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Latest Technology news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2018

 
 
1. NBN Co faces fines for 'horror' customer service under Labor planСб., 23 июня[−]

NBN operator could be punished for lengthy repair times and missed appointments, party says

The operator of the national broadband network could be fined for lengthy repair times and missed appointments under a Labor proposal to establish a wholesale service guarantee.

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2. The GPS app that can find anyone anywhereСб., 23 июня[−]
A UK-based startup has developed a geocoding tool that could revolutionise how we find places, from a remote African village dwelling to your tent at a rock festival

In common with perhaps 15 million South Africans, Eunice Sewaphe does not have a street address. Her two-room house is in a village called Relela, in a verdant, hilly region of the Limpopo province, five hours’ drive north-east of Johannesburg. If you visited Relela, you might be struck by several things the village lacks – modern sanitation, decent roads, reliable electricity – before you were struck by a lack of street names or house numbers. But living essentially off-map has considerable consequence for people like Eunice. It makes it tough to get a bank account, hard to register to vote, difficult to apply for a job or even receive a letter. For the moment, though, those ongoing concerns are eclipsed by another, larger anxiety. Eunice Sewaphe is nine months pregnant – her first child is due in two days’ time – and she is not quite sure, without an address, how she will get to hospital.

Sitting in the sun with Eunice and her neighbours outside her house, in a yard in which chickens peck in the red dirt, she explained to me, somewhat hesitantly, her current plan for the imminent arrival. The nearest hospital, Van Velden, in the town of Tzaneen, is 40 minutes away by car. When Eunice goes into labour, she will have to somehow get to the main road a couple of miles away in order to find a taxi, for which she and her husband have been saving up a few rand a week. If there are complications, or if the baby arrives at night, she may need an ambulance. But since no ambulance could find her house without an address, this will again necessitate her getting out to the main road. In the past, women from Relela, in prolonged labour, have had to be taken in wheelbarrows to wait for emergency transport that may or may not come.

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3. The truth about gaming disorder, from Fortnite to World of WarcraftПт., 22 июня[−]

As the number of young gamers has risen sharply, so have addiction narratives

Gaming disorder may be a newly recognised condition, but disordered gaming is anything but new. In 2010, a Korean couple was arrested for fatal child neglect spurred by an obsession with Prius Online. Five years earlier, another Korean man collapsed and died after a 50-hour session playing StarCraft in an internet cafe.

In the west, World of Warcraft, released in 2004, was one of the first games to trigger addiction narratives in the mainstream press, with the game blamed for causing college students to drop out of university and others losing careers and families.

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4. 'He was terrified of people': when gaming becomes an addictionПт., 22 июня[−]

Huge popularity of online games sparks fears over young people’s mental health

Kendal Parmar’s son went from being a sporty and sociable boy who loved school, to a child who would stay in his room and rarely go outside.

The change in his personality was down to a gaming disorder that crept up on him at the age of 12, when he started secondary school. Three years later, Joseph is still struggling with the problem.

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5. Tesla downsizing residential solar business bought for $2.6bnПт., 22 июня[−]

Company to close facilities and end Home Depot partnership after buying company founded by Elon Musk’s cousins

The electric car maker Tesla is sharply downsizing the residential solar business it bought two years ago in a controversial $2.6bn deal, according to three internal company documents and seven current and former Tesla solar employees.

The latest cuts to the division that was once SolarCity – a sales and installation company founded by two cousins of Tesla’s CEO, Elon Musk – include closing about a dozen installation facilities, according to internal company documents, and ending a retail partnership with Home Depot that the current and former employees said generated about half of its sales.

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6. What is Google doing with AI? Chips with Everything podcastПт., 22 июня[−]

Jordan Erica Webber chats to a panel of artificial intelligence experts about what Sundar Pichai’s seven objectives could mean in practice

Subscribe and review: Acast, Apple, Spotify, SoundCloud, AudioBoom, Mixcloud. Join the discussion on Facebook, Twitter or email us at chipspodcast@theguardian.com.

In April 2017, the US Department of Defense launched an Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team, otherwise known as Project Maven. The project uses Google’s artificial intelligence to analyse drone footage.

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7. Driver was streaming The Voice when Uber self-driving car crashed, say policeПт., 22 июня[−]

Rafaela Vasquez looked up half a second before Arizona crash that killed woman, report says

The “safety” driver behind the wheel of a self-driving Uber that hit and killed a pedestrian was streaming the television show The Voice on her phone at the time of the crash, police have said.

The collision that killed Elaine Herzberg, 49, who was crossing the road at night in Tempe, Arizona, was “entirely avoidable”, a police report said, if Rafaela Vasquez had been paying attention.

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8. Tesla whistleblower claims company is 'doing everything it can to silence me'Чт., 21 июня[−]

The electric carmaker is suing a former technician for alleged hacking, but he says he’s being scapegoated for leaking concerns

On Wednesday morning, Martin Tripp was an out-of-work Tesla technician trying to figure out what to do next.

By the end of the day, he had been sued by his former employer for alleged hacking and theft, engaged in a hostile email exchange with Elon Musk, come out as a whistleblower, and was being patted down by sheriff’s deputies over allegations that he was threatening to go to his former workplace and “shoot the place up”.

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9. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich quits over relationship with employeeЧт., 21 июня[−]

Tech firm says relationship was in violation of the company’s non-fraternization policy, which applies to all managers

Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich is resigning after the company learned of a consensual relationship that he had with an employee.

The company, one of the world’s largest makers of semiconductor chips, said that the relationship was in violation of the company’s non-fraternization policy.

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10. What is the best laptop drive for students?Чт., 21 июня[−]

James wants to know whether he should opt for an SSD or HDD to save his files on

I am hoping to go to university this year and am looking for a laptop. What’s the difference between an SSD and an HDD, and which would be better for a student? From what I’ve seen, you can get roughly four times as much storage on an HDD as you can on an SSD for the same price, so it seems an HDD would be the better option. James

The laptop market is moving from traditional “spinning rust” hard disk drives (HDDs) to chip-based, solid-state drives (SSDs) for several reasons. SSDs are more responsive; they consume less battery power; they are less likely to break when dropped and they take up a lot less space.

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11. Smartphone use in NSW schools could be restricted after reviewЧт., 21 июня[−]

Victoria says it will stick with decisions being made by individual schools

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The New South Wales government has announced a comprehensive review of smartphone use in schools, but the Victorian government says it is unlikely to follow suit.

On Thursday the NSW education minister, Rob Stokes, said the review – to be headed by a child psychologist, Michael Carr-Gregg – would examine the prevalence and effect of technology in classrooms, and would consult parents, teachers and education groups.

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12. Instagram launches long-form videos in bid to lure YouTube generationЧт., 21 июня[−]

Videos of up to an hour are effort to pull young users away from rival, and to allow Facebook to sell more ads

Instagram will increase its video time limit from one minute to 10 minutes for most users, in an attempt to lure younger viewers away from YouTube.

In the expansion, announced Wednesday, Instagram accounts with large audiences will be able to go as long as an hour. Video will be available through Instagram or a new app called IGTV. The video will eventually give Facebook, Instagram’s parent company, more opportunities to sell advertising.

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13. 'Facebook is taking everything': rising rents drive out Silicon Valley familiesСр., 20 июня[−]

Property companies advertising their proximity to Facebook’s campus are giving low-income residents a choice: pay a huge rent increase or move out

Sandra Zamora is quitting Facebook. Not because of Russian election interference, misuse of personal data or any of the social network’s other scandals.

For the 29-year-old, it’s personal: Facebook is her neighbor, and the company’s presence, she said, is wreaking havoc on her community.

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14. The 14 best video games of E3 2018Вт., 19 июня[−]

From samurai to cyberpunk via ancient Greece, here are the most exciting games from the 100s shown off at this year’s expo

An expansive third-person action game set on foreign planets, Anthem rides the coattails of Destiny, The Division and Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Wildlands, and promises wide multiplayer support that will continue long after it launches . At first glance it looks a lot like Destiny, with four players in mech exosuits blasting away at space creatures with rifles, pulse cannons, grenades and missiles. There’s a touch of Horizon Zero Dawn in some of the dino-shaped mechs, Monster Hunter in the lush, dramatic environment and wildlife and Halo in the enemies and weapon design. In combat, Anthem recalls Titanfall, as you transition from hovering, to dodging, landing, sprinting and swimming, experimenting with the weighty arsenal of weapons. Developer BioWare is known for great stories: we’ve seen none of that aspect of Anthem yet, but it feels great to play.
Release: 22 February 2019

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15. Flying cars: why haven't they taken off yet?Вт., 19 июня[−]

Despite their potential, no one has managed to take them from flight of fancy to everyday reality

In 1940, Henry Ford said: “Mark my words – a combination aeroplane and motor car is coming.” With flying taxis apparently on the way, it looks like he was right, but what a wait. Eight decades years later, “ dude, where’s my flying car?” is shorthand for any stuff “they” promised us that we haven’t got.

We have always wanted to fly, so, as soon as cars came on to the scene, we wanted those to fly too. Early blueprints for the US interstate highway grid even had adjacent runways ready for flying cars. But those never came. Now that concept of the flying “car” seems quaint or naive, a 20th-century dream fuelled by decades of sci-fi and the Jetsons, as obsolete as the model T. Yet as we’ll see, something just as good may take its place.

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16. 'It consumed my life': inside a gaming addiction treatment centreПн., 18 июня[−]

As the World Health Organization classifies gaming disorder as a mental health condition, one UK treatment centre reveals how it is trying to tackle the problem

Ian* was in his 20s when he started gaming in the mid-1990s. A long-time interest in building PCs had developed into an initially healthy interest in first-person shooters like Counter Strike and Team Fortress, which he’d play at weekends and when he came home from work.

It was the online element of these games, he says, that really changed his relationship to gaming, and what started as a hobby quickly took over his life.

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17. Fears mount over WhatsApp's role in spreading fake newsВс., 17 июня[−]

App blamed for circulating false information in India, Brazil, Kenya and now the UK

Abijeet Nath and Nilotpal Das were driving back from a visit to a waterfall in the Indian province of Assam earlier this month when they stopped in a village to ask for directions. The two men were pulled out of their car and beaten to death by a mob who accused them of stealing children.

“The villagers got suspicious of the strangers as for the last three or four days messages were going around on WhatsApp, as well as through word of mouth, about child lifters roaming the area,” Mukesh Agrawal, a local police officer said.

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18. How Peppa Pig became a video nightmare for childrenВс., 17 июня[−]

James Bridle’s essay on disturbing YouTube content aimed at children went viral last year. Has the problem gone away – or is it getting worse?

In November of last year, I read an article in the New York Times about disturbing videos targeted at children that were being distributed via YouTube. Parents reported that their children were encountering knock-off editions of their favourite cartoon characters in situations of violence and death: Peppa Pig drinking bleach, or Mickey Mouse being run over by a car. A brief Google of some of the terms mentioned in the article brought up not only many more accounts of inappropriate content, in Facebook posts, newsgroup threads, and other newspapers, but also disturbing accounts of their effects. Previously happy and well-adjusted children became frightened of the dark, prone to fits of crying, or displayed violent behaviour and talked about self-harm – all classic symptoms of abuse. But despite these reports, YouTube and its parent company, Google, had done little to address them. Moreover, there seemed to be little understanding of where these videos were coming from, how they were produced – or even why they existed in the first place.

I’m a writer and artist, with a focus on the broad cultural and societal effects of new technologies, and this is how most of my obsessions start: getting increasingly curious about something and digging deeper, with an eye for concealed infrastructures and hidden processes. It’s an approach that has previously led me to investigate Britain’s system of deportation flights or its sophisticated road surveillance network, and this time it took me into the weird, surreal, and often disturbing hinterland of YouTube’s children’s videos. And these videos are worrying on several levels. As I spent more and more time with them, I became perturbed not just by their content, but by the way the system itself seemed to reproduce and exacerbate their most unsavoury excesses, preying on children’s worst fears and bundling them up into nightmare playlists, while blindly rewarding their creators for increasing their view counts even as the videos themselves descended into meaningless parodies and nonsensical stories.

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19. Why does Trump hate Jeff Bezos: is it about power or money?Вс., 17 июня[−]

The owner of Amazon and the Washington Post keeps his counsel, spurring the president to ever-greater rage

Nestled between the embassy of Myanmar and the historic home of Woodrow Wilson, the biggest house in Washington DC is taking shape. A yellow digger is parked outside, construction workers throw sandbags over their backs, and thick black tubes stretch from high windows to the ground like the legs of a giant octopus. Inside, a foreman in a baseball cap sits behind a desk at a laptop. “Going good,” he says.

This will be the luxury home of Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, owner of the Washington Post and would-be first man on Mars. A sign on the corner of S Street in the swish Kalorama neighbourhood still points to the textile museum that occupied the 27,000 sq ft property before Bezos bought it for $23m. Along the row there are flags and signs supporting immigrants and gay rights; there are diplomatic outposts including the Irish ambassador’s residence. On one doorstep, the inevitable: a package from Amazon.

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20. The 10 biggest video game stories from E3 2018Сб., 16 июня[−]

Playstation, Xbox, Ubisoft, Bethesda, EA and more competed for the video game world’s attention this week in LA. Here’s what stood out.

E3 is the biggest video games news event of the year, where Playstation, EA, Xbox, Ubisoft and more compete to show off their latest games (and announce new ones) at flashy press conferences and ostentatious booths in the Los Angeles Convention Centre. Now that the onslaught of announcements, trailers and general showing-off from the week-long show is over, here are ten big stories that emerged from the chaos.

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21. Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes charged with criminal fraudСб., 16 июня[−]
  • Ex-president of blood-testing startup also charged
  • Pair appear in federal court hours after Holmes quits as CEO

Elizabeth Holmes, the founder of the startup Theranos, and the former company president, Ramesh Balwani, have been criminally charged with fraud for allegedly making false claims about the effectiveness of the company’s blood testing.

The pair appeared before the US district court in San Jose on Friday, hours after Holmes stepped down as CEO of the company, and were charged with two counts of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and nine counts of wire fraud. Both were released on $500,000 bail and ordered to surrender their passports.

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22. Satellite constellations and space junk: Chips with Everything podcastПт., 15 июня[−]

Jordan Erica Webber looks at what is currently happening in the world of space technology, including the burgeoning issue of space pollution

Subscribe and review: Acast, Apple, Spotify, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud. Join the discussion on Facebook, Twitter or email us at chipspodcast@theguardian.com.

Neil Armstrong was the first person to set foot on the moon, but, of course, this was not the first time we had sent something to space. In fact, we’ve been sending stuff up there since 1957, when the former Soviet Union launched Sputnik. And those 60 years have left their mark.

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23. Unravel Two review – adorable yarn adventure knits in co-op playЧт., 14 июня[−]

PS4, Xbox One, PC; Coldwood/EA
Throwing in a cute companion entwines players to solve puzzles together, but makes the gameplay over-dependent on action dynamics

The first Unravel game was a welcome surprise back in 2015, when it was announced by a nervous man holding a handmade yarn toy alongside publisher EA’s more traditional menu of guns, cars, and (foot)balls. This year, EA went one better, announcing and releasing an equally adorable sequel on the same day.

But despite appearances, Unravel Two is very different to its predecessor. The first was a solitary adventure in which a curious little character made of yarn explored a world much larger than him, dragging everyday objects around so he could clamber on to them, and using the unravelled thread of his body to build bridges or swing from branches. The second features similarly mundane but beautiful environments – from forests and streams to playgrounds and barns – but with two yarn characters that can be controlled by two players together. They are attached to each other, and there’s much more freedom of movement – bigger jumps, more momentum.

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24. Are there any laptops with decent keyboards?Чт., 14 июня[−]

Julia would buy a MacBook Pro Retina but she doesn’t like the latest version’s keyboard. What are the alternatives?

I recently upgraded to a used early-2015 MacBook Pro Retina because of Apple’s recent redesign of the MacBook Pro, which sliced off a little bit of thickness at the cost of various ports and the very reliable keyboard with scissor mechanism. Apple is facing class-action lawsuits over the new butterfly keyboards’ untimely breakage, and as my computer’s main job is to be a writing tool, I didn’t want to risk ending up with non-functional keys. Also, I have tried the new keyboard and I did not like the feel of it: travel seems too short and rather “flat” for my taste.

However, I find laptop keyboards across all platforms are becoming flatter and slimmer, and the only ones that appear to offer mechanical keyboards are flashy gaming laptops. There aren’t any for writers.

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25. Fortnite stars compete for $3m charity prize at E3 showdownЧт., 14 июня[−]

World’s favourite video game holds first major competition, watched live in LA by 15,000 fans and millions more online

Under the unforgiving LA sun, in front of a crowd of thousands, the first ever pro/celebrity Fortnite tournament took place on Tuesday afternoon, and anyone still mystified by the success of this brashly colourful multiplayer shooter would perhaps have been a lot wiser by the end. It was a fun spectacle, put on by the developer, Epic Games, for fans who screamed their support throughout the hour-long contest.

The set-up was simple. Fifty well-known Fortnite players – young adults who play every night for countless fans on YouTube and Twitch – were teamed up with 50 celebrities from the worlds of wrestling, television and music, with each pair taking part in an all-or-nothing match of the world’s most popular video game. In Fortnite’s famed Battle Royale mode, 100 players land on a giant island and must fight until only one player – or team – is left standing. Usually the prize is simply kudos, but here there was a $3m (?2.2m) pot to aim for, the money to go to charities chosen by the top-finishing duos.

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26. Tesla workers say they pay the price for Elon Musk's big promisesЧт., 14 июня[−]

The CEO is known for outsized claims and ambitious goals. But numerous factory workers say he doesn’t follow through – and that his leadership sets a troubling tone

It was “a master class in emotional intelligence”, raved the business magazine Inc, and “a powerful lesson in authentic, heartfelt leadership”.

Elon Musk, the chief executive of Tesla, had emailed his entire staff following the May 2017 publications of separate investigations by the Guardian and a workplace safety organization showing high injury rates at the company’s northern California electric car factory.

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27. Split California into three states? Billionaire's eccentric idea will get a voteЧт., 14 июня[−]

A proposal to divide the state in thirds will appear on the November 2018 ballot – but is it more than a stunt?

A proposal by the billionaire venture capitalist and Bitcoin investor Tim Draper to divide California into three separate states will appear on the November 2018 ballot after the “Cal 3” campaign garnered enough signatures for a statewide referendum.

Cal 3 is Draper’s latest effort to break up the country’s most populous state. In 2014, he spent $5.2m on a campaign to split the state into six pieces, but failed to qualify for the ballot when only about 750,000 of the 1.14m signatures collected were found to be valid.

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28. Tesla to cut 9% of staff as Elon Musk's electric car company seeks profitabilityВт., 12 июня[−]

CEO says thousands of job losses are part of a ‘difficult, but necessary’ restructuring

Tesla is slashing thousands of jobs, its chief executive, Elon Musk, announced Tuesday, as the electronic car company attempts to hit production targets and reach profitability.

Musk called the job cuts, which will affect about 9% of the company’s more than 40,000 employees, “difficult, but necessary” in a tweet that contained the email he had sent to employees announcing the layoffs.

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29. E3 2018: Microsoft's gaming chiefs on the future of XboxПн., 11 июня[−]

The company is investing in studios in attempt to win over next generation of gamers

When you think of Microsoft, you probably think of Word or Windows first; omnipresent computer software that, despite its usefulness, does not elicit enormous excitement. Xbox is different. At E3 each year, the video games industry’s biggest event, Microsoft packs out a stadium-sized room with fans for its annual press conference, many of whom have travelled from all over the world. People are passionate about Xbox and its games – Minecraft, Halo, Gears of War – in a way that nobody is about Microsoft Office.

Microsoft’s most senior figures appear to have woken up to this relatively recently. Phil Spencer, who ran Xbox’s game development studios for years, was made executive vice-president of gaming within the company in September 2017. This finally put Xbox on equal footing with Windows and Office within Microsoft – and put a gamer in the room with the CEO and CTO of the company. This has meant big changes for the Xbox business, and apparently huge investment in creative video game talent.

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30. Can technology help dementia patients? Chips with Everything podcastПт., 08 июня[−]

An exhibition in London looked at how digital touch technologies could reconnect a person in care with their loved ones

Subscribe and review: Acast, Apple, Spotify, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud. Join the discussion on Facebook, Twitter or email us at chipspodcast@theguardian.com.

Touch is a fundamental part of human interaction. Even when our communication is mitigated by technology, as it so frequently is nowadays, it’s often via some sort of touchscreen. But as far as physical interaction with other human beings in the same space, some people think we’re living through a crisis of touch, especially when it comes to older people.

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31. Scooters dumped on US city streets yell: 'Unlock me or I'll call the police' – videoПт., 08 июня[−]

Scooters from the tech startup Lime issue verbal warnings to those who touch them without paying. The scooters, scattered on streets in major cities, shout: 'Unlock me to ride me or I'll call the police!' There was no evidence the devices actually made the call

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32. How can I back up my holiday photos without using a laptop?Чт., 07 июня[−]

Graham and his wife take thousands of photos while travelling but aren’t always near wifi – is there a cloudless alternative?

We take thousands of photos on our caravan holidays, and I like to back them up every day or so. At present, I take a laptop and an external hard drive, so I have a copy on the laptop in the caravan plus a copy on the hard drive in my car.

Is there a way to make backups from SD cards to hard drives without carrying a laptop? I should add that many of the caravan sites we visit do not have wifi, so cloud backup is not practicable. Graham

Backing up photos used to be a problem for people taking exotic holidays. I thought it had gone away, thanks to advances in technology.

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33. iOS 12: everything you need to know about new iPhone featuresВт., 05 июня[−]

Apple has unveiled its new OS for its smartphones and tablets. What does it mean for notifications, privacy and emoji?

Apple has unveiled all the new features heading to iPhones and iPads at its developer conference in San Francisco on Monday, including speed boost for even older devices, improved privacy and a host of new features.

The look of iOS 12 will be very familiar, with the company focusing on improving the experience and the underlying software rather than simply splashing on a new coat of paint.

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34. How can I get faster broadband in a rural area?Чт., 31 мая[−]

Broadband is slow on June’s farm and BT wants ?16,000 to install something faster. What are the options?

We’re a rural family of six with three businesses on site and we have three landlines in order to be able to use broadband. It is a disaster – usually less than 1MB, peaks occasionally at 4MB – and sometimes the kids have to go to the village to do homework.

Why isn’t BT forced to enable rural homes with the same deals that city people get? BT wanted to charge ?16,000 to connect us!

BT isn’t forced to offer rural homes the same deals as city people because – as your ?16,000 quote illustrates – it would cost too much. BT is busy extending its high-speed network to rural areas but the British government, via the DCMS’s Broadband Delivery UK ( BDUK) scheme, and local authorities are contributing to the cost.

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35. Whatever happened to that $35,000 Tesla Model 3 you still can’t buy?Пт., 25 мая[−]

As tax credits threaten to run out and more powerful and expensive versions launch, buyers are still waiting

This week saw Tesla’s enigmatic chief executive Elon Musk take to Twitter to announce two more powerful, and more expensive, versions of the auto firm’s Model 3 – the much lauded “mass market” vehicle that appears, for now, to be veering further and further away from its $35,000 price tag.

The new dual-motor Model 3 and its souped-up range-topping “performance” version, which costs $78,000 and, as Musk claims, will be 15% quicker than German rival BMW’s $66,500 (?59,905 in the UK) M3, are not unexpected. Tesla did a similar thing with its Model S, launching dual-motor and performance versions with ever more dizzying price tags.

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36. Five things we learned from Mark Zuckerberg's European parliament appearanceСр., 23 мая[−]

The format didn’t let MEPs question the Facebook boss too deeply – but there were worries over its monopoly

1. The European Parliament’s chosen format was a terrible way to elicit answers from one of the most powerful people in the world.

Mark Zuckerberg’s appearance in front of the European parliament’s conference of presidents was a long-awaited opportunity to press the founder of the world’s biggest social network – which also owns Instagram and WhatsApp – on his company’s global influence and use of personal data following the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

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37. Tories will struggle to turn desire to regulate internet into policy | Jim WatersonВс., 20 мая[−]

Matt Hancock wants to rein in internet excess – just don’t ask him how it will work in reality

Towards the end of the Conservatives’ 2017 general election manifesto was a largely overlooked chapter setting out the party’s stance on the future of the internet.

“Some people say that it is not for government to regulate when it comes to technology and the internet,” it said. “We disagree.”

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38. Huawei P20 Pro review – the three-camera iPhone killerСр., 25 апр.[−]

The Chinese smartphone maker has hit a home run with this top-end smartphone that’s on a par with the best

With the P20 Pro, Huawei has not only proved that it can compete with the likes of Apple and Samsung, but it can beat them in many ways. Three cameras really are better than one (or two).

Having established its name in value smartphones, Huawei has recently made inroads into the premium market with the likes of the Mate 10 Pro and last year’s P10. They were of high quality, and had all the features you’d expect from an iPhone or Samsung Galaxy S. But until now they’ve not quite captured the same luxurious feel.

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39. Samsung Galaxy S9+ review: the best big-screen smartphone by milesЧт., 08 марта[−]

Gorgeous screen and excellent camera are highlights of this top-end phone, but battery life could be improved

Having ushered in a new super-slim bezel design at the beginning of 2017 with the S8, has Samsung’s new dual-aperture, dual camera enough to entice people to upgrade?

It’s fair to say the Galaxy S9+ looks practically identical to its predecessor. It’s got the same curved glass design, metal sides and lump-less camera on the back, and while it is 1.4mm shorter, 0.4mm wider and 0.4mm thicker than the S8+, you’ll need a ruler to notice.

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40. Sonos One review: the best smart speaker for audiophilesЧт., 15 февр.[−]

The company’s first foray into smart tech adds Amazon’s Alexa to a great wireless speaker to create a formidable combo

Having practically invented the multi-room wireless speaker category in 2005, Sonos has lagged behind in the race to become smart. Now the Sonos One is here, packing Alexa in the top and premium audio in the bottom.

The Sonos One is very deliberately designed to look, feel and sound like the company’s successful Play: 1 – a compact wireless speaker launched in 2013 at about ?150 that was arguably the best for the money for years. Side-by-side they look identical apart from the top of the speaker, which is flat on the One, perforated by holes for the microphones that enable the voice assistant to hear you.

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41. Apple HomePod review: Siri lets down best sounding smart speakerВт., 13 февр.[−]

It’s the wifi speaker to beat in terms of audio but being locked in to Apple services is frustrating and its voice assistant is lacking

After much anticipation, and speculation that Apple has missed the boat and handed victory to Amazon’s champion Echo, the HomePod smart speaker is finally here. But is it actually any good? And why exactly does it cost four times as much as an Echo?

The HomePod is a voice-controlled speaker that listens out for its wake word “Hey, Siri” and then starts streaming what you say to Apple to interpret your commands and play whatever it is you wish. The fabric-covered cylinder stands an iPhone X-and-a-bit tall (172mm) with a diameter of an iPhone X (142mm), weighing 2.5kg (14.4 times the iPhone X).

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42. Amazon Echo Spot review: cute smart speaker with a screenПн., 05 февр.[−]

The firm’s latest Alexa-powered addition to its Echo range adds a clock and touchscreen interface to the mix

Amazon’s new Echo Spot is one of the most novel takes on a smart speaker yet, and while it is certainly more than just a smart clock, that’s what it’s best at – an attractive voice-assisted smart desk or bedside-table accessory.

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43. Ring Video Doorbell 2 review: deal with doorsteppers from your sofaЧт., 01 февр.[−]

This smart doorbell connects to your phone – but you might want to disable notifications when at work

The Ring Video Doorbell 2 adds the convenience of a front-door intercom to pretty much any home, and with minimal DIY skills required, meaning it’s never been easier to get rid of doorsteppers.

There have long been wifi-connected doorbells, for those envious of flat-dwelling friends with video intercoms adding that extra barrier between them and the outside world, but most of them require some sort of wiring to install.

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44. iPhone X review: Apple finally knocks it out of the parkПт., 10 нояб. 2017[−]

The company’s most important smartphone in years does not disappoint, with Face ID and an all-screen design that spells the end of the home button

The iPhone X is Apple’s most important – and most expensive – new smartphone in four years, bringing with it a significant change to the design, dumping the home button to usher in a full-screen experience. Thankfully, Apple nailed it.

After four years of the company recycling the design of the iPhone 6, the iPhone X is a breath of fresh air. The beautiful OLED screen takes up pretty much the whole front of the device. It’s one of the best displays I’ve ever seen on a smartphone, and while it’s not quite as bezel free at the sides as Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Note 8 devices, it’s a giant leap forward for Apple.

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45. Huawei Mate 10 Pro review: say hello to two-day battery lifeЧт., 02 нояб. 2017[−]

Latest in series of powerhouse devices is best yet, with dual cameras, latest Android, fast performance and excellent stamina between charges

Huawei’s Mate smartphones have made a bit of a name for themselves as powerhouse devices that come with long battery life and a big screen. With a 50-hour battery life and premium design, the Mate 10 Pro ( find here) is no exception.

Huawei has tried to tread the fine line between being good value for money and offering a top-notch experience, but the Mate 10 is the Chinese firm’s first real winner.

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