The Guardian23:46 Текст источника в новой вкладке
Latest news, sport, business, comment, analysis and reviews from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2018

 
 
1. Man stabbed to death on busy London street23:20[−]

No arrests yet made after victim killed on Upper Street, Islington, at 6.30pm on Monday

A man has been stabbed to death on a busy street in broad daylight in north London.

The victim, who has not yet been named, died in Upper Street, Islington, at around 6.30pm on Monday.

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2. Serena Williams will not be seeded for French Open after maternity leave return23:06[−]
  • Former world No1 is ranked No453 after maternity leave
  • American is a three-time singles champion at Roland Garros

The French Open announced on Monday it will not give Serena Williams a seeding for her return to grand slam tennis following maternity leave.

“This year again, tournament officials will establish the list and ranking of the women’s seeds based on the WTA ranking,” the French Tennis Federation said in a statement. “Consequently, [the seeds] will reflect this week’s world ranking.”

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3. 'The right thing to do': Jeremy Corbyn reacts to Livingstone's resignation – politics live23:06[−]

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen

Some senior Labour figures have been offering their reactions to the news of Livingstone’s resignation:

Good riddance Ken. pic.twitter.com/YnPApTQhJh

Ken Livingstone's exit from the Labour Party is welcome, but he should have been expelled. We must now make it clear that he will never be welcome to return. His vocal cheerleaders and supporters should follow him out the door.

So glad to finally see the back of Ken Divisive Livingstone. There’s no space for him and his abhorrent views in my Labour Party.

Ken Livingstone ( @ken4london) remains a towering figure of the Labour movement. He popularised progressive socialism and was labelled a 'Loony Lefty' nearly 40 years ago for his efforts to champion public services, stand up for marginalised groups and fight all forms of racism.

After all his talk of tackling anti-Semitism, Jeremy Corbyn couldn’t even bring himself to sack Ken Livingstone.

People will note that Corbyn’s response to Livingstone’s years of vile comments about Jews and Hitler was to say “Ken Livingstone’s resignation is sad”!

Pathetic!

Continuing his round of media interviews after the announcement of his resignation from Labour, Livingstone has told Sky News the party’s disciplinary structure is dominated by “right-wingers”.

He also offered support to a former party activist, Marc Wadsworth, who was expelled for accusing the Jewish Labour MP, Ruth Smeeth, of working “hand in hand” with a Daily Telegraph journalist. Claiming that Jewish people exert control over the media is a common antisemitic trope. Wadsworth has insisted he did not know Smeeth’s background when he made the comments.

Well, yeah but, unfortunately, this disciplinary panel structure that was set up under Tony Blair is filled with old right-wingers, who have been expelling lefties like me for years. Now, Jeremy’s slowly getting a grip on that but it takes a lot of elections to change the balance of that.

And so, this is going to go on. We saw last week Marc Wadsworth being expelled simply for making a criticism of a Labour MP.

Well yeah, I mean, literally, one of the things that really gave me strength to get through all this was, in the weeks after my suspension two years ago, somewhere between 30 and 40 Jewish people came up to me on the street and said: ‘We know what you said is true, don’t give in’. One woman said to me: ‘Don’t these MPs read their history?’ Sadly, they don’t.

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4. Frank Ocean's Blonde dissected: 'A cultural artefact that deserves to be studied'23:01[−]

Cole Cuchna of the podcast Dissect is devoting his third season to Frank Ocean deep dives – and aims to unpack a record extraordinarily rich in detail

In 2016, the eagerness for a new Frank Ocean record had transformed from healthy anticipation into irritable impatience. For four years Ocean had made repeated promises about the record’s release date, only for him to miss his own deadlines. Fans desperate for new music began mocking his tardiness on social media. Ocean responded in kind by stamping all the record’s missed released dates on a library card.

next time frank ocean drops an album everyone wait like 12 weeks before they buy it.. just so he knows what it’s like

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5. Royal Wedding photos: first official pictures of Duke and Duchess of Sussex released22:49[−]

Photographs by Alexi Lubomirski include group pictures featuring Prince Harry and Meghan’s wedding entourage

The first official photos of the newly married Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been released by Kensington Palace. Taken by Alexi Lubomirski, the photos include one depicting the couple with the page boys and flower girls who assisted them during Saturday’s ceremony.

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6. National Die-In Day: US high schoolers to protest inaction on gun control22:44[−]

High school senior spearheads protests planned for Washington, Orlando and beyond on anniversary of Pulse nightclub shooting

American high school students are organizing a National Die-In Day on 12 June to protest continued government inaction on gun control laws. The action will take place on the second anniversary of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, and will include a die-in at noon in front of the Capitol in Washington DC and another in Orlando. The teenage organizers are hoping to spark additional die-in protests at state capitols and town halls across the country – “anywhere with lethal legislative inaction”, as one tweet put it.

The founder of the die-in day, Amanda Fugleberg, is an 18-year-old high school senior from Orlando who previously organized a walkout to protest gun violence at her high school in March. Fugleberg said the die-in in Washington would last 12 minutes.

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7. Interview magazine closes, ending a 50-year survey of Manhattan cool22:43[−]

Magazine founded by Andy Warhol closes after months of turmoil, including a lawsuit brought over back pay and the resignation of a fashion director accused of sexual misconduct

Interview magazine, the famous art, fashion, entertainment and pop culture journal of downtown New York founded by Andy Warhol in 1969, has closed down, according to company sources.

The magazine was owned by Peter Brant, a billionaire art collector, who acquired the magazine in 1989. Its closure comes after months of turmoil, including staff being locked out as part of rent dispute, a lawsuit brought by a former editorial director over back pay and the resignation of a fashion director accused of sexual misconduct.

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8. Jamie’s Quick and Easy Food review – stress-free family cooking22:30[−]

Whack it in a tray … smash it out … it’s fast, it’s furious, it smells incredible … yep, Jamie Oliver’s back – and this time it’s all about the love

When TV chefs taste something they have just made, they are never disappointed, are they? Hmm, could have done with five more minutes in the oven, a bit less salt, not one of my best, frankly … No, everything is always bloody marvellous. For Jamie, especially. He’ll close his eyes, look up, shake his head, barely able to comprehend what he has just created. “That, my friends, is a mighty, mighty beautiful pasta,” he says of his spicy ’nduja vongole. His creation, his work; it’s like me saying: “That, my friends, is a mighty, mighty beautiful opening paragraph.”

He’s doing his stripped-back cooking; restricted to only five ingredients. It has completely changed his life and it is going to take the stress out of ours, too, he says. He is doing it to Back to Life by Soul II Soul – that is how stress-free it is, it is like the summer of ’89, before you had kids, remember?

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9. Ex-footballer Terry Butcher accuses British army of failing his son22:26[−]

Former England captain tells inquest how Christopher, 35, died after developing PTSD

The former England football captain Terry Butcher has accused the British army of failing his son, who died after developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Butcher told an inquest on Monday that Christopher, 35, had turned to alcohol and drugs after being discharged from the armed forces in April 2015, due to the mental health condition.

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10. May: customs backstop to only apply in 'very limited' circumstances22:25[−]

Remarks follow Boris Johnson saying Brexiters expect PM to avoid triggering mechanism

Theresa May has said that her backstop plan to keep Britain aligned to the customs union beyond 2020 would only apply in a “very limited” set of circumstances as Brexiters ratcheted up pressure on her over the future customs relationship.

The prime minister said nobody wanted the UK to resort to the option despite persuading her “war cabinet” to sign up to new proposals last week, marking rare progress on Brexit after weeks of deadlock.

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11. Unai Emery set to be named as new Arsenal manager22:20[−]
• Former PSG and Sevilla manager has impressed club hierarchy
• Mikel Arteta had been the favourite to replace Ars?ne Wenger

Arsenal have moved to appoint Unai Emery, the former PSG and Sevilla manager, as the successor to Ars?ne Wenger.

The club have conducted a thorough process as they look to replace Wenger, their manager of almost 22 years, who departed at the end of this past season.

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12. Marseille: at least one injured after hooded men open fire on young people22:20[−]

Reports say group of hooded men armed with Kalshnikov rifles opened fire on young people near a cultural centre

At least one person has been injured after a group of hooded men armed with Kalshnikov rifles opened fire on young people near a cultural centre in Marseille, local media has reported.

The gunmen arrived in three vehicles and opened fired at the centre in the Busserine area, according to La Provence newspaper.

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13. Bercow admits using word 'stupid' as he tries to defuse Leadsom row22:01[−]

Speaker has been accused of calling Leadsom a ‘stupid woman’, which he denies

The House of Commons Speaker, John Bercow, has sought to defuse a row with the government by admitting he muttered the word “stupid” during a disagreement with the leader of the house, Andrea Leadsom, but denied insulting her personally.

In the chamber last Wednesday Bercow was accused of having said in an aside that Leadsom was a “stupid woman”, and swearing before describing her as “useless”, prompting Downing Street to say such language would be unacceptable.

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14. Human race just 0.01% of all life but has destroyed over 80% of wild mammals – study22:00[−]

Groundbreaking assessment of all life on Earth reveals humanity’s surprisingly tiny part in it as well as our disproportionate impact

Humankind is revealed as simultaneously insignificant and utterly dominant in the grand scheme of life on Earth by a groundbreaking new assessment of all life on the planet.

The world’s 7.6 billion people represent just 0.01% of all living things, according to the study. Yet since the dawn of civilisation, humanity has caused the loss of 83% of all wild mammals and half of plants, while livestock kept by humans abounds.

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15. Scientists find secret behind sweet sound of Stradivarius violins22:00[−]

The instruments achieve their sweetness and brilliance by mimicking aspects of the human voice, study says

The violins made by the Italian masters Andrea Amati and Antonio Stradivari are celebrated as the finest ever made, but the secret behind their perfect sound has mystified experts for centuries.

Now scientists in Taiwan believe they have hit on an answer. Using software normally reserved for speech analysis, they found that violins from the two Cremonese luthiers mimic aspects of the human voice, a feature they argue adds to the instruments’ exceptional musical quality.

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16. Danny Cipriani could make his England comeback in full-back role21:30[−]
• Cipriani set for first game under Eddie Jones against Barbarians
• Nathan Hughes returns to stake claim for South Africa tour spot

Danny Cipriani could make his first England appearance under Eddie Jones in the No 15 jersey after he was named among the full-backs in the squad to face the Barbarians on Sunday. Nathan Hughes will also get the chance to stake a claim for the South Africa tour after he and Cipriani were among six losing Premiership semi-finalists selected in Jones’s 35-man squad.

Cipriani won his last England cap in a 2015 World Cup warmup match with an eye-catching cameo against France from full-back and it is a position he often played in his first spell with Wasps. Jones said when he named Cipriani in the touring party as an inside back that “I’ve seen him play 15 well as a younger guy and there’s no reason he couldn’t do that now”, and his selection among the full-backs for Sunday’s match suggests Jones will try him there at some point against the invitational side.

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17. New Sunderland owner says sacked Chris Coleman could return to club21:22[−]
• Stewart Donald confirms takeover and that club now debt-free
• ‘I wouldn’t rule out potentially talking to Chris’ says Donald

Stewart Donald, the new owner of Sunderland, has raised the startling possibility of Chris Coleman returning as manager after revealing he will pay Ellis Short ?40m for the now League One club over the next two years.

The former Eastleigh owner, speaking for the first time since the Football League ratified his takeover, said that all previous debts had been erased and Sunderland would benefit from a “pretty hefty” third tier transfer budget. He then proceeded to refuse to rule out the chance of Coleman making an extraordinary comeback.

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18. Russian activity in City of London faces further scrutiny by MPs21:11[−]

Second select committee to examine issue as UK law firm criticised for advising oligarch

A second select committee of MPs is expected to examine how Russian companies use the City of London after the foreign affairs committee singled out the corporate law firm Linklaters for its role in advising on last year’s flotation of Oleg Deripaska’s En+.

Parliamentary sources indicated that the Treasury select committee would take up the subject as part of its inquiry into economic crime and that Linklaters could again be asked to appear, potentially creating a confrontation with a law firm that has so far refused to give evidence.

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19. Grenfell inquiry opens to emotional testimony from survivors21:06[−]

Chair pledges tributes to those who died in fire would be treated as ‘integral evidence’

A series of highly charged and emotional tributes to those who died in the Grenfell Tower fire launched a long-awaited public inquiry into the disaster as its chair, Sir Martin Moore-Bick, pledged that survivors’ testimony would be treated as “integral evidence” in proceedings which could run into 2020.

Mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, aunts and nieces of the dead were among those who spoke or provided statements about their loved ones as the inquiry began just over 11 months after the fire, which Moore-Bick described as “the single greatest tragedy to befall [London] since the second world war”.

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20. Part of M20 to be used as lorry park to counter Brexit jams at Channel21:02[−]

Stretch of Kent motorway may be temporarily repurposed under latest contingency plans

A stretch of the M20 in Kent will be used as a temporary lorry park should Brexit result in queues forming at Channel ports, under the latest government contingency plans.

A contraflow system, named Operation Brock, would operate between junctions eight and nine southbound to allow traffic to continue in both directions on reduced lanes, while thousands of lorries are held in line before the border.

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21. Australia and UK urged to strike free-trade deal to counter Trump's protectionism21:00[−]

Exclusive: Agreement could rebuild trust in trade liberalisation, thinktanks argue

Sign up to receive the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning

Australia and the United Kingdom have been urged to negotiate a high-quality free-trade agreement to help rebuild public trust in trade liberalisation.

The agreement should include labour and environmental standards but not a controversial investor dispute settlement clause, says new research from two progressive thinktanks, the McKell Institute in Australia and Demos in the UK.

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22. The Guardian view on AI in the NHS: a good servant, when it’s not a bad master | Editorial20:42[−]
The NHS collects vast amounts of data. It must be used in imaginative ways that respect privacy and make life better for patients and health workers

Technology helps us live better and for longer; in fact it has been doing so since the birth of modern medicine. And as each new technology comes into use, it turns out to have medical uses, even though these are not always the ones that are sold hardest: in the 1920s the American press was full of advertisements for the health benefits of radium, which was then a mysterious and powerful substance just as artificial intelligence (AI) is today. AI won’t work miracles or make death unnecessary by letting people upload their minds into silicon, but it might catch cancers earlier. The prime minister on Monday said that 30,000 lives a year would be saved by 2030, mostly through earlier and more accurate diagnosis. This is about 10% of the annual cancer death rate in Britain. It is possible to object that the money would be better spent on less glamorous initiatives, such as hiring enough care workers, nurses and doctors and paying them all properly. But while that is certainly very urgent, there is no need to choose between the two approaches. We need both.

At the same time, one of Britain’s biggest health trusts, University College London Hospitals (UCLH), announced a partnership with the Alan Turing Institute, a body that collects the AI expertise of British universities, which looks realistically promising. It starts from the question of how the NHS can use AI, rather than asking how AI can rescue the NHS, which of course it can’t. There is a huge contrast here with some of the earlier attempts in this direction, in particular the partnership between Google’s subsidiary DeepMind and the Royal Free hospital, which was widely and rightly criticised because Google gained access to the benefits of data that had been collected from patients and by the trust without any of the patients having consented to this. Indeed, they could not have given informed consent in many cases, because the use to which their data would be put was literally unthinkable at the time when it was collected. Privacy alone is an inadequate framework in which to place all the problems that arise with the collection and exploitation of data.

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23. The Guardian view on Saudi women drivers: going backward | Editorial20:41[−]

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman will give women the right to drive. But if they ask for anything else he says they can go straight to jail

Saudi Arabia is about to lift the ban on women driving. So it has started jailing defenders of women’s rights instead. This sounds like a scene from Through the Looking-Glass where the Red Queen announces that what seems obvious is the opposite of what is really obvious. This time the role of logic-defying royal is played by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who will end the embarrassment of Saudi Arabia being the only nation to ban women from driving, but only, it seems, give those who stay quiet the right to drive.

In a country where many women have wider grievances than driving, the crown prince did not want the female activists who had campaigned for years for an end to the wrong-headed discrimination to become a model for revolt. Instead of arguments, the heir to the Saudi throne wanted silence. Having won a battle, the activists had made it plain that they were having none of it. They have paid for their pluck with their liberty, ending up behind bars while Saudi media besmirch their reputation as “traitors”. The protesters should be congratulated for taking a stand.

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24. Doors, backpacks and Ritalin: what Republicans have blamed school shootings on20:40[−]

A list of what’s really behind America’s epidemic of gun violence, according to NRA-funded Republicans

This year, there has been, on average, one school shooting a week where someone was hurt or killed in America. According to a Washington Post analysis, the number of people killed in American schools in 2018 is “nearly double” the number of people who have been killed while serving in the military. There is nowhere else in the world, barring war zones, where kids have to worry about dying in their classrooms.

And yet, instead of taking steps to implement commonsense gun control, many politicians are taking to the media to explain, yet again, that guns aren’t actually the cause of gun violence. No, the real cause of mass shootings, the Texas lieutenant governor, Dan Patrick, explained on Saturday, is doors. “There are too many entrances and too many exits to our over 8,000 campuses in Texas,” Patrick said. “There aren’t enough people to put a guard in every entrance and exit.” Patrick’s call for “door control” was quickly mocked. Indeed, former government ethics director Walter Shaub pointed out that “Texas has stricter regulations for doors than it does for guns”.

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25. Barack and Michelle Obama to make films for Netflix20:32[−]

Former US president and first lady will develop ideas for films and documentaries

Barack and Michelle Obama have signed a deal with Netflix to produce films and documentaries for the TV streaming giant.

The former US president and first lady will develop ideas for potential shows on service including “scripted series, unscripted series, docu-series, documentaries and features”.

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26. Desire can deliver Champions League dream for Liverpool, says J?rgen Klopp20:31[−]
• Klopp says his team can overcome experience of Real Madrid
• Adam Lallana and Emre Can increase Klopp’s selection options

J?rgen Klopp believes Liverpool’s bravery, work-rate and desire for a sixth European Cup can compensate for Real Madrid’s greater experience when the sides meet in the Champions League final. Saturday’s contest in Kiev will be Real’s fourth Champions League final in five years, with Zinedine Zidane’s holders aiming to lift the trophy for a third consecutive season. No club has won a hat-trick of European Cups since Bayern Munich in 1974, 75 and 76.

Liverpool’s recent European record pales by comparison but having reached a first final in 11 years with several exhilarating performances and scored a competition record 40 goals en route, their manager is confident his team’s virtues can prove decisive in Ukraine.

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27. Leveson 2: government to be taken to court over cancelled inquiry20:26[−]

Campaigners convince high court the decision should be subject to a judicial review

Press regulation campaigners have been given the go-ahead to take the government to court over its decision to cancel the second part of the Leveson inquiry into the activities of the media.

The culture secretary, Matt Hancock, announced this year that he would cancel the second part of the public inquiry, established after the 2011 phone hacking scandal, on the basis that the media landscape had changed and justice had been served through the criminal trials of many of those involved.

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28. Meryl Streep and Oprah Winfrey among stars signing gender equality letter20:19[−]

Tina Fey, Chadwick Boseman and Ryan Reynolds are among 140 celebrities aiming to shine light on the world’s poorest women

Oprah Winfrey, Meryl Streep and Ryan Reynolds are among the stars who have signed a letter aimed at global gender equality.

Related: NoRA: Alec Baldwin and Amy Schumer join new anti-NRA initiative

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29. Even now Labour voters back remain. The party must show that they matter | Zoe Williams20:05[−]

There are lessons from the Lewisham East selection process. For all the arguments and jockeying, the soft Brexit candidate won

Lewisham East, for which Labour has just chosen its prospective parliamentary candidate, is a diverse south London constituency of quite widespread deprivation, yet also has some giant houses and rich people. It is the scene of generative and committed community organising – against the necessity for food banks, against the closure of its hospital – and some trenchant and passionate activists in both its constituency Labour party and Momentum branches. “Trenchant and passionate” sounds like a euphemism for infighting, and sometimes it is.

The Momentum meeting last month to elect its new committee was so fraught that half the room walked out and reconvened in the pub. Yet this is what local politics should look like, if it’s to mean anything: there will be battles; people will not always agree; not everything will be solved by persuasion; it’s in the DNA of activism that some people will be very annoying. Local groups are kept alive by debate, and wither when they bury their divisions and argue instead about who is the most loyal, or realistic.

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30. Most common childhood cancer 'partly caused by lack of infection'20:00[−]

Childhood acute leukaemia is caused by genetic mutations and a lack of childhood infection, scientists say

Clean modern homes, antiseptic wipes and the understandable desire to protect small babies against any infection are all part of the cause of the most common form of childhood cancer, a leading expert has concluded after more than 30 years of research.

Childhood acute leukaemia, says the highly respected Prof Mel Greaves, is nothing to do with power lines or nuclear fuel reprocessing stations. Nor is it to do with hot dogs and hamburgers or the Vatican radio mast, as have also been suggested. After the best part of a century of speculation, some of it with little basis in science, Greaves – who recently won the Royal Society’s prestigious Royal Medal – says the cancer is caused by a combination of genetic mutations and a lack of childhood infection.

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31. Jos Buttler will trust instincts in ‘luxury role’ for England against Pakistan20:00[−]
• 27-year-old accepts that his Test return will divide opinion
• Buttler will stop ‘trying to be something I’m not’ in first Test

Jos Buttler has admitted he is a luxury in England’s re-fitted Test team and that his return will divide opinion. But as the side’s most potent white-ball weapon prepares for a third stab at the longest format, he says the plan this time is to play on instinct.

How Buttler fares in the series with Pakistan that starts at Lord’s on Thursday will make one of the most intriguing subplots during the early Test summer as Joe Root’s side look to return to winning ways after their winter of discontent.

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32. Trump attacks former CIA director ahead of Haspel's swearing-in19:59[−]

Trump suggested John Brennan was to blame for Robert Mueller’s investigation, referencing remarks from Fox & Friends

Donald Trump praised the new CIA director, Gina Haspel, at her swearing-in ceremony on Monday, saying there was “no one in this country better qualified” for the job.

Related: After Trump attacks New York Times, Giuliani tells paper Mueller will be done by September

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33. Toxic mushrooms in Iran kill 11 people and poison more than 80019:57[−]

Up to 10 provinces, mostly in west of country, affected by mass fungi poisoning

At least 11 people have reportedly died in Iran after eating toxic mushrooms.

Emergency services in up to 10 provinces, mostly in the west of the country, reported that more than 800 people had become ill after mushroom poisoning and scores had been taken to hospital. It is unclear what kind of mushroom those affected had eaten.

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34. AI may well be the future but the Maybot gives it a bad name | John Crace19:53[−]

Either the PM is playing a canny long game on Brexit or self-destruction is her default setting

Maybe it was too much time in front of the TV watching the royal wedding. Or maybe it was just too long in the sun. Whatever it was, our politicians appeared to have returned from their weekends even less able to think straight than normal. Even the four pot plants, who can normally be relied upon to be the sole repository of sanity, were beginning to wilt.

Theresa May had woken up desperate to talk about something other than how her government was failing to deal with Brexit. So she had hopped on a train to Macclesfield to stand in front of Jodrell Bank – beam me up, Scotty! – where she could give a regulation off-the-peg speech about how British science was going to save the world. In particular, artificial intelligence.

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35. Network Rail appoints new chief – with smaller pay packet than predecessor19:50[−]

Andrew Haines takes job after eight years at Civil Aviation Authority marked by cost cutting

Network Rail has announced that Andrew Haines will be its new chief executive – and be paid 27% less than his predecessor to run Britain’s rail infrastructure.

Haines, the chief executive of the Civil Aviation Authority, will be paid ?588,000 including benefits, with a possible 9% bonus, when he takes over in the autumn following a short handover period with retiring boss Mark Carne.

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36. Brexit must benefit Scotland to avoid 'complacency' over independence19:43[−]

Ruth Davidson says emotional bonds of the union must be restored as SNP calls for second referendum

Ministers should make sure Brexit properly benefits Scotland amid potential complacency over the possibility of another independence referendum, the Conservative leader in the country, Ruth Davidson, has argued.

In a speech in London following Nicola Sturgeon’s comments on Sunday in which she vowed to “restart a debate” on independence, Davidson said it was important to restore the emotional bonds of the union after Brexit.

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37. FTSE 100 hits record high as markets digest US-China tariff truce19:34[−]

Pound falls 0.4% against the dollar, boosting overseas earners in the UK’s leading index

The FTSE 100 soared to a new record on Monday after news of a truce in the contentious trade dispute between the US and China cheered investors and helped send the pound lower against the dollar.

News that the world’s two largest economies had backed away from a potentially disastrous trade war and agreed to abandon plans to raise tariffs on each other’s exports lifted the UK’s leading index to a peak of 7868.12, the first time it has climbed above 7800.

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38. Most GDPR emails unnecessary and some illegal, say experts19:21[−]

Many firms have the required consent already; others don’t have consent to send a request

The vast majority of emails flooding inboxes across Europe from companies asking for consent to keep recipients on their mailing list are unnecessary and some may be illegal, privacy experts have said, as new rules over data privacy come into force at the end of this week.

Many companies, acting based on poor legal advice, a fear of fines of up to €20m (?17.5m) and a lack of good examples to follow, have taken what they see as the safest option for hewing to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): asking customers to renew their consent for marketing communications and data processing.

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39. Venezuela: Maduro hails election win but world leaders threaten sanctions19:15[−]

President faces flurry of condemnation over Sunday’s vote as Boris Johnson says ‘we may have to tighten the economic screw’

The Venezuelan president, Nicol?s Maduro, faced a barrage of international criticism – and the threat of fresh and potentially destabilising economic sanctions – as the British foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, warned that the international community “may have to tighten the economic screw on Venezuela” after Sunday’s contentious election.

Maduro secured a second six-year term in power on Sunday, shrugging off allegations of vote-buying and electoral fraud to claim what he called a historic, heroic and truly popular victory.

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40. Manuel Pellegrini set to be confirmed as West Ham’s new manager19:14[−]

• Chilean agrees three-year deal after talks with David Sullivan
• Pellegrini will be given full control of transfers at London club

Manuel Pellegrini is set to be announced as West Ham United’s new manager after holding talks with the club’s co-owner David Sullivan in London on Monday.

Pellegrini has agreed a three-year deal worth ?10m a year with West Ham, who parted company with David Moyes last week, and it is understood that the Chilean will be given full control of transfers by Sullivan, who had announced his intention to appoint a “high-calibre” appointment after the departure of Moyes, who walked away after the club openly began speaking to other candidates for his job. West Ham’s first choice was Rafael Ben?tez but they were forced to make alternative plans after seeing the Spaniard was minded to stay at Newcastle United.

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41. Martin Rowson on the royal wedding aftermath – cartoon19:12[−]
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42. The seminal film posters of Bill Gold – in pictures19:05[−]

Throughout his illustrious career, designer Bill Gold was one of Hollywood’s most defining poster creators, behind the designs for everything from Casablanca to The Exorcist. He died at the age of 97 on 20 May and to celebrate his work, here are some of his greatest posters with quotes from Gold himself

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43. Did you solve it? The birthday birthday problem19:00[−]

The solution to today’s puzzle

In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following problem:

Ariel, Balthazar and Chastity are great mates, genius logicians and they always tell the truth. Neither Ariel nor Balthazar know the day or the month of Chastity’s birthday, so she decides to tell them in the following way:

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44. Is Abramovich at last paying the price for being too close to Putin?18:58[−]

Chelsea’s owner is vulnerable to UK retaliation because of his proximity to Russian president

There is a compelling, two-word explanation for why Roman Abramovich is apparently having difficulties renewing his British visa: Vladimir Putin.

According to reports from Moscow, Abramovich was unable to watch his Chelsea team’s 1-0 victory over Manchester United in Saturday’s FA Cup final at Wembley because his investor’s visa expired last month. His private Boeing jet has not been back to the UK since 1 April.

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45. The age of punk: Debbie Harry looks back on a defining era18:37[−]

As a new exhibition in New York celebrates classic punk images from the 70s and 80s, members of Blondie recall the era

When most people see a beat-up car abandoned on a street, they rubberneck for a second and move on. When Debbie Harry saw one lying upside down on a midtown Manhattan street in 1976, she thought, what a great place for a photo shoot! “It seemed really funny and glamorous to get a shot of me crawling from the wreckage,” said the Blondie singer as she gazed at the photo.

Related: Moving the needle: the punk badges that defined the 1970s music scene

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46. Bad breath, Serena's shoes, and Henry who? Your royal wedding debrief18:32[−]

With the pageantry out of the way, we can take stock of the slightly odder things about Meghan and Harry’s nuptials

It’s almost a British tradition: waking up on the Monday after a frantic wedding weekend, once the fog of Sunday’s hangover has cleared, you can finally face looking back through social media feeds to see if your hazy recollections can really be true.

And after a royal wedding, a whole nation can join in the fun of recalling the odder moments during the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

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47. Google sued for 'clandestine tracking' of 4.4m UK iPhone users' browsing data18:18[−]

Collective action seeking up to ?3.2bn for claims Google bypassed privacy settings of Apple’s Safari browser

Google is being sued in the high court for as much as ?3.2bn for the alleged “clandestine tracking and collation” of personal information from 4.4 million iPhone users in the UK.

The collective action is being led by former Which? director Richard Lloyd over claims Google bypassed the privacy settings of Apple’s Safari browser on iPhones between August 2011 and February 2012 in order to divide people into categories for advertisers.

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48. Roman Abramovich may have to explain source of wealth to get UK visa18:18[−]

Chelsea owner’s application still being considered after the Russian’s previous visa expired

Roman Abramovich, the owner of Chelsea Football Club, could be asked to explain the source of his vast wealth before he is granted a new UK visa.

The Russian oligarch’s investor visa application is still being considered after his previous one, which was granted before tighter regulations were introduced in April 2015, expired.

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49. The ethics of wearing feathers: it's not just live-plucking that's a problem17:56[−]

They are fluttering down catwalks and even appeared at the royal wedding, but for some activists all feathers are stolen property – whether or not they involve cruelty

The red carpet has been a hotbed of sartorial protest this year, with influential people opting to express their politics through their wardrobe. But as many celebrities scramble for the moral high ground, some controversial guests have slipped under the radar. They go by a few names – marabou, ostrich, peacock – and accompanied Angelina Jolie to the Critics’ Choice awards, Lupita Nyong’o to the Cannes film festival and Katy Perry to the Met Gala.

Yes, feathers are suddenly everywhere again – not only in the wardrobes of glossy style icons, but also on embellished fascinators (as worn by the Duchess of Cornwall at the royal wedding) and in a sizeable proportion of the nation’s pillows, parkas and duvets. Yet, in some quarters, there is a growing discomfort with them.

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50. 'Sometimes dancing, sometimes furious': a girl shot dead in Gaza17:40[−]

Wesal Sheikh Khalil was an ordinary teenager confronting an extraordinary political situation

The family of Wesal Sheikh Khalil say that in a matter of weeks the teenager experienced a complete transformation, from a hop-scotching child to an adolescent infuriated by injustice in Gaza.

“You are cowards,” she screamed at her aunts when they refused to join protests at the border, where health officials say Israeli forces have killed more than 110 and shot thousands since demonstrations began in late March.

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51. Antony Gormley: Subject review – this art thesis fails the viva17:36[−]

Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge
As the famous artist returns to his alma mater’s town, he could do with a rigorous professorial interview about his art

Antony Gormley floats in space with his eyes fixed on infinity. His arms and legs are straight and relaxed, his posture passive and meditative as he hangs about half a metre above the floor.

Wake up, it’s time for a tutorial. What does this cast-iron replica of your own body bolted to a wall by its feet mean, exactly? I don’t want to hear a lot of vacuous guff about “activating spaces” and “undermining our assurance about the stability of the world”, Gormley. Finals are in a few weeks and you urgently need to clarify your thinking.

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52. How we made The Blair Witch Project17:35[−]

‘We were listed as deceased on IMDb. Our parents started getting condolence calls’

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53. The pope says God made gay people just as we should be – here’s why his comments matter17:03[−]

Francis’s reported remarks show a new Catholic acceptance of LGBT people and confirm what many of us have always known: God doesn’t make mistakes

It is immensely powerful to hear that Pope Francis, the leader of the Roman Catholic church, reportedly told Juan Carlos Cruz, a gay man: “God made you like this and loves you like this.”

Cruz is a survivor of clerical abuse who spoke privately with the pope a few weeks ago, and has since reported his conversation to Spanish newspapers. His abuser, Fernando Karadima, was found guilty of abuse by the Vatican in 2011.

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54. Tips, links and suggestions: what are you reading this week?17:00[−]

Your space to discuss the books you are reading and what you think of them

Welcome to this week’s blog. Here’s our roundup of your comments and photos from last week.

War was a frequent subject for discussion last week. Ben Macintyre’s Operation Mincemeat kept beerbart intrigued:

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55. What is GDPR and how will it affect you?16:40[−]

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation comes into force this week – here’s what it means

You could be forgiven for thinking that Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a law created to fill your inbox with identikit warnings from every company you have ever interacted with online that “the privacy policy has changed” and pleas to “just click here so we can stay in touch”.

But GDPR is far more than just an inbox-clogger. The regulation, seven years in the making, finally comes into effect on 25 May, and is set to force sweeping changes in everything from technology to advertising, and medicine to banking.

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56. Simon Yates and Tom Dumoulin set for time trial battle that could decide Giro16:26[−]
• Yates takes 2min 11sec lead into Tuesday’s time trial
• Dumoulin says Yates’s climbing strength gives him overall edge

Since the 2018 Giro d’Italia route was announced last November, one day has loomed large: Tuesday 22 May, date of the 34.2km time trial from Trento to Rovereto. With the race delicately poised after a series of mountain-top battles between Lancashire’s Simon Yates and last year’s winner Tom Dumoulin, those expectations look set to be fully justified.

There is an exquisite irony in the focus on a single time trial during a Giro packed with legendary and fearsome ascents: Etna, Gran Sasso, Monte Zoncolan, the Colle delle Finestre and Monte Jafferau. But this time trial always suggested a scenario for the 2018 race which has a simplicity about it which is both brutal and beautiful: Dumoulin will gain time here in spades, so it is up to his rivals to gain it elsewhere.

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57. Asteroid from another star system found orbiting wrong way near Jupiter15:27[−]

For the first time, a permanent member of our solar system has been found to have originated elsewhere

A permanent visitor from interstellar space has been found in our solar system, astronomers studying an asteroid orbiting our sun have revealed.

While collisions with Earth by comets and asteroids from within our solar system are thought to have brought organic material and water necessary for life to emerge, experts say the latest discovery suggests bodies from beyond the solar system might have also have played a role.

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58. Gymnasts and a mass wedding: Monday's top photos15:10[−]

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world

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59. Windrush migrants still sleeping rough one month after minister's promise15:04[−]

People sleeping on benches or relatives’ sofas while waiting for Home Office meetings, the Guardian has found

Vulnerable members of the Windrush generation are still living in destitution on the streets, despite government promises to sort out the crisis that led to thousands of people being wrongly targeted by a government crackdown on illegal immigrants.

The Guardian has heard of at least a dozen Windrush citizens who have been sleeping rough or staying in temporary accommodation while they wait for a decision on their legal right to remain in the UK.

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60. Ripped jean tanlines: The curse of summer 201815:00[−]

Are you wearing fashionably distressed denim? Do your knees look like two lobsters in a paddling pool full of milk? Here’s how to avoid this summer’s tanning faux-pas

Name: Ripped-jean tanlines.

Age: As old as ripped jeans themselves.

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61. Should I feel guilty about dressing my daughter as a 'girly girl'?15:00[−]

I never felt anything but delight about dressing my son, but the glee of putting my baby girl in a dress quickly gave way to guilt – and then anger

I put my baby in a dress for the first time the other day and it felt great. What’s not to love about a pair of tiny bulging legs encased in white tights poking out of a sundress? OK, full disclosure: a pink sundress. Then I felt guilty, as if it were somehow unfeminist of me to delight in my daughter looking like a “girly girl”. And then I felt angry, because, well, she is a girl. I was once a girly girl myself and still managed to grow into a raging bisexual feminist. How did we get to the point where it is girls’ stuff – as opposed to the way gender is circumscribed from the moment of birth – that has become shameful?

For the first nine months of her life, my daughter has worn her brother’s hand-me-downs. A lot of stripes, because in the facile world of childrenswear, stripes equal male. Basically, she was mistaken for a boy at least once a day, which is what happens in a society that presumes every baby is a boy unless a bow circumnavigates its balding head. I don’t give a damn – babies are babies – but it does say something about how early stereotyping starts. And how easily we fall prey to default male syndrome.

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62. Madama Butterfly/Der Rosenkavalier review – Glyndebourne openers perplex, provoke and charm14:36[−]

Glyndebourne, Sussex
Annilese Miskimmon’s stripped-back Puccini update and an admirable but uneven Strauss revival opened this year’s summer festival

Glyndebourne’s new season opens with a pair of revivals. Annilese Miskimmon’s staging of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly, first seen during the 2016 tour, is new to the main festival. Richard Jones’s production of Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier premiered in 2014. Both divided opinion when new, and both are essentially anti-Romantic in stance, stripping away the veneer of sentimentality that each work has accumulated over time.

Miskimmon’s Butterfly is more a reworking than a straight revival, though the basic concept remains the same. She updates the opera to the closing years of the American occupation of Japan, and places the narrative in the wider context of an exploitative system that offers local girls the possibility of escaping poverty by becoming GI brides and allows US servicemen to take advantage of conveniently dissolvable marriages. Two years ago, Miskimmon’s anger rode roughshod over the opera’s humanity, resulting in a hardness of edge that sat uneasily with the score’s emotive force. This time round, greater subtlety of detail combined with striking performances allows the drama fully to hit home.

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63. Let’s criminalise the men buying sex, and spare the women they exploit | Sophie Walker14:15[−]
A new report lays bare the brutal realities of life for sex workers in Britain. The law must now change to protect them

“You know when you buy something and it doesn’t work properly, the first thing you will do is pick it up and shake it. The same principle applies to prostitution. If your mouth isn’t open wide enough or your throat isn’t deep enough. So you are always at risk of being raped or abused if the buyer feels he is not getting what he paid for.”

Mia de Faoite spent six years in prostitution. During those years she was raped numerous times, including a vicious gang rape, and physical assaults were a common occurrence. She is one of many survivors and activists working to smash the myth of the happy hooker, the smiling professional escort offering “sex work” to grateful, respectful men. It’s a powerful image that is promoted relentlessly by the vastly wealthy sex industry to normalise prostitution. But an important report published on Monday makes clear that this violence and coercion is not an unintended and manageable consequence of an otherwise empowering profession. It is the whole modus operandi.

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64. Yuval Noah Harari: Brexit will not halt drive to 'human unification'13:19[−]

New book by bestselling historian argues global challenges will make nations ever more interdependent

Brexit could prove to be a mere bump on the road toward “human unification”, according to a new book by bestselling historian Yuval Noah Harari, which warns politicians against becoming distracted by the rise of nationalism in the world.

The Israeli academic, whose first book, Sapiens, became a surprise publishing sensation by charting the rise of the human species, turns his attention to current affairs for the first time with a swipe at what he argues is a short-sighted response to global challenges in countries such as the UK, US, Russia and Israel.

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65. 'We are who we are': what these 100-year-old women teach us about beauty13:00[−]

A glimpse into the lives and rituals of centenarian women, whose beauty is rarely acknowledged

This piece was part of the GroundTruth Project series Emerging Photographers.

When I started shooting this story, I wished to talk about elderly women’s conditions in general, but I had no clear idea about what angle I was going to take. I took pictures of nothing and everything surrounding these centenarians from the Mont?r?gie region in Qu?bec, Canada. But one thing kept occurring: every single woman I photographed wanted to groom herself to make sure she would look good in my pictures. This is how it became a story about beauty.

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66. Street smart: 10 of the best casual trainers - in pictures12:44[−]

Office to evening, these trainers are suitable for any occasion. Keep it simple with classic white or jazz it up with some colour

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67. Sanja Matsuri festival – Yakuza day in pictures11:15[−]

Sanja Matsuri festival is a celebration of the three legendary founders of Sensoji Temple in the Asakusa neighbourhood, with nearly two million people visiting during the three-day event.

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68. MFON: women photographers of the African diaspora – in pictures10:30[−]

The MFON journal and book by Laylah Amatullah Barrayn and Adams Delphine Fawundu is committed to establishing and representing a collective voice of female photographers of African descent and features more than 100 from across the diaspora. MFON is named in memory of Mmekutmfon ‘Mfon’ Essien, a visionary photographer who died from breast cancer aged 34 in 2001. MFON has a legacy grant available to emerging black female photographers of African descent

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69. Own a limited-edition print from photographer Eamonn McCabe09:00[−]

The award-winning sports photographer Eamonn McCabe, a former Guardian head of photography, looks back at his favourite sporting images from the 1970s and 80s. Limited-edition prints are now available for sale

  • Order your limited-edition Eamonn McCabe print here
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70. Irish abortion referendum: voters on both sides prepare to head home08:00[−]

With the referendum on a knife-edge, Irish citizens all over the world will flock home to vote

From Berlin to Toronto, Maastricht to Los Angeles and London, Irish citizens based all over the world will be flocking home this week to vote in what looks set to be a knife-edge abortion referendum.

Cambridge, Oxford, London and Nottingham universities have opened up bursaries to help students fly to Ireland for the historic poll on Friday, while elsewhere voters have got funding from friends and family to make their voice heard.

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71. Death in the sun: Australia's 88-day law leaves backpackers exploited and exposed03:48[−]

The 2017 death of Olivier Caramin joins a growing list of problems backpackers can face in rural jobs, including rape, harassment and underpayment

Martin Hand knew something was wrong as he watched a fellow backpacker stagger down the road in the searing heat of a Queensland summer.

Hand, a British traveller, had been picking pumpkins on a farm near Ayr, a small country town 10km (6 miles) from the coast, along with other young backpackers including a 27-year-old Belgian, Olivier “Max” Caramin.

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72. Sunday's best photos: tattoos, crowns and a flying taxiВс., 20 мая[−]

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including an Everest record-breaker and flower show preparations

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73. The 20 photographs of the weekСб., 19 мая[−]

Demonstrations in Gaza, preparations for the royal wedding, the Europa League final and the Cannes film festival – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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74. How Anna White is learning to walk and talk again – videoПт., 18 мая[−]

Anna White was left with severe disabilities following routine appendix surgery. She was unable to walk or talk and her life changed for ever. But after a long fight for compensation, White is now able to pay for intensive therapy. This is the story of her remarkable recovery

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75. The lives of Grenfell Tower: the 72 victims of the fireПн., 14 мая[−]

Portraits of all 72 people who died in the Grenfell Tower fire, based on moving testimony from family, friends, colleagues and acquaintances

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76. Ars?ne Wenger at Arsenal: a complicated legacy of self parody – videoСб., 12 мая[−]

As Ars?ne Wenger said farewell to the Emirates – a stadium that, as much as anything, will stand as his legacy – the mind was drawn back to the end of the season 14 years ago. Back in 2004, Arsenal had gone through the league unbeaten and, as pundits queued up to add their plaudits, Amy Lawrence asked presciently: 'Is this as good as it gets for Arsenal?' It turned out it was. FA Cup wins followed but would it be too harsh to dismiss those successes as yesterday’s manager winning yesterday’s competition with yesterday’s football?

Quiz: 22 questions on Wenger's 22-year reign at Arsenal

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77. Why Eurovision is so much more than a song contest – videoПт., 11 мая[−]

Love it or hate it, it’s Eurovision time again. The event aims to be a fun pop contest and is so successful that it's even broadcast to Australia and China. But there is more to the competition than music with political and cultural statements. This year the contest takes place in Lisbon. You can watch the Eurovision song contest at 8pm on BBC One


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78. Nothing is off limits at the Menopause Cafe – videoПт., 11 мая[−]

From hot flushes to sleepless nights, all conversation are welcome at the menopause cafes that are popping up across the country. They provide a space for women to come together and talk about their bodies in a way they may never have before

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79. 'The Germans sneeze loudly': refugees on their adopted homelands - videoЧт., 10 мая[−]

A record number of refugees arrived in Europe between 2015 and 2016. First comes the excitement but soon they realise it is not entirely like home. Two years have passed and refugees living in UK, Spain, France and Germany tell whether reality met their expectations.

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