a place where few dare tread, is a list of places you’ve probably never heard of, all of whom insist that they know you. It’s emblematic of the data protection issues Facebook is struggling to address in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, of the fact that these problems spread far beyond Facebook, and of the easy solutions the company could take if only it had the courage.

This list is the collection of “advertisers you’ve interacted with”. You can find it halfway down your ad preferences screen, below a list of algorithmically suggested topics that Facebook thinks you’re interested in (if you’re a heavy user, these may be scarily accurate; if you’re not, they’ll likely be hilariously off).

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2. Two years' detention for UK teenager who 'cyberterrorised' US officialsПт., 20 апр.[−]

Kane Gamble, 18, targeted CIA and FBI chiefs from Leicestershire housing estate

A teenager who rocked the US intelligence community when he tricked his way into top officials’ accounts in a campaign of “cyberterrorism” has been locked up for two years.

Kane Gamble, 18, founder of Crackas With Attitude (CWA), admitted targeting high-profile figures such as the then CIA chief, John Brennan, and his wife, and the FBI deputy director, Mark Giuliano, from his family home on a Leicestershire housing estate.

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3. Inside Nintendo's Labo toy factory: 'Creating and learning are fun!'Пт., 20 апр.[−]

Developers at the gaming giant reveal the thinking behind their new range of hi-tech interactive cardboard construction kits, and the laughs they had while inventing them

The launch of a new Nintendo product always generates excitement, because you never quite know what you are going to get. In 2004, Nintendo abandoned the wildly successful Game Boy portable consoles in favour of an ugly silver clamshell with two screens, the DS. Two years later, when other games companies were focused on improving their consoles’ graphical power, Nintendo popularised motion control with the comparatively underpowered Wii. Both announcements attracted scepticism and even mockery from players and market analysts alike, and both sold more than 100m each.

The company’s experimental approach is not always successful, however. Though Nintendo’s most recent console, the Switch, has been a huge success so far, its predecessor, the Wii U, was one of the worst-selling games machines of all time. Nintendo Labo, out today in the US and on 27 April in the UK, is one of Nintendo’s weirdest ever ideas: a set of cardboard construction kits that, combined with the game software packaged with it, can be used to create interactive toys.

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4. Google vs the right to be forgotten: Chips with Everything podcastПт., 20 апр.[−]

In April 2018, Google lost a landmark case against a businessman who used his ‘right to be forgotten’ to have links to a previous conviction taken down from the search engine. Jordan Erica Webber discusses the importance of this case and looks ahead at the coming era of General Data Protection Regulation

Subscribe and review: Acast, Apple, Spotify, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud. Join the discussion on Facebook, Twitter or email us at podcasts@theguardian.com

We’ve all done things we regret. Perhaps you’re one of those people who lies awake at night fretting about something hurtful you said 10 years ago. Or maybe you committed a crime in your youth, served your time, reformed and are dedicated to a new life as a law-abiding citizen.

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5. Chat: Google’s big shot at killing Apple’s iMessageПт., 20 апр.[−]

Tech giant behind Android corrals phone operators around the world to launch a unified SMS replacement

Google has unveiled a new messaging system, Chat, an attempt to replace SMS, unify Android’s various messaging services and beat Apple’s iMessage and Facebook’s WhatsApp with the help of mobile phone operators.

Unlike traditional texting, or SMS, most modern messaging services – such as Signal, WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger or Apple’s iMessage – are so-called over-the-top (OTT) services, which circumvent the mobile phone operator by sending messages over the internet.

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6. Americans want tougher rules for big tech amid privacy scandals, poll findsПт., 20 апр.[−]

After Cambridge Analytica revelations, 83% of Americans call for companies like Facebook to face harsher penalties for breaches

Americans want major technology companies to be regulated, with legal responsibility for the content they carry on their platforms and harsher punishment for breaches of data privacy, according to a nationally representative survey of 2,500 adults.

In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the way that technology companies handle our personal data and moderate the content – including fake news, hate speech and terrorist propaganda – on their platforms has been thrown under the microscope.

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7. Artificial intelligence, robots and a human touch | LettersЧт., 19 апр.[−]
Deborah O’Neill on the failings of automation at Tesla and elsewhere, and Matt Meyer and Nick Lynch on the House of Lords AI select committee report

Elon Musk’s comment that humans are underrated ( Humans replace robots at flagging Tesla plant, 17 April) doesn’t come as much of a surprise, even though his company is at the forefront of the technological revolution. Across industries, CEOs are wrestling with the balance between humans and increasingly cost-effective and advanced robots and artificial intelligence. However, as Mr Musk has discovered, the complexity of getting a machine to cover every possibility results in a large web of interconnected elements that can overcomplicate the underlying problem. This is why so many organisations fail when they try to automate everything they do. Three key mistakes I see time and again in these situations are missing the data basics, applying the wrong strategy, and losing the human touch.

There are some clear cases where automation works well: low value, high repetition tasks or even complex ones where additional data will give a better outcome, for example, using medical-grade scanners on mechanical components to identify faults not visible to the human eye. But humans are better at reacting to unlikely, extreme, or unpredictable edge cases, for example being aware that a music festival has relocated and extra cider needs to go to stores near the new venue rather than the previous location.

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8. Zelda? Pok?mon? Spyro? Players tweet their defining gamesЧт., 19 апр.[−]

Under the trending Twitter hashtag #GameStruck4, video game fans have spent the day listing the four titles that defined their love of gaming. Some are predictable, others not so much

It’s a question video game fans often discuss: which games have defined your life? Now that question has become a trending Twitter hashtag, and some familiar classics are emerging as the most widely inspiring experiences.

It all started yesterday when streaming service Filmstruck took to Twitter asking people to list their four life-changing movies under a hashtag, #FilmStruck4. In response, Twitch streamer Marcus “EpicNameBro” Sanders tweeted: “I don’t watch movies, so I can’t do the whole ‘What 4 films define you’ thing. But I can do games.” He listed four titles – Final Fantasy Tactics, Demon’s Souls, Cave Story and World of Warcraft – and added the hashtag #GameStruck4.

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9. Amazon buys exclusive UK rights to US Open tennis tournamentЧт., 19 апр.[−]

Five-year deal, thought worth $40m, gives Prime subscribers in UK access to grand slam event

Amazon has struck a deal said to be worth $40m (?30m) for the exclusive UK TV rights to the US Open tennis tournament, as the US firm looks to add to its 100 million Prime subscribers.

Amazon, which is in talks with the Premier League to potentially stream matches from 2019 to 2022, has struck a five-year deal starting with this summer’s tournament at Flushing Meadows in New York.

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10. What’s the best email service that doesn’t scan emails for ad-targeting?Чт., 19 апр.[−]

Jim doesn’t want his emails scanned for targeted ads, but while there are ways to avoid it, surveillance-based advertising is rife

What’s the best free email service provider that does not scan or use the data in your emails for advertising? Jim

Free email services are usually paid for by showing you advertisements. Some email services scan your emails in order to show you personalised or targeted ads. You could argue that that’s a benefit, because you’ll see ads in which you might have some interest. You could also argue that your emails are private, so it’s an invasion of privacy. Either way, it’s different from scanning your emails to stop viruses and phishing attempts, which nobody wants to stop.

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11. Will Democrats be bold and pledge to break up tech monopolies? | Ross BarkanЧт., 19 апр.[−]

Amazon, Google, Facebook and Apple have accrued so much power, it has damaged American democracy

For those Democrats who dream of being president, it’s no longer safe to play it safe. We live in a dangerous, unstable time in a democracy that is far from healthy. Many of the forces corroding it precede Donald Trump, despite progressives who would tell you otherwise – this entire century, so far, has been a misery for many Americans.

Related: The web can be weaponised – and we can't count on big tech to stop it | Tim Berners-Lee

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12. Tesla factory to be investigated over safety concernsЧт., 19 апр.[−]

California base faces claims of unreported injuries as it struggles to roll out Model 3

Tesla is facing an investigation by Californian safety regulators into reports of serious injuries at its factory in Fremont, California, where it is struggling to scale up production of its Model 3 mass-market electric car.

The California Occupational Safety and Health Administration said on Wednesday it had begun an inspection on Tuesday, a day after the news website Reveal alleged that Tesla failed to disclose legally mandated reports on serious worker injuries, making its safety record appear better than it was.

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13. Rampaging wage slaves and Marie Antoinette – the pick of avant-garde festival gamesЧт., 19 апр.[−]

An edible board game and a trickster goose were among offerings at London’s Now Play This experimental games showcase

Now Play This is an exhibition of experimental game design and a regular feature of the annual London games festival. For this year’s Now Play This, at Somerset House earlier this month, exhibition director Holly Gramazio and digital curator George Buckenham spread a wide range of games – digital, physical, edible, musical – across the site’s indoor and outdoor spaces. Here are some of our favourites.

Lost Wage Rampage (Jane Friedhoff, Marlowe Dobbe, and Andy Wallace)

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14. How Europe's 'breakthrough' privacy law takes on Facebook and GoogleЧт., 19 апр.[−]

Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation is forcing big changes at tech’s biggest firms – even if the US isn’t likely to follow suit

Despite the political theatre of Mark Zuckerberg’s congressional interrogations last week, Facebook’s business model isn’t at any real risk from regulators in the US. In Europe, however, the looming General Data Protection Regulation will give people better privacy protections and force companies including Facebook to make sweeping changes to the way they collect data and consent from users – with huge fines for those who don’t comply.

“It’s changing the balance of power from the giant digital marketing companies to focus on the needs of individuals and democratic society,” said Jeffrey Chester, founder of the Center for Digital Democracy. “That’s an incredible breakthrough.”

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15. Can these robots build an Ikea chair? – videoСр., 18 апр.[−]

Scientists have demonstrated two robots using human-like dexterity to construct an Ikea chair. Components of the chair were randomly scattered in front of the robots, who were able to identify the correct parts and detect force to understand when, for example, pins were fully inserted into their holes, all while managing to move without obstructing one another

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16. Facebook is a tyranny – and our government isn't built to stop itСр., 18 апр.[−]

America’s founders didn’t envision the power of the corporation. We need a new structure for self-governance that can counter 21st-century monopolies

Last week, Senator Dick Durbin asked: “Mr Zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing with us the name of the hotel you stayed in last night?”

The Facebook CEO froze and then answered: “No.”

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17. San Francisco's scooter war: city hits back as 'unlawful' schemes flood streetsСр., 18 апр.[−]

City officials send cease-and-desist letters to electric scooter startups, as local residents complain the unregulated schemes are a nuisance

Some people are tossing the scooters into trash cans and lakes. Others are tripping over them on the sidewalk, complaining of broken toes and dangerous collisions.

The San Francisco war over electric scooters – which several startups have dumped on to sidewalks in a competitive rush to launch unregulated rental programs – dramatically escalated on Monday when the city attorney sent cease-and-desist letters, warning that authorities would “impound” the motorized devices to stop the “dangerous” and “unlawful operation”.

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18. Has a Russian intelligence agent hacked your wifi?Вт., 17 апр.[−]

A global conflict is taking place on the internet – and your router may be more attractive to a foreign operative than you think

Another day, another hacking attack – or, in Monday’s case, another few million hacking attacks. Russia has been blamed by the US and the UK for a global hacking campaign that involves breaking into millions of computers and other devices, including wifi routers.

Tens or hundreds of thousands of the devices they have targeted are reportedly in the UK – so why is Vladimir Putin apparently so keen to break into your internet connection?

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19. You can buy anything on the black market – including Twitter handlesВт., 17 апр.[−]

The perfect @ identity is a must-have accessory for big companies and brand-conscious celebrities – at any cost

Everything has a price, even the top Twitter handles, and if somebody does not want to sell then they may be forced to relinquish their account.

“We have a marketplace which allows the sale of Twitter handles,” says Philly, a subversive marketer who founded ForumKorner, an online gaming forum. “Unlike some websites, however, we do not allow the sales of stolen accounts that some people phish, or hack, to obtain before reselling them.”

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20. How to get rich quick in Silicon Valley | Corey PeinВт., 17 апр.[−]
Corey Pein took his half-baked startup idea to America’s hottest billionaire factory – and found a wasteland of techie hustlers and con men

The most desirable career of the 21st century, with numerous advantages over other fast-growing occupations such as hospice carer and rickshaw driver, is being a billionaire. Prior to the incorporation of US Steel in 1901, the world didn’t have a single billion-dollar company, much less a billion-dollar individual. Today, more people than ever are becoming billionaires – 2,000 and counting have made the great leap upward, according to the “global wealth team” at Forbes. And the US’s hottest billionaire factory is located in the most hyped yet least understood swath of suburban sprawl in the world: Silicon Valley.

Despite what you may have heard, hard work in your chosen trade is absolutely the stupidest way to join the billionaires club. In Silicon Valley, the world’s most brilliant MBAs and IT professionals discovered a shortcut to fabulous riches. Ambitious Ivy Leaguers who once flocked to Wall Street are now packing up and heading west. The Valley’s startup founders, investors, equity-holding executives and fee-taking middlemen have thrived above all. Inspired by their success, my idea was to move to Silicon Valley, pitch a startup and become obscenely rich. I left home with some homemade business cards showing my new email address, futurebillionaire@aol.com, and a bunch of half-baked ideas.

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21. Australia doesn’t exist! And other bizarre geographic conspiracies that won’t go awayВс., 15 апр.[−]

A theory denying the existence of the country is gaining ground. But the suggestion that countries and cities are mere figments of our imagination is a meme that dates back to the birth of the web

Australia doesn’t exist. The signs were there the whole time: in what country is the only thing more poisonous than the snakes the spiders? How did we ever believe that kangaroos were a thing?

This discovery, believed by some to be a joke or a conspiracy theory, has been circulating on social media in recent weeks after being formulated on Reddit in early 2017. Except it turns out not to be the only theory of its kind: through the years, online sleuths have found that all sorts of places don’t exist.

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22. Facebook says its ‘voter button’ is good for turnout. But should the tech giant be nudging us at all?Вс., 15 апр.[−]

What do we really know about the influence of the ‘voter button’?

On the morning of 28 October last year, the day of Iceland’s parliamentary elections, Hei?d?s Lilja Magn?sd?ttir, a lawyer living in a small town in the north of the country, opened Facebook on her laptop. At the top of her newsfeed, where friends’ recent posts would usually appear, was a box highlighted in light blue. On the left of the box was a button, similar in style to the familiar thumb of the “like” button, but here it was a hand putting a ballot in a slot. “Today is Election Day!” was the accompanying exclamation, in English. And underneath: “Find out where to vote, and share that you voted.” Under that was smaller print saying that 61 people had already voted. Hei?d?s took a screenshot and posted it on her own Facebook profile feed, asking: “I’m a little curious! Did everyone get this message in their newsfeed this morning?”

In Reykjavik, 120 miles south, Elfa ?r Gylfad?ttir glanced at her phone and saw Hei?d?s’s post. Elfa is director of the Icelandic Media Commission, and Hei?d?s’s boss. The Media Commission regulates, for example, age ratings for movies and video games, and is a part of Iceland’s Ministry of Education. Elfa wondered why she hadn’t received the same voting message. She asked her husband to check his feed, and there was the button. Elfa was alarmed. Why wasn’t it being shown to everyone? Might it have something to do with different users’ political attitudes? Was everything right and proper with this election?

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23. Game on for Ian Dallas, a man who tells a good tale | Rebecca NicholsonВс., 15 апр.[−]

The creator of Bafta award winner Edith Finch is pushing the boundaries of storytelling

What Remains of Edith Finch was a surprise best game winner at the Bafta Games awards on Thursday night. The indie release had been nominated in several other categories, but its top prize victory was such a shock that its creative director, Ian Dallas of Giant Sparrow, claimed not to have prepared a speech. “I wrote a speech for all the other awards, but this one I figured there would be something in Japanese,” Dallas told the BBC, a joke referring to Nintendo, which dominated elsewhere with Super Mario Odyssey and the stunning The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a game so all-encompassing it seems to have the special ability of making time disappear.

Edith Finch is a remarkable little game, though to call it little is, perhaps, to do it a disservice. It is short, at two to three hours (and as a result, relatively cheap), but it is vast in its imagination, scope and literary ambition. Dallas has spoken before of the influences behind this eerie and beautiful story of a girl returning home to explore the history of her cursed family, citing HP Lovecraft, Edgar Allen Poe and particularly Gabriel Garc?a M?rquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude as reference points.

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24. GoFundMe figures reveal thousands rely on site to avoid homelessnessПт., 13 апр.[−]

There have been nearly 300,000 GoFundMe campaigns in the US related to homelessness over the last three years. Some see it as a sign of a broken social system and dwindling options for those in need

Dave Schulman’s long decline toward homelessness began 18 years ago, when, as a reserve police officer in southern California, he fell from a wall and seriously injured his neck during a response to a robbery call. In the years that followed, he lost his ability to work, his wife left him and the bank foreclosed on his Costa Mesa house. Depressed and in constant pain, he has recently been on the verge of losing the trailer that he now calls home, because his truck broke and he could no longer move it from place to place.

But Schulman’s luck changed in January, when a former police colleague recognized that he was on the edge of losing everything and organized a GoFundMe fundraising campaign

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25. How Mark Zuckerberg's testimony lurched from easy ride to headacheПт., 13 апр.[−]

Facebook founder was lost for words as representatives asked questions about user tracking

As Mark Zuckerberg left Congress on Tuesday after testifying to the Senate, he may have felt relieved. The four-hour Q&A session had been largely dominated by mundane questions of fact about how Facebook works, requests for apologies and updates he had already given and was happy to repeat, and shameless begs for the social network’s cash pile to be used to expand broadband access in senators’ home states.

Less than 24 hours later, however, a very different pattern of questioning in front of 54 members of the House of Representatives suggested a much more worrying outcome for Facebook – that this could be the week its crisis moves from being about mistakes in the past to inherent problems in the present. Perhaps, the representatives implied, Facebook doesn’t just have a problem. What if it is the problem?

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26. Google cases are a battle between right to privacy and right to knowПт., 13 апр.[−]

Court focusing on two men whose criminal backgrounds are the subject of articles online

At the heart of the first high court ruling on the “right to be forgotten” principle in England and Wales is a battle between the right to privacy and the right to know.

The cases focus on two businessmen, convicted of offences more than a decade ago, whose criminal backgrounds are the subject of articles online.

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27. Hey! Algorithms, leave them kids alone: Chips with Everything podcastПт., 13 апр.[−]

This week, Jordan Erica Webber looks into reports that YouTube Kids might create an algorithm-free platform to prevent children viewing inappropriate content by clicking on seemingly benign video suggestions

Subscribe and review: Acast, Apple, Spotify, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud. Join the discussion on Facebook, Twitter or email us at podcasts@theguardian.com

These days, we hear a lot about algorithms. The word tends to crop up when some or other tech company is forced to apologise for whatever new scandal has thrown them into the spotlight. Whether the issue is big data and profiling, or search results and suggested content, it is the algorithm that gets the blame.

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28. Is this cake server the most extraordinary but useless machine ever? – videoПт., 13 апр.[−]

New Zealand-born Joseph Herscher has created an absurdly complex machine for the simple purpose of serving a piece of cake. The device, which is known as a Rube Goldberg machine after the man who first came up with the concept, includes a hammer, melting butter, a falling laptop and a baby. The project took Herscher three months to complete with 90% of the time spent on trial and error


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29. Did senators questioning Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg understand the internet? – videoЧт., 12 апр.[−]

The Facebook founder, Mark Zuckerberg, faced five hours of questioning on Capitol Hill for the first time on Tuesday. However, questions and comments from some of the senators ranged from less technically informed to the bizarre, raising the question: did they really understand how the internet works?

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30. How can I store my digital photos for ever?Чт., 12 апр.[−]

Arunima wonders if one external hard drive will keep cherished pictures safely available for decades, but it’s not that simple

I read your article from June 2016 on What’s the best way to organise and store my digital photos? Is it not sufficient to save my pictures on one external hard drive? Must I save them on two? Also, for how many years will an external hard drive keep the pictures safe?

I have an Apple iMac and until now all my pictures were stored in Photos. Yesterday, I transferred them to an external hard drive and emptied Photos. Is this not enough to ensure the safety and availability of my pics for ever? Arunima

Nothing lasts for ever, and digital images can disappear in seconds. People lose their most important photos every day when hard drives fail, when smartphones and laptops are stolen, when online services shut down, and when natural disasters strike. Fires, floods and earthquakes can also destroy digital records.

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31. Fact-checking Mark Zuckerberg's testimony about Facebook privacyЧт., 12 апр.[−]

When it came to data collection, the CEO cleverly deflected lawmakers’ scrutiny. Here are the claims that don’t stand up

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg remained calm and composed as he sat through more than 10 hours of questioning by members of Congress on Tuesday and Wednesday. His strategy appeared to be to show remorse and deference, highlight the changes Facebook had already made and pledge to do more to protect user privacy and prevent foreign interference in elections.

Related: Five things we learned from Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook hearing

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32. Five things we learned from Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook hearingСр., 11 апр.[−]

The CEO’s privacy is as vulnerable as ours, and the social network faces a regulation battle

His data was sold to a malicious third party as well, he confirmed, in an answer to a question from the Democratic representative Anna Eshoo.

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33. Can I avoid Windows 10 on a travel laptop for email and word processing?Чт., 05 апр.[−]

Thomas wants to avoid Windows 10’s update problems on small laptops with only 32GB of storage. He’s asking about installing Windows 7 instead, but there are better options

Is it possible to install Windows 7 on an Asus notebook with 32GB of storage? I don’t need the complexities of Windows 10 and its updating problems. I just need a light machine for travelling that gives me access to email and a word processor. Thomas

As a rule of thumb, you should never try to install an old operating system on new hardware, unless it has been tested to run it. Microsoft released Windows 7 in 2009, almost nine years ago. The hardware in Windows machines has changed since then, and you may not be able to find the drivers needed to make your Asus work with Windows 7.

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34. GDPR: how can I email data securely to comply with the new regulations?Чт., 29 марта[−]

Robert is often required to email sensitive data. Is there a secure way of doing so in view of the new data protection laws?

As a freelance media professional, I am often asked by my various employers to send copies of my passport, completed visa forms and other sensitive data in the form of email attachments. I have recently questioned this and have not really got a satisfactory response. I have tried uploading these documents to my Google Drive account and giving them a link, though I don’t really know whether this method is any safer. However, I am at a loss to see how companies should acquire such sensitive data in light of the new GDPR rules coming into force in May. Robert

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into force on May 25, will govern the storage and processing of data rather than its collection. It also includes some very important consumer rights. The most important are the right to be informed, the right of access, the right to correct errors, the right to erase data, the right to restrict processing, and the right take it elsewhere (data portability). How useful these will be in practice remains to be seen.

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35. Samsung Galaxy S9+ review: the best big-screen smartphone by milesЧт., 08 марта[−]

Gorgeous screen and excellent camera are highlights of this top-end phone, but battery life could be improved

Having ushered in a new super-slim bezel design at the beginning of 2017 with the S8, has Samsung’s new dual-aperture, dual camera enough to entice people to upgrade?

It’s fair to say the Galaxy S9+ looks practically identical to its predecessor. It’s got the same curved glass design, metal sides and lump-less camera on the back, and while it is 1.4mm shorter, 0.4mm wider and 0.4mm thicker than the S8+, you’ll need a ruler to notice.

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36. Sonos One review: the best smart speaker for audiophilesЧт., 15 февр.[−]

The company’s first foray into smart tech adds Amazon’s Alexa to a great wireless speaker to create a formidable combo

Having practically invented the multi-room wireless speaker category in 2005, Sonos has lagged behind in the race to become smart. Now the Sonos One is here, packing Alexa in the top and premium audio in the bottom.

The Sonos One is very deliberately designed to look, feel and sound like the company’s successful Play: 1 – a compact wireless speaker launched in 2013 at about ?150 that was arguably the best for the money for years. Side-by-side they look identical apart from the top of the speaker, which is flat on the One, perforated by holes for the microphones that enable the voice assistant to hear you.

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37. Apple HomePod review: Siri lets down best sounding smart speakerВт., 13 февр.[−]

It’s the wifi speaker to beat in terms of audio but being locked in to Apple services is frustrating and its voice assistant is lacking

After much anticipation, and speculation that Apple has missed the boat and handed victory to Amazon’s champion Echo, the HomePod smart speaker is finally here. But is it actually any good? And why exactly does it cost four times as much as an Echo?

The HomePod is a voice-controlled speaker that listens out for its wake word “Hey, Siri” and then starts streaming what you say to Apple to interpret your commands and play whatever it is you wish. The fabric-covered cylinder stands an iPhone X-and-a-bit tall (172mm) with a diameter of an iPhone X (142mm), weighing 2.5kg (14.4 times the iPhone X).

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38. Amazon Echo Spot review: cute smart speaker with a screenПн., 05 февр.[−]

The firm’s latest Alexa-powered addition to its Echo range adds a clock and touchscreen interface to the mix

Amazon’s new Echo Spot is one of the most novel takes on a smart speaker yet, and while it is certainly more than just a smart clock, that’s what it’s best at – an attractive voice-assisted smart desk or bedside-table accessory.

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39. Ring Video Doorbell 2 review: deal with doorsteppers from your sofaЧт., 01 февр.[−]

This smart doorbell connects to your phone – but you might want to disable notifications when at work

The Ring Video Doorbell 2 adds the convenience of a front-door intercom to pretty much any home, and with minimal DIY skills required, meaning it’s never been easier to get rid of doorsteppers.

There have long been wifi-connected doorbells, for those envious of flat-dwelling friends with video intercoms adding that extra barrier between them and the outside world, but most of them require some sort of wiring to install.

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40. OnePlus 5T review: premium full-screen experience at half cost of iPhone XПн., 20 нояб. 2017[−]

OnePlus has done it again, producing a smartphone with almost its rivals’ high-end features, including 36-hour battery life, at an affordable price

The OnePlus 5T propels the Chinese company into the brave new era of full-screen smartphones, with a new 6in minimal bezel display squeezed into the body of a 5.5in device.

The 5T is OnePlus’s fourth phone in two years. Unlike the OnePlus 3 to 3T upgrade in 2016, the internal components for the 5T have mostly stayed the same as those of the OnePlus 5, with the screen and camera the biggest differences.

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41. iPhone X review: Apple finally knocks it out of the parkПт., 10 нояб. 2017[−]

The company’s most important smartphone in years does not disappoint, with Face ID and an all-screen design that spells the end of the home button

The iPhone X is Apple’s most important – and most expensive – new smartphone in four years, bringing with it a significant change to the design, dumping the home button to usher in a full-screen experience. Thankfully, Apple nailed it.

After four years of the company recycling the design of the iPhone 6, the iPhone X is a breath of fresh air. The beautiful OLED screen takes up pretty much the whole front of the device. It’s one of the best displays I’ve ever seen on a smartphone, and while it’s not quite as bezel free at the sides as Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Note 8 devices, it’s a giant leap forward for Apple.

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42. Huawei Mate 10 Pro review: say hello to two-day battery lifeЧт., 02 нояб. 2017[−]

Latest in series of powerhouse devices is best yet, with dual cameras, latest Android, fast performance and excellent stamina between charges

Huawei’s Mate smartphones have made a bit of a name for themselves as powerhouse devices that come with long battery life and a big screen. With a 50-hour battery life and premium design, the Mate 10 Pro ( find here) is no exception.

Huawei has tried to tread the fine line between being good value for money and offering a top-notch experience, but the Mate 10 is the Chinese firm’s first real winner.

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