The Guardian15:24 Текст источника в новой вкладке
Latest news, sport, business, comment, analysis and reviews from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2018

 
 
1. Trump tells Putin at Helsinki summit: 'I really think the world wants to see us get along' - live updates15:23[−]

US president Donald Trump says relations with Russia have ‘never been worse as he arrives for high-stakes summit with Vladimir Putin. Russia says it agrees

The White House has confirmed that Putin and Trump will hold another bilateral meeting with more aides present after their tete-a-tete. There will also be a joint press conference.

The joint press conference had been due to take place at around 4.50pm local time, (2.50pm BST).

Happening Now: President Trump has a 1:1 bilateral meeting with President Putin. Later they will hold an expanded bilateral meeting and a joint press conference.

Donald Trump has dealt a fresh blow to hopes that he will confront the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, over election interference as they met on Monday, blaming his own country rather than Moscow for poor diplomatic relations.

Apparently dismissing the cold war, when the superpowers stood on the brink of all-out nuclear war, the US president wrote on Twitter: “Our relationship with Russia has NEVER been worse thanks to many years of U.S. foolishness and stupidity and now, the Rigged Witch Hunt!”

Related: Donald Trump blames US 'witch-hunt' for poor Putin relations

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2. World Cup 2018: France celebrations continue and tournament memories – live!15:16[−]

Thomas Krantz, writing from Gothenburg, is attempting to deal with the post-World Cup blues in the only way we football people know how: by watching more football: “Thank god one of the world’s biggest youth tournaments (Gothia Cup) is in town, otherwise I might actually miss football. Here are IFK G?teborg playing Leeds United (Boys 17). High tempo, audacious skills and great movement, so it’s almost as if it never ended. No VAR controversies though.”

Nick Miller back now from lunch (chicken sandwich, salt & vinegar crisps, banana for later), with thanks to John for dropping the D.Trump hand grenade ready for my return. Reminder: emails to Nick.Miller.casual@theGuardian.com, tweet @NickMiller79

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3. Theresa May ready to cave in to hardline Brexiters' demands15:02[−]

PM set to cede on customs bill rather than allow Rees-Mogg to stage show of strength

Theresa May is preparing to cave in to hardline Brexiters over amendments to the customs bill rather than allow Jacob Rees-Mogg and colleagues to stage a show of parliamentary strength.

As the prime minister tries to sell her Chequers deal on Brexit to the public and her own backbenchers, the European Research Group (ERG) of pro-Brexit MPs tabled four amendments to the legislation last week.

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4. Trump winks at Putin at start of Helsinki summit - video15:02[−]

Donald Trump poses with Vladimir Putin for a photocall in Helsinki on Monday. The US president, who says: 'I really think the world wants to see us get along,' can be seen winking at the Russian president

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5. Wildfire weapon, two presidents and a hippo: Monday's top photos15:02[−]

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world

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6. How bad fake beards and Joss Stone’s accent ended the Tudors’ reign15:00[−]

As the show ploughed ever faster through Henry’s wives to reach the end, its characters aged and its lusty energy waned

With its conspiring nobles, bloody executions and explicit sex, The Tudors was a proto-Game of Thrones. In its prime, it was a show as overstuffed with titillation as the prominent codpieces it displayed. The very first episode, for example, features Henry Cavill deflowering a maiden; from then on no aspect of Tudor history was safe from being eroticised. Composer Thomas Tallis has an unhistorical, though undeniably racy, gay romp with a courtier, and other characters get this gay-washing, too. Which is inclusivity of a sort. I guess.

There was more to The Tudors than just bonking and beheading, however. Sam Neill, Jeremy Northam and James Frain all play advisers to King Henry VIII who, despite their loyal service to the throne, come to gore-spattered endings. A childish and petulant ruler who casts aside his servants at whim? Put this on TV today and no one would miss its pertinence. Kings and popes strut across the screen in a flurry of insults and violence, with Peter O’Toole portraying a delightfully sensuous and worldly Pope Paul III. Performances such as these gave us two great seasons of The Tudors, with both history and histrionics in an entertaining mix.

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7. China files WTO challenge over US tariffs, as its economy slows – business live14:52[−]

All the day’s economic and financial news, including new growth figures from China and the IMF’s latest World Economic Outlook

London’s stock market has fallen into the red, as City traders fret about the risk of a tradw war.

The FTSE 100 has shed 88 points, or over 1%, to 7573. After a slow start, equities took a hit as the oil price fell, hitting shares in energy producers and miners.

The FTSE’s initially meagre losses gathered pace as Monday went on, the index dragged lower by its commodity stocks.

With Brent Crude slipping 1.1%, and copper down 0.7%, both suffering in light of China’s Q2 slowdown, the FTSE’s hefty oil and mining ended up in the red, dragging the UK index lower in the process.

Getting back to trade, the boss of asset management giant BlackRock has warned that Donald Trump’s trade dispute with China will hurt growth.

Larry Fink told Bloomberg TV that America’s economy would suffer if the White House imposes tariffs on an extra $200bn of Chinese imports (as it threatened last week).

GDP will slow down dramatically.....we’ll have even more uncertainty about the state of the world.

BLACKROCK'S FINK SAYS IF WE HAVE FULL TARIFF WARS, SEES MARKETS DOWN 10-15%

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8. UK unveils new Tempest fighter jet to replace Typhoon14:50[−]

Government to spend ?2bn to develop aircraft between now and 2025

The defence secretary, Gavin Williamson, has unveiled plans for a new RAF fighter jet, the Tempest, which will eventually replace the Eurofighter Typhoon.

Speaking at the Farnborough airshow, Williamson unveiled a model of the sixth-generation fighter jet the Ministry of Defence (MoD) expects to emerge from its new combat air strategy, designed to maintain the UK’s status as a so-called “tier one” military power after Brexit.

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9. UK politicians 'failing to rise to the challenge of climate change'14:45[−]

Government’s top climate adviser warns policymakers will be judged harshly by future generations if they don’t act now

The government’s official climate change adviser says politicians and policymakers are failing to rise to the challenge of a rapidly warming planet and will be judged harshly by future generations unless they act now.

Lord Deben, chair of the UK’s Climate Change Committee (CCC), said “anyone who read the news” could see mounting evidence of alarming trends – from melting polar ice to record heatwaves and rising sea levels. He called on politicians to “make the connections” between these events and act with more urgency.

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10. World Cup 2018: Guardian writers pick their highs and lows14:41[−]

From Modric’s magic and Pavard’s screamer to unwelcome theatrics and wearing the wrong T-shirt, our writers give their take on the tournament in Russia

Match of the tournament Russia v Croatia had it all: a spectacular goal from Denis Cheryshev, unbearable tension during a see-sawing extra-time period, raucous celebrations when M?rio Fernandes equalised and then shootout heartache for the hosts – followed quickly by an acknowledgment that they should hold their heads high.

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11. Shock over ruling that 'brides of Christ' need not be virgins14:34[−]

Consecrated virgins say they are disappointed by Vatican’s new guidance

Christian women who have pledged lifelong virginity as “brides of Christ” have expressed shock at a Vatican document that suggests literal virginity is not a prerequisite for their consecration.

The Vatican’s new instruction on consecrated virginity, Ecclesiae Sponsae Imago, was published earlier this month after requests from bishops who reported an increasing number of women being called to the vocation.

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12. 'I'm tired of the suffering': how poverty-stricken families struggle to survive in Nigeria | Isaac Linus14:28[−]

Families living on ?1.50 a day or less tell of the hardships of life in the oil-rich nation, which now has the greatest concentration of extreme poverty

Nkechi John, 39, lives in a single room with her four children and husband, who is a welder. Their daily lives are fairly typical of people in poverty in Nigeria, which according to the Brookings Institution now has the world’s greatest number of extreme poor.

“Life is tough and everybody is complaining,” she says. “I used to sell akara [bean cake]. I could make around 1,000-1,200 naira [?2-?2.50] profit every day, but now I can’t even make 400 naira. People don’t have money to buy it because there are no jobs.

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13. Latitude festival – teenage fans bring energy to middle-class kingdom14:23[−]

Henham Park, Suffolk
Big names like the Killers, alt-J and a surprise Liam Gallagher flounder, but there’s buried treasure from Nao, IAMDDB and Octavian lower down the bill

This time next year, you might hear some album-of-the-decade buzz around Solange and her leftfield R&B masterpiece A Seat at the Table. But featherlight blues and sober reflection are a tough sell live, particularly to holidaying punters drunk in rural Suffolk. “I want to turn this festival into church,” Solange informs the few thousand gathered, who were possibly happy with just a festival. It doesn’t help that her hour-long set, for all its laidback charm, doubles as a meticulous avant-garde dance show. So it’s a minor miracle when, midway in, her gentle punches start to land. “Fuck Trump,” she mutters at one point, and the congregation roars in agreement.

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14. Tube station renamed Gareth Southgate after World Cup run14:23[−]

Signage at Southgate station in north London changed for 48 hours to honour England coach

A London Underground station has been temporarily renamed for Gareth Southgate after he led England to their best World Cup performance since 1990.

The England manager’s forename has been added to signage on the platforms, in the ticket hall and outside the Grade II-listed Southgate station, in Enfield, north London, which will remain Gareth Southgate station for 48 hours.

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15. RFL’s ?2m losses include over ?300,000 to part company with Nigel Wood14:20[−]
• Former chief executive’s severance deal revealed in accounts
• Depreciation in Odsal Stadium’s value contributed to losses

The former chief executive of the Rugby Football League, Nigel Wood, will be paid more than ?300,000 as part of his severance package from the game’s governing body: almost a sixth of the total losses of more than ?2m which the RFL incurred last year.

Related: Tributes paid to amateur rugby player who died mid-match

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16. A second referendum during Brexit negotiations would be absurd | Simon Jenkins14:12[−]
Justine Greening’s suggestion fails to acknowledge that the current parliamentary deadlock is party political

Justine Greening endorses second Brexit referendum

An eerie truth is starting to dawn. Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn agree on Brexit. They are both realists. They know Britain needs a customs union with the EU. Perhaps they should go off to a Welsh mountain together, and do a Trump/Putin? Either way, it is time for parliament to offer united support to Britain’s negotiators in Brussels, as it did to the leave decision on article 50.

On Sunday, May’s former education secretary, Justine Greening, added to her misery by calling her Chequers negotiating compromise a fudge. All compromises are that. In truth Chequers was a tactical way-station to the inevitable: a customs union. It was not ideal, but it was progress, and anything else is fantasy. Greening complains May’s union would leave Britain with “no say on shaping” EU trade rules. But that is what leave meant. In reality, Norway, the US, even China, have plenty of say on trade rules with the EU where it affects them. Trade on goods with the EU is a trivial aspect of Brexit.

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17. Rachel Roddy’s recipe for plum granita14:00[−]

Iced treats are a summer staple, and this one is simple and simply delicious

Unlike ice-cream, which is evergreen, sorbet and granita don’t really have a role from late autumn to early spring. Like suncream and sandals relegated to the back of the wardrobe, fruit ices are sent to the back of the mind during the months of jumpers and thick soup, except maybe for a Christmas palate cleanser.

Their return is directly related to the weather. As days get warmer – and, this year, sweltering – smooth scoops and icy shards progress from being a novelty, to a pleasure, to a relief, to an absolute necessity.

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18. 100: UnEarth review – love and war in the Lost Gardens of Heligan13:59[−]

Lost Gardens of Heligan, Cornwall
This haunting outdoor show created by WildWorks fuses ancient myth with a tale of returning soldiers

Hidden among the roses, a soldier and his lover kiss goodbye. Through a clearing in the trees, blindfolded captives are repeatedly executed. Three men sit on a manicured lawn; roses bloom from their faces as bombs drop overhead. 100: UnEarth, part of the UK’s first world war centenary arts programme 14-18 NOW, is a fitfully moving promenade show, which asks the difficult question: how do we learn to live and love again after the devastation of war?

The show has been created by WildWorks, the site-specific Cornish theatre company founded by Bill Mitchell, who died last year. This is their second piece set in The Lost Gardens of Heligan, a beautiful and slightly eerie botanical garden that was, itself, almost wiped out by the war.

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19. Gareth Bale set to stay at Real Madrid as Cristiano Ronaldo’s successor13:59[−]
  • Bale expecting positive talks with new coach Julen Lopetegui
  • Forward was open to move with Manchester United interested

Gareth Bale is set to be handed the challenge of replacing Cristiano Ronaldo as Real Madrid’s driving force when he meets his new coach, Julen Lopetegui, for talks in the next two weeks.

The move will disappoint Jos? Mourinho as Bale is a long-term target of the Manchester United manager. Mourinho is leading the club’s pre-season tour of the US, the squad having flown to Los Angeles on Sunday.

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20. Croatia’s World Cup run must bring end to game’s neglect back home | Aleksandar Holiga13:55[−]

Pride at their final efforts could lead to a new national stadium but lack of grassroots investment is a more pressing concern

The defeat was hard to accept, as was missing a chance that is not likely to come again in the lifetime of these players or fans. Everyone thought Croatia deserved more but the nation still celebrated, rather than mourning. Crowds that flooded the streets of Zagreb and other cities to watch the final – among them, many foreign tourists and football fans who came just to be a part of it – stayed long into the night. The party, of course, was muted but it was still a party, not a wake.

“You made us proud,” Jutarnji list proclaimed on the front cover; “Thank you, heroes! You gave us everything,” said Sportske novosti. But it wasn’t just that – there was a genuine feeling of pride and gratitude among people.

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21. Feeling hot, hot, hot? Tell us your experiences of heat in your city13:53[−]

Temperatures across the globe have broken records – and rising temperatures have serious implications for cities. What’s happening where you live?

Whether summer in your city is present or past, there is a good chance you weathered record-breaking temperatures this year.

A heatwave swept the planet, and it was not simply one hot summer: the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows that all 18 years of the 21st century are among the 19 warmest on record, and 2016 was the warmest year ever. “In 20 years’ time, the [recent] heat ... will no longer be news. It will be routine,” warned a Guardian editorial.

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22. Lovebox review – Childish Gambino leads diverse corrective to Trump visit13:52[−]

Gunnersbury Park, London
While SZA was delayed by the Trump protests, other artists were energised – including Childish Gambino, who scaled up his music to unprecedented size

The Trump visit – and subsequent protests – coinciding with Lovebox affected the festival in more ways than one. Besides SZA’s highly anticipated set being cut after just four songs, reportedly due to a late arrival because of the protests, the political events also inspired an air of resistance. From those donning anti-Trump protest gear to a rhetoric of encouragement among performers, including Childish Gambino who was “ proud to see that big balloon”, a resounding optimism permeates Gunnersbury Park. The diversity of talented voices across the weekend, particularly given the festival’s notable US weighting, served as perfect opposition to political uncertainty arising here in the UK and across the Atlantic.

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23. Anthony Joshua will defend world titles against Alexander Povetkin at Wembley13:42[−]
  • Joshua takes on WBA mandatory challenger on 22 September
  • Povetkin confirmed after talks with Deontay Wilder stalled

Anthony Joshua will defend his WBA, WBO and IBF heavyweight titles against Alexander Povetkin at Wembley on 22 September, his promoter Eddie Hearn has announced.

Russia’s Povetkin is the mandatory challenger to his WBA title, and by fighting him Joshua should secure greater freedom in selecting his next opponent.

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24. British cave diver considering legal action over Elon Musk's 'pedo' attack13:17[−]

Vernon Unsworth ‘astonished and very angry’ after Tesla owner makes baseless remark

A British cave diver who was instrumental in the rescue of 12 children trapped in a northern Thailand cave says he is considering legal action after the inventor Elon Musk called him a “pedo” on Twitter.

Vernon Unsworth told the Guardian on Monday he was “astonished and very angry” at the attack, for which Musk offered no evidence or basis. The billionaire initially doubled down on the comments made on social media, but has since deleted them.

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25. From Fortnite to Love Island: how the ‘fight to the death’ defines our times13:09[−]

From books and films to TV shows and video games, the last-man-standing trope is massively popular. Is it a reflection of our dog-eat-dog free-market ideology?

You are dropped on to a remote island with only your wits. You are going to have to scavenge weapons, ammunition, first-aid kits and the like, while 99 other people do the same. And then, at some point, the shooting will start, because this is a contest of elimination. As the old Highlander movies had it, there can be only one. The last person left alive wins the game. Welcome to the battle royale.

Such is the basic idea behind the staggeringly popular “Battle Royale” version of the world-beating video game Fortnite, which has 40m players logging in every month, and grossed $223m in March of this year alone. Its success has inspired a slew of other battle-royale games, including a mode in the forthcoming instalment of the juggernaut Call of Duty franchise. A fight to the death among many contestants, until one victor emerges, is also the setup of the Hunger Games trilogy of books and films (from 2008), in which 24 young people from the poverty-stricken Districts are selected every year as “tributes”, to participate in an obsessively televised fight to the death, for the enjoyment of the decadent inhabitants of the Capitol.

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26. On Brexit, EU institutions are leagues ahead of their UK counterparts | Dermot Hodson and John Peterson13:04[−]
It’s a huge challenge for all involved, but where the EU has expertise and cohesion, Britain has confusion and disarray

Before British voters went to the polls in June 2016, the institutions of the European Union were dismissed as “sclerotic, over-centralised and undemocratic”. Those same EU institutions are now portrayed as running rings around British negotiators. Here we find another – among many – of Brexit’s paradoxes.

This state of affairs stems from popular misunderstanding in the UK, as well as elsewhere, of how EU institutions actually work. It also reflects the fact that Brexit is a challenge to which EU institutions are better suited than their British counterparts. The loss of two senior ministers just days after the cabinet agreed on a new negotiating position makes British political institutions’ deficiencies all too clear.

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27. My IVF life: the fake ass, the trigger shot and how I decided to get pregnant13:00[−]

In this new column, Jean Hannah Edelstein starts the complicated journey to conceive using in-vitro fertilization – and takes readers with her

Don’t make jokes, I say to E.

We pause outside the hospital classroom. It’s 9.30am on a sunny morning in Manhattan and we’re about to enter a roomful of people who are here for an introduction to IVF treatment.

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28. What it’s like when Ice detains you: 'They own you. You're impotent'13:00[−]

I spent 11 months in US immigration detention. Here’s what happened

It was a regular Sunday when they arrested me. I’d just gotten paid – back then I was working in the fields, picking grapes – and the kids decided they wanted to go to IHOP for breakfast.

We got in the car and my oldest daughter, Jennifer, was driving and joking around, and we were all laughing. She was just being so silly. We got to the restaurant, the little ones ordered pancakes, and Jennifer and I had omelettes. We finished and got back in the car.

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29. Tributes paid to amateur rugby player who died mid-match12:47[−]

Max Blakeley, 32, was playing for Bradford-based Birkenshaw Bluedogs when he fell ill

Tributes have been paid to a popular amateur rugby player who died after collapsing during a match on Saturday.

Max Blakeley, 32, was playing for the Bradford-based club Birkenshaw Bluedogs in a match at Heworth near York when he became unwell.

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30. 'I nearly died': Richard Bacon pays tribute to NHS after health ordeal12:40[−]

Presenter says he thought at one point ‘this is it’ after falling ill with double chest infection

Richard Bacon has said he thought his life was about to end and paid tribute to the NHS after waking from a medically induced coma.

The television and radio presenter was taken to hospital 11 days ago after falling ill on a flight to Britain from the US. He said on Monday that the condition, initially diagnosed as pneumonia in both lungs, was now being treated as an unidentified double chest infection.

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31. Gone in 40 seconds: what did the Doctor Who trailer tell us?12:05[−]

Bradley Walsh reading the Beano, Alan Shearer talking about football, pizzas mysteriously reanimating – the quick-fire Who trailer wasn’t long but it did give us something to chew on

It’s been BBC convention for a while now to give away big Doctor Who news in the middle of massive sporting events. Pearl Mackie’s casting announcement as Bill was revealed in the middle of the Euro 2016 final and Jodie Whittaker’s unveiling came at the climax of last year’s Wimbledon. So it’s great to see that Auntie still has enough faith in its biggest property to give the same platform to the new era of Doctor Who, with a brand new trailer shown halfway through the World Cup final. And yet I feel undernourished?

Just about the only thing we can be totally sure of is that this new gang of the Doctor’s “friends” – as the publicity material carefully puts it (no longer “companions”, certainly not the reductive “assistants”) - don’t have very healthy diets. Doctor Thirteen will lead a somewhat crowded Tardis of four made up of: near-national cheeky chappie treasure Bradley Walsh neglecting The Chase as Graham, and talented Hollyoaks alumni Mandip Gill as Yasmin and Tosin Cole as Ryan.

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32. The rise of Tierra Whack: 'One day I’ll make a rap song, the next a pop song'12:00[−]

The musician, who’s been drawing praise from Solange Knowles and Flying Lotus, talks about refusing to be hemmed in by definitions

“Crack kills, if it don’t get ya Whack will!” Tierra Whack was leading an outdoor crowd in a chant, and despite her quick-paced rapping and the hot temperatures on a summer Saturday evening, people were keeping up. The Philadelphia artist and musician was playing a set midway through Warm Up – an ongoing weekend concert series at MoMA PS1, the Queens offshoot of the New York art museum – with an unfalteringly high level of energy. Whack urged the crowd to keep repeating the refrain before, during and after her song – which has the same chorus – remarking approvingly at the end: “I really like that song.”

Related: 50 great tracks for July from Drake, Ebony Bones, Low and more

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33. Athletics needs boost in post-Bolt era but was World Cup the answer? | Sean Ingle12:00[−]

The competition was enjoyed by casual fans but track and field still feels like it’s fumbling in the dark since losing star attraction

Just under a year ago in London Usain Bolt grabbed the relay baton for the final time in his career, swapped it from his left hand to right and then pressed down hard on the afterburners. First he soared. Then he hopped before, as the pain from a torn hamstring hit, dropping to his knees.

It could have been a metaphor for the next 11 months of the sport: the thrill of the 2017 world championships, with its stadiums packed and 10 million watching Bolt’s and Mo Farah’s farewell, replaced by a slowing down and indifference from casual observers.

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34. Talking Horses: George Scott trio among top tips for Monday's racing11:59[−]

Concierge, Advanced Virgo and Strawberry Jack could all go well among Monday’s racing action

The Newmarket trainer George Scott has a fine recent strike rate: two wins and a second from his last five runners in the past fortnight. He could well keep up that momentum on Monday, when three runners represent his Saffron Stables.

Scott believes that all three will run well – but is naturally cautious of predicting victories.

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35. How Tom Cruise made ‘going rogue’ a Hollywood staple11:59[−]

From Mission: Impossible to Red Sparrow, do we need rule-busting rebels on screen when there are so many in reality?

If you can remember the plots of the previous five Mission: Impossible movies, you are either some kind of movie savant or you’re Tom Cruise. But if you had to guess any of them, including the forthcoming Mission: Impossible – Fallout, you could safely say either: “Tom Cruise goes rogue”, “Tom Cruise goes after someone who’s gone rogue”, or possibly “Who cares? Remember those awesome stunts!”

And, basically, you’d be right. The previous instalment featured all three: it had a secret spy project that had gone rogue. To infiltrate it, Cruise’s Ethan Hunt had to go even roguer (and hang on to the outside of a plane). In case you’d forgotten, it was called Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, although that could be the title for any of them, and many other movies besides.

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36. World Cup final TV battle: BBC goes for goosebumps as ITV pitches to fans | Paul MacInnes11:59[−]

Neither channel got its World Cup final coverage exactly right but each provided a unique perspective on the same event

It is a job few broadcasters can manage, persuading people to follow you to BBC Two for the tennis while at the same time convincing them to not to go to ITV for the football. Thankfully Sue Barker was there to strike the balance on Sunday afternoon as Wimbledon was superseded by the World Cup final on BBC One. “On this super sporting Sunday you have the best seat in the house,” she purred, “and best choice available of two world-class finals.” Perfectly judged. Let the game begin.

Underneath France v Croatia was another contest, one which occurs only once every two years: BBC against ITV for the nation’s sporting eyeballs. Neither channel gets much experience of live football during the regular season. Only at international tournaments are they able to trawl the world for pundits, craft together poignant video packages and polish those short phrases that linger in the memory. The final is where the two face off against each other, vying for our validation.

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37. Wimbledon cleaning staff 'take food from bins due to low pay'11:47[−]

Housekeepers claim club provides insufficient money for food during their shifts

Cleaning staff at Wimbledon claim they were forced to take food from bins because they were given insufficient money by the All England Lawn Tennis Club (AELTC) to buy lunch and dinner while working.

The staff said they also had to crouch in corridors during their breaks, due to a lack of official break areas and insufficient time for breaks during the tournament, which finished on Sunday.

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38. Two tarantulas may be on loose after babies found in Derbyshire car park11:40[−]

Baby spiders were abandoned in pots and RSPCA says witness saw parents scuttling away

Two tarantulas may be on the loose in a village after three of their babies were found abandoned in a car park.

The RSPCA said it had rescued the baby Brazilian bird-eating spiders after they were found discarded in pots in Derbyshire.

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39. Nearly 300 crocodiles killed in Indonesia after man's death10:37[−]

West Papua official says locals slaughtered 292 crocodiles using hammers and clubs

People armed with knives, hammers and clubs have slaughtered 292 crocodiles after a man was killed by one of the reptiles at a breeding farm in West Papua, Indonesia.

Photographs released by the Antara news agency showed a large pile of bloodied carcasses in the Sorong district.

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40. Senior executives face clampdown on selling share awards10:28[−]

New corporate governance rules will also let companies withhold pay if necessary

Senior executives will face restrictions on when they can sell shares awarded under long-term incentive schemes, according to new corporate governance rules unveiled on Monday.

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) said: “Share awards granted for this purpose should be released for sale on a phased basis and be subject to a total vesting and holding period of five years or more. [Remuneration schemes should] also include provisions that would enable the company to recover and/or withhold sums or share awards and specify the circumstances in which it would be appropriate to do so.”

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41. Why I took my eight-year-old daughter on an anti-Trump protest | Rebecca Schiller10:00[−]

The world is not perfect, and our voices have power. Part of my job is to ensure my children understand that

On Friday my eight-year-old marched alongside me carrying a banner we had made in our garden that morning. It explains, in her words (“human rights not border fights”), why we are missing school and work to protest against Donald Trump’s visit to the UK.

Children protesting alongside their parents for practical and ideological reasons is not a new concept – particularly for women, who remain more likely to have caring responsibilities that force them to choose between activism and childcare unless they combine the two. There were hundreds of families on the marches this weekend and every young body there brought certainty that the fight against people such as Trump will go on beyond my generation.

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42. Archaeologists and astronomers solve the mystery of Chile's Stonehenge10:00[−]

A solar phenomenon found above mysterious pillars, or saywas, was likely designed to broadcast the ‘sacred power’ of the Inca

Growing up on the edge of the Atacama desert in northern Chile, Jimena Cruz was often made to feel ashamed of her indigenous identity.

Related: Stargazing in Chile: dark skies in the Atacama desert

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43. I loathe my body and feel nothing during sex10:00[−]

I lost my virginity at 27 and not in a good way. Now I have huge trust issues, and my efforts to fix my problems have just made things worse

In a nutshell, I loathe my body. I feel nothing during sex or dissociate entirely – I’ll sometimes even feel a void, an emptiness where a feeling or sensation should be. I lost my virginity at 27 and not in a good way. My difficulty reading body language complicates things enormously and I’ve a basket-load of trust issues. I’ve tried guides to fixing such problems but trying to follow them made things a lot worse. I’m well into middle age with almost no experience – yet older men are supposedly attractive with wisdom, confidence and stability that I totally lack.

Dissociation is an important symptom. I suspect that your words “not in a good way” represent a vast understatement, and it is really important to address that issue as a priority. People sometimes enter dissociative states as a coping mechanism to avoid the pain of trauma or to exit an unbearable situation. However, “disappearing” in this way will not help you to heal, and healing is a necessary precursor to enjoying sex in the way you want.

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44. Patrick Reed heads for the Open: 'I feel like I can win every week'10:00[−]

Masters champion believes, having won a first major, he is now ready to go for the career slam and next on his list is The Open

Four years have passed since Patrick Reed, giddy with excitement following a World Golf Championship success in Florida, declared himself a world top-five golfer. Oh, how they laughed. Who does he think he is?

In April, Reed delivered on that promise in emphatic style. Rory McIlroy was among those who could not keep pace with the Texan as he marched towards Masters glory. “The best thing about that is I get to go back every year now,” says Reed. “When I am 70 years old, I’ll be able to have my grandchildren caddie for me in the par-three contest.”

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45. Harrowing video footage shows death in custody of Aboriginal man09:46[−]

David Dungay died after telling five Australian police officers that he could not breathe while being restrained

Shocking video footage of the death in custody of an Indigenous Australian man has been aired in court for the first time, depicting five officers restraining a man who said 12 times that he could not breathe.

David Dungay Jr died in 2016 while he was being held down by officers in a Sydney jail.

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46. War-torn Sarajevo’s camera kids, then and now – a photo essay09:15[−]

In 1997 photographer Chris Leslie taught basic camera techniques at Sarajevo’s Bjelave orphanage and sent the children off to capture their city. This year he returned to see how their lives had unfolded

The children confined to Bjelave orphanage had suffered terribly – both because of the war, and from neglect and abuse. One journalist described the institution as “the worst place in Sarajevo apart from the morgue”.

It is more than 20 years since I first arrived in Sarajevo in late summer 1996. The destruction in the city was jaw-dropping: rows and rows of broken, bombed-out high-rise flats, shell craters and explosion indents everywhere; libraries, offices, factories all in ruins. This was city-wide destruction – a late-20th-century Dresden or Stalingrad.

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47. Can you solve it? Head-spinning bicycle puzzles09:10[−]

Run your brain through the gears

Bonjour guzzleurs,

As we are almost midway through the Tour de France, I thought it would be a good moment for some bicycle puzzles.

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48. The Hyde Park Picture House in Leeds – in pictures09:00[−]

The Hyde Park Picture House, the world’s only surviving gas-lit cinema, opened in 1914. The owners of the Grade II-listed building have now been granted planning permission for redevelopment, to improve accessibility, restore the gas lights and ornate plasterwork and incorporate a second screen in the basement

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49. I let myself down in front of the foodie Frankenstein behind the Cronut | Rhik Samadder09:00[−]

New York chef Dominique Ansel has spawned an endless parade of hybrid-food horrors, but he’s still a hero to me

’You are my experiment today. I want to see how you eat it,” says Dominique Ansel. His indefinable French face and soulful eyes are alive with a new game: the What-a-Melon soft-serve I have just been presented with. It’s real fruit, carved to resemble a double-sailed, red-fleshed boat with chocolate seeds, filled with ice-cream. If I bite into it, the ice-cream will shoot out the sides. Using a knife and fork would be ludicrous. Flummoxed, I do nothing, until the ice cream has melted into the punnet, where I scoop it out with a little spoon. It is squalid behaviour and I sense I have let him down.

I don’t fanboy much, but Ansel is the definition of flour power. It has been five years since his New York bakery unleashed the Cronut, his legendary croissant-doughnut with experimental flavours that never repeat, leading to four-block queues outside his tiny kitchen. I believe I am the first person in the UK to attempt making one at home, after his secret recipe was unveiled, but it took three days and ruined my hob. Even more regrettably, the Cronut spawned the horrendous hybrid food trend of the past few years, the greatest hits of which read like a medieval bestiary. Baissants, flagels and donugs (bagels, flatbreads and chicken nuggets thrown together in coalitions of chaos). Sushirrito, the Japanese-Mexican fusion you didn’t know you needed because you didn’t. Burgers with fried ramen patties for buns – what is that? J’accuse, Ansel!

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50. New Brighton revisited – three decades in pictures09:00[−]

A group show brings together for the first time the New Brighton pictures of internationally renowned British photographers Martin Parr, Ken Grant and Tom Wood. Showing in the town from which the pictures stemmed, this exhibition records three decades of New Brighton through the eyes of the photographers as they lived and worked there.

Showing as part of Imagine Wirral and Liverpool Independents Biennial, the exhibition is at The Sailing School, Marine Point, New Brighton, 14 July-25 August

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51. The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela review – one man’s otherworldly patience09:00[−]
Nelson Mandela’s long, thoughtful letters, written during his 27 years in prison, display an unwavering certainty that change would prevail

Nelson Mandela’s letters from prison seem to demand a spoiler alert. We know how this epic turns out – but the uncanny thing about reading this selection of close-written correspondence is the unavoidable sense that its author always knew the ending in advance, too.

Mandela was born a century ago this week. The conviction that his story would make history, that it would have a triumphant last act of truth and reconciliation, hardly ever appears to have faltered within him. Not when the judge sentenced him to life imprisonment at the end of the Rivonia trial in 1964. Not when the door slammed behind him aged 45 as prisoner 466/64 in an 8ft by 7ft cell on Robben Island, his home for 18 years. Not even when, in 1969, his eldest son, Thembi, was killed in a car crash – a tragedy that followed less than a year after the death of Mandela’s mother – and he was refused permission to attend the funeral (just as he had been his mother’s).

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52. 'I punched him so hard he cried': inside the Street Fighter movie09:00[−]

In 1993, writer/director Steven de Souza battled a military coup, an ever-growing cast list and a self-destructing Jean-Claude Van Damme – and came out with a profitable picture

It was the early 1990s and every teenager in the world knew about Street Fighter II. Originally released in the arcades and then on the SNES and Mega Drive consoles, the game featured a cast of weird, semi-magical combatants with names like Ryu, Chun-Li and Guile battling it out for victory in the World Fighting Championship. It was colourful, competitive and ridiculous. It sold 15 million copies.

Realising the cinematic potential of the game’s giant brand, publisher Capcom soon dispatched a retinue of execs to Hollywood. Experienced producer Ed Pressman saw the potential immediately and he knew who to call: Steven De Souza, writer of Die Hard and Commando, and before those, TV hits such as The Hardy Boys, The Six Million Dollar Man and Knight Rider. Steven had impeccable action-entertainment experience, and was even working on an animated series, Cadillacs and Dinosaurs, for which Capcom had produced a tie-in video game. There was, in Hollywood business parlance, synergy.

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53. Employment tribunal hears cases against National Gallery09:00[−]

Group of 27 educators seek recognition as employees rather than freelancers

Art educators who allege they have been sacked by the National Gallery, many after decades of service, are bringing their cases to an employment tribunal in the latest legal row over the gig economy.

A group of 27 artists and art lecturers who worked in the building overlooking Trafalgar Square in London, are claiming unfair dismissal and seeking to be recognised as employees rather than freelancers.

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54. Oil-rich Nigeria outstrips India as country with most people in poverty09:00[−]

Nine out of 10 of the world’s poorest people will live in Africa within 12 years, say experts from Brookings Institution

Nigeria, one of Africa’s two wealthiest economies, has overtaken India as home to the world’s greatest concentration of extreme poverty, amid warnings that the continent will host nine out of 10 of the world’s poorest people within 12 years.

The claim comes as concerns mount that the growth in poverty – and in Africa in particular – is outpacing efforts to eradicate it. It was made in a recent paper for the Brookings Institution thinktank, by three experts associated with the World Poverty Clock – launched in 2017 to track trends in poverty reduction.

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55. Seven ways to improve your balance08:59[−]

Lack of balance is associated with elderly people, but deterioration can start in your 20s. Here’s how to avoid the wobbles

Ageing often leads to a loss of balance, which can result in an increased risk of falls. But, as a report from the Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago shows, a lack of balance has other consequences. “A tendency to lose balance among elderly people often results in an overall reduction in the level of physical activity,” it says, “and to a decreased ability to function satisfactorily in social roles.”

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56. ‘I broke the contract’: how Hannah Gadsby's trauma transformed comedy08:00[−]

In her show Nanette, the Australian standup speaks out about homophobic and sexual violence – the set is now a Netflix sensation. She opens up about shame, rage, her autism diagnosis and the meaning of Louis CK

During the live run of Hannah Gadsby’s standup show, Nanette, she found herself sleeping 15 hours a night, then taking naps during the day. “I got bronchitis in London,” she says. “A tooth wrenched out in Edinburgh. Then I got carbon monoxide poisoning from the flat in New York. I was Googling ‘neurological disorders’, I had the tremors and my speech was slurring. I kept telling people I was really tired, texting them coffin emojis, and they’d say: ‘Of course you are, this show is exhausting.’”

But she doesn’t think you should really suffer for your art. Well, not any more. “I’m against that theory,” she says firmly.

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57. All you wanted to know about nuclear war but were too afraid to ask08:00[−]

The use of a nuclear weapon is now more likely than any time since the cold war, but the probability of humanity being wiped out entirely has diminished

There are nine countries that possess nuclear weapons. Five of these (the US, Russia, the UK, France and China) are members of the official owners club, who made their weapons early and had them legitimised in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) signed in 1968, the key piece of international law governing nuclear weapons possession.

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58. At last, a law that could have stopped Blair and Bush invading Iraq | Geoffrey Robertson08:00[−]

The Hague’s new crime of aggression might give belligerent heads of states a reason to pause

Tuesday is a red-letter day for international law: from then on, political and military leaders who order the invasion of foreign countries will be guilty of the crime of aggression, and may be punishable at the international criminal court in The Hague. Had this been an offence back in 2003, Tony Blair would have been bang to rights, together with senior numbers of his cabinet and some British military commanders. But if that were the case, of course, they would not have gone ahead; George W Bush would have been without his willing UK accomplices.

The judgment at Nuremberg declared that “to initiate a war of aggression … is the supreme international crime”. But this concept never entered UK law (as the misguided crowdfunded effort to prosecute Blair discovered last year). International acceptance of it stalled until states could agree on an up-to-date definition. The crime was included in the ICC jurisdiction back in 1998, but was suspended until its elements could be decided (in 2010) then ratified by at least 30 states (in 2016). At last it is finally being “activated”. In the meantime, Iraq and Ukraine have been invaded and other countries threatened, while Donald Trump attacked Syria last year. Now, the very existence of the crime of aggression offers some prospect of deterrence, and some degree of certainty in identifying the criminals.

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59. Widowed father ordered to leave UK against advice of Home Office's own lawyers08:00[−]

Andrew Farotade refused leave to remain under rules intended to tackle terrorism

A widower who is the sole carer of his four-year-old son has been forbidden to work and ordered to leave the country – even though the Home Office’s own lawyers advised them to drop the case.

Andrew Farotade, who is from Nigeria, won a ?1,500 scholarship in 2009 to study his second master’s degree in engineering at the Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen. He then worked for the Security Industry Authority in jobs in which he was responsible for the security of highly valuable, hi-tech equipment and intellectual assets worth millions of pounds.

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60. Ancient tales are back in fashion – for telling it like it is | Claire Armitstead08:00[−]

Fairytale and myth can hold a mirror to our troubled times – as evidenced by the refugees walking the Canterbury Tales route

As military helicopters buzzed overhead on their practice manoeuvres for Donald Trump’s visit last week, 120 secular pilgrims straggled through some of the UK’s most ancient woodland. Now in its fourth year, the five-day Refugee Tales walk is both a political statement and a healing ritual for survivors of the infernal limbo of indefinite detention for the “crime” of being unwanted immigrants.

Its template is Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: in the day, you walk; in the evening, you eat, drink and make merry. Above all, you tell stories. This year’s included The Social Worker’s Tale and The Erased Person’s Tale. As most of the refugees are too frightened or traumatised to tell their own stories, writers are brought in to do it for them. The erased person was represented by a rabbi, Jonathan Wittenberg, whose own family came to the UK as refugees, and who spoke chillingly of the “bureaucratic erasure” now practised in what were once regarded as “islands of refuge”.

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61. Labour antisemitism code could breach Equality Act08:00[−]

Legal advice prepared by law lecturer states party has ignored Macpherson principle

Labour has been warned that its antisemitism definition could breach the Equality Act, as the party battles to contain the fall-out with Jewish members over its new code of conduct.

The Jewish Labour Movement (JLM) will hand the party new legal advice, ahead of a crunch meeting on Tuesday, which advises that the party’s decision to exclude some examples from an international antisemitism definition breaches the 2010 act.

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62. Mexico's president-elect Amlo to take 60% pay cut in austerity push07:28[−]

Andr?s Manuel L?pez Obrador will earn 108,000 pesos ($5,707) a month and says no public official will earn more than the president in his term

Mexican president-elect Andr?s Manuel L?pez Obrador has said he plans to earn less than half of what his predecessor made when he takes office in December as part of an austerity push in government.

“What we want is for the budget to reach everybody,” he told reporters in front of his campaign headquarters.

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63. Thai cave rescue boys mourn after hearing that diver died04:04[−]

Saman Kunan hailed as hero but boys only told about his death on Saturday after doctors determined they were strong enough

The 12 boys and their coach rescued from a Thai cave have mourned an ex-Navy Seal who died while taking part in the mission, the health ministry has said.

The Wild Boars football team are recovering in hospital following 18 days spent inside the Tham Luang cave after entering on 23 June and getting trapped by monsoon floodwaters.

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64. Russia must ‘account for role’ in shooting down MH17, says G702:07[−]

Statement comes on eve of summit between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin and just before anniversary of 17 July 2014 air disaster

Russia must “account for its role” in the 2014 downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 over Ukraine and cooperate with efforts to establish truth and justice, foreign ministers of the world’s industrial democracies said on Sunday.

The statement by the G7 ministers came on the eve of a summit between US President Donald Trump and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin, but also just before the anniversary of the 17 July 2014 air disaster which killed all 298 crew and passengers when the airliner was shot down.

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65. Tudor shipwreck discovered by local group on Kent beach02:01[−]

The government has listed the vessel as the only wreck of its kind in south-east England

A Tudor shipwreck, discovered by members of a local history group surveying Tankerton beach, near Whitstable, in Kent for second world war pillboxes, has been given official protection by the government as the only wreck of its kind in south-east England.

Another ship believed to date from the 19th century, gradually being exposed at low tides at Camber Sands near Rye harbour in East Sussex, is also being listed.

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66. Sharp rise in number of super-rich prepared to invest ?2m for UK visa02:01[−]

Applications for ‘golden visa’ increase by 46% in year despite government crackdown

There has been a 46% increase in the number of the global super-rich prepared to invest ?2m for the privilege of living and working in the UK despite Theresa May’s ordering a crackdown on a wealthy visa scheme to root out “illicit and corrupt” money flowing into the UK.

More than 400 very wealthy overseas investors applied for tier 1 investor visas in the year to 31 March, a 46% increase on the number of applicants in the previous 12 months. The tier 1 investor scheme, widely described as the “golden visa”, allows visitors to stay in the UK for 40 months if they invest more than ?2m in the UK economy.

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67. Hong Kong's Snowden refugees, facing deportation, hope of new life in Canada02:00[−]

The seven men and women who sheltered the whistleblower in 2013 are awaiting the result of their final appeal


For the past few years, Supun Kellapatha and his wife Nadeeka Dilrukshi, Sri Lankan asylum seekers in Hong Kong, have tried to make themselves invisible. They go out as little as possible and hardly socialise. He sometimes takes their children, a two-year-old boy and six-year old girl, to the cinema but only when fewer people will see them.

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68. I'm 65 and my interest-only mortgage is ending – what can I do?02:00[−]

I still owe ?112,000 and I want to stay in my house, not sell up to pay it off

Q I’m 65 and single and still work part time earning ?23,000 a year (?1,560 monthly) on top of my private pension of ?550 and state pension of ?700 (both monthly). My interest-only mortgage will come to an end in November 2019 and I will still owe ?112,000. The house is worth ?190,000 and I want to stay in it. What are my options? PH

A Until relatively recently, because of your age, if you didn’t have the money needed to pay off your interest-only mortgage at the end of its term, your choice would have been between selling up and downsizing or taking out an equity release plan to raise the cash needed to pay off the mortgage. Those options are still available to you, but as a result of the relaxation of the rules about the sale of interest-only mortgages by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), there has been a growing number of specialist “later life” lenders offering both interest-only and repayment mortgages to older borrowers excluded by mainstream lenders because of their age. So if your current lender won’t let you extend your mortgage, there is likely to be a specialist lender who will let you take out a conventional residential mortgage provided you meet its affordability requirements.

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69. France lift the trophy as Russia 2018 ends on a high – World Cup Football Daily01:38[−]

Max and co discuss France’s World Cup final triumph over Croatia, another penalty, another controversial VAR incident, the tournament’s highs and lows and players taking shots to the conkers

  • If you think this podcast is worth something, then you can support The Guardian from as little as ?1. It only takes a minute - go to gu.com/fw

Rate, review, share on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud, Acast and Stitcher, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email.

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Paolo Bandini and Andy Brassell to look back at a World Cup final in which France took the trophy, beating Croatia 4-2. We dial up Philippe Auclair, who’s not as sober as he was at the start of the final, but not as drunk as he’ll be by the time you listen to this.

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70. Paris celebrates World Cup win as one million fans fill Champs-?lys?es01:29[−]

Supporters with tears in their eyes express ‘total love’ for young, diverse French squad

Tens of thousands of supporters wrapped in red, white and blue flags and singing the French national anthem have poured on to the Champs-?lys?es in Paris to celebrate France’s World Cup victory over Croatia, cheering that the nation was now firmly a football superpower.

As the final whistle blew, shouts rang out and vast crowds that had gathered outside local bars began sprinting on to the 1.2 mile (2km) avenue in the centre of Paris.

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71. Harry Kane talks of pride as he is confirmed Golden Boot winner00:30[−]

• Kane: ‘There is still stuff I can improve on’
• John Stones: ‘We set a lot of markers and should be proud’

Harry Kane says he has now proved he can perform on every major stage in football after winning the World Cup Golden Boot. The 24-year-old scored six goals at Russia 2018, holding off competition from Belgium’s Romelu Lukaku and France’s Kylian Mbapp? among others to win the trophy.

Related: Golden Boot standings: top scorers for Russia World Cup 2018

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72. Firefighters tackle large grass fire in east London00:02[−]

Forty fire engines called to blaze on Wanstead Flats as smoke billows over capital

More than 225 firefighters tackled a large grass fire in east London that sent smoke billowing over the capital throughout Sunday afternoon.

The fire began at around 3pm and was still smouldering at 9pm by which time the flames had been extinguished and firefighters were damping down the scorched earth.

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73. Kylian Mbapp? the top ticket in French collection of bottomless talent | Barney RonayВс., 15 июля[−]
Will, skill and a careful coaching template have forged a side whose sheer youthfulness should frighten the rest of the world

And fade to blue. On a stormy, slightly wild afternoon in Moscow France became world champions for the second time, providing a bookend to one victorious era and offering a seductive hint of another to come.

It seemed fitting that victory here was never really in doubt. This despite the attentions of a manically committed Croatia who seemed to be charging after something that just kept moving away, engine purring, geared to a higher rate of frequency.

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74. Who is America? Sacha Baron Cohen's new show aims high but goes lowВс., 15 июля[−]

The first episode of the comedian’s much-hyped new series has one moment of viral gold but is mostly a frustrating experience

Somewhere around the bit in which Sacha Baron Cohen recalls being cuckolded by a dolphin while on vacation with his (human) wife, a viewer is liable to be hit with a wave of nostalgia. Sitting through the largely tiresome pilot of Baron Cohen’s latest program Who Is America? inspires longing for a simpler past, when Baron Cohen’s profile was still low enough that he didn’t have to mask his face with nightmare-inducing prosthetics just to go incognito. He plays four characters in the first episode of this new series – an obese quack doctor, an NPR-listening uberliberal, a limey ex-con, and a gruff Israeli commando – all of whom evoke fonder memories of sweet Borat, the good-natured traveler in thrall of a “very nice” world full of “great success!” As hardliners on the left and right, gun nuts and bleeding-heart activists, confrontation is baked into the very premise of this new quartet.

Related: Who else might be a victim of Sacha Baron Cohen's new show?

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75. Novak Djokovic’s son inspires revival at Wimbledon after wilderness years | Sean IngleВс., 15 июля[−]

Singles champion fulfils boyhood dream, this time in front of his own child, as he wins his first grand slam in three years

When Novak Djokovic was a young boy in Serbia he spent hours smacking tennis balls against a dilapidated wall until they became bald. On Sunday at Wimbledon , however, he became that wall: blocking, dinking and blunting everything that Kevin Anderson threw at him.

Related: Jamie Murray and Victoria Azarenka miss out in mixed doubles final

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76. Theresa May is teetering. But her fall will not end the crisis | Matthew d’AnconaВс., 15 июля[−]

Though the prime minister has been a profound disappointment, she is only the symptom of a deeper malaise

Theresa May’s expression is hard to read at the best of times, and almost impenetrable at the worst. So it proved on Sunday when she made her second appearance in less than a month on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show. Was the embattled prime minister boldly channelling Marshal Ferdinand Foch during the first Battle of the Marne in 1914: Mon centre c?de, ma droite recule, situation excellente, j’attaque (“My centre is giving way, my right is retreating, situation excellent, I am attacking”)? Or did her delphic mask recall the terror one imagines she felt in her youth when wickedly “running through fields of wheat”?

If May is apprehensive, she is absolutely right to be. Last week was bad enough – two senior cabinet resignations, Donald Trump’s helpful interventions – but this week the legislative substance of Brexit returns to the floor of Commons, in the form of the taxation (cross-border trade) bill and the quite distinct trade bill.

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77. Ben Jennings on the aftermath of Donald Trump's UK visit – cartoonВс., 15 июля[−]
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78. Bodypainting and oil wrestlers: Sunday's best photosВс., 15 июля[−]

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world

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79. Police arrest 25 people in India after latest WhatsApp lynchingВс., 15 июля[−]

Man killed by 2,000-strong mob over child-kidnapping rumours on messaging service

Indian police have arrested 25 people after a man was killed by a mob in the country’s latest lynching over suspicion of child kidnapping sparked by rumours on WhatsApp.

The men were arrested on Sunday over the murder of Mohammad Azam, 27, who was attacked along with two friends by a 2,000-strong mob in southern Karnataka state’s Bidar district late on Friday.

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80. Owen Jones: 'Help us confront injustice' – videoВс., 15 июля[−]

The columnist delivers a message from the anti-Trump protests in London. He says the Guardian exists to challenge the status quo and invites readers to help it maintain editorial independence to ensure that those at the top will continue to be challenged


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81. The big picture: football at home in Park Hill, Sheffield, 1961Вс., 15 июля[−]
Roger Mayne captures a kickabout in the shadow of the steel city’s brutalist estate

If football had come home this weekend, there is a strong argument that it would have pitched up in Sheffield. Three of England’s team grew up in the steel city. Visitors to the S1 Artspace, which reopens in the city’s Park Hill housing estate this month will perhaps see an added poignancy in some of the images on display there.

Park Hill was built a few years before England’s only triumph in the World Cup. Along with the neighbouring Hyde Park estate, it represented city council architect JL Womersley’s bold vision of a new era of social housing in Sheffield. The street photographer Roger Mayne documented all of that original hope in his photographs of the first residents of the utopian schemes that followed slum clearance. His camera often dwelt on the common recreation areas of the new brutalist buildings, where invariably an impromptu game of football was in progress.

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82. Blooming lovely: this summers bold florals – in picturesВс., 15 июля[−]

Florals are getting bolder. Wear them in layers of clashing colours, on swimwear and dresses teamed with trainers. This summer is all about petal power

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83. From drag queens to rappers: up close with the UK's anti-Trump protesters - videoСб., 14 июля[−]

The Guardian spends the day getting to know the people Donald Trump tried to avoid during his visit to the UK. More than 100,000 people travelled to London from around the country to protest against the US president, according to the organisers of the two marches that converged on Trafalgar Square

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84. Seven great audiobooks for car trips great and smallПт., 13 июля[−]

It’s not easy to figure out what you feel like listening to at the best of times, but choosing the right audiobook for a journey is fraught with even more variables. We’ve taken some of the pain out of it for you with seven suggested listens

Long car journeys used to be dead zones for your brain. After a while, most radio stations become repetitive and conversations drop off – unless you’re travelling with children, in which case the constant audio loop of “are we there yet” adds an extra level of torture to the experience. Even if you’re a passenger, reading or fiddling with your phone often just makes you feel tired or carsick.

But all that is changing. Every week more and more audiobooks, audiodramas and podcasts are becoming available and road trips are being transformed. “My seven-year-old gets carsick – and then really panicky about throwing up – so she can’t watch the iPad,” says parenting blogger Jacqui Paterson. “I load up audiobooks to keep her occupied on long car journeys and it helps ease her panic too.”

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85. Returning a pro tennis serve: just don't watch the ball – videoПт., 13 июля[−]

Keeping your eye on the ball is one of the first pieces of sporting advice we are all given, which seems pretty sensible when facing an object potentially moving at 100 mph plus. But, is it even possible? The average male tennis pro has a serve of around 125mph which, travelling over 75ft, means it's almost impossible to return if you're watching the ball. So here's how it's done

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86. Syrian refugee stuck in a Malaysian airport for four months: 'I can feel my breaking point' – videoЧт., 12 июля[−]

Syrian refugee Hassan al-Kontar has been stuck in Kuala Lumpur international airport for more than four months. He was refused a new passport by the Syrian embassy in the United Arab Emirates, where he was working when the war broke out in his homeland. After being forced to leave the UAE, he went to Malaysia, where he is now unable to leave the arrivals lounge.

Kontar says his only hope is a campaign to grant him asylum in Canada and though he wants his situation to be resolved as soon as possible, he says he is not unique and Syrians fleeing the war have been failed by the international community

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87. How advert showing women shaving actual body hair broke taboos – videoСр., 11 июля[−]

Ever wonder why women shown shaving on TV adverts are already completely hairless? Breaking with decades of tradition, Billie, a US razor company, depicts women actually removing their body hair. Perhaps a sign of brands responding to calls for more realistic portrayals of femininity, say experts

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88. The slice of LGBTQ+ history I found in my mate's loft – videoСб., 07 июля[−]

Gavin McGregor was rummaging around in his friend's attic when he stumbled across a treasure trove of LGBTQ+ campaign material from the 1980s – a pivotal time in the fight for equality. In the run-up to London Pride he picks his favourites from the collection and says it should serve as a reminder of the bravery of activists from the time

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89. Pedallers’ pilgrimage: Britain's best cycling routesПт., 06 июля[−]

Wild Cycling author Chris Sidwells shares nine of his favourite rides – from the rugged west Highlands of Scotland to the green and pleasant loops of the home counties

These rides are my choices based on a wide variety of cycling experiences. Don’t consider the routes prescriptive – they are merely an introduction to the possibilities for cycling in different parts of the UK. Use them as a basis for your own exploration of nine parts of the country, each offering a unique day’s cycling.

Full English: the Chiltern Hills, Buckinghamshire
Distance: 37 miles
Difficulty: 6/10
Start and finish: Princes Risborough
Nearest station: Princes Risborough

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90. Billy Caldwell's mother: ‘Medical cannabis keeps my epileptic son alive’ – videoЧт., 05 июля[−]

When 12-year-old Billy Caldwell's medicinal cannabis was confiscated by British border forces last month, his life-threatening seizures returned almost immediately. His case sparked a fierce debate and access to his medicine hangs in the balance. In an exclusive interview, his mother, Charlotte, calls for urgent changes to UK drug laws

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91. After you: the psychology of queues and how to beat them - video explainerЧт., 05 июля[−]

Queues are simple: you join at the back and wait your turn. But there's a whole branch of psychology devoted to studying how they work. Wimbledon publishes a guidebook on how to queue and major brands are obsessed with stopping you leaving to go elsewhere. The Guardian's science editor, Ian Sample, explains

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92. Head for the hills: Colorado's top adventuresПт., 29 июня[−]

The staggering natural beauty of the state of Colorado is right on Denver’s doorstep, giving the city a connection to the outdoors like no other in the US. Intrepid traveller Aaron Millar shares his favourite adventure spots

For outdoor lovers, Colorado is the stuff of legends. In winter, 750cm of pure white powder blankets the jagged peaks of the Rockies, producing 12,000 skiable hectares (29,640 acres) and 1,883 perfect runs. But the fun doesn’t stop when the snow melts. In summer, the mountains spring to life with wild flowers and high-altitude hiking and biking; rodeos come to town; there’s climbing and fresh farm-to-table food.

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93. If you value the Guardian's World Cup coverage, we'd love you to support itЧт., 14 июня[−]

Our senior sports writer Barney Ronay explains how you can help keep the Guardian’s football coverage in play

Support the Guardian

Here we are then. Russia 2018 is already well under way: another impossibly exciting, complex, wild-looking Fifa World Cup. And in its shadow, here we are too.

Welcome to another mob-handed, obsessively planned, lovingly curated effort to bring you the Guardian and Observer’s World Cup coverage in every conceivable form, to your every conceivable screen.

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94. ‘I had to memorise more than 2,000 ingredients’: how a perfumer mastered her artСр., 02 мая[−]

A fascination with smell and a background in chemistry meant that Ruth Mastenbroek was a natural for perfumery. Here, she explains how olfactory experiences and the ability to mix ingredients and think laterally are all part of the scent-making journey

Success as a perfumer requires an innate sensitivity to smell, but determination and perseverance is what turns that natural talent into a career. I was always pretty pernickety about smell and what I did and didn’t like, but it was only when I was 21 that I discovered perfumery.

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