Politics | The Guardian17:35 Текст источника в новой вкладке
Latest Politics news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice
Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2017

 
 
1. IFS says budget shows UK 'in danger of losing two decades of earnings growth' - Politics live17:28[−]

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including reaction to the budget, Philip Hammond’s morning interviews and the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ post-budget briefing.

And if all this economic news is so gloomy you feel tempted to get sloshed, even that gets covered by the IFS briefing. They’ve got tips on tax-efficient drinking ...

This is how we tax alcohol. Lovely chart. Crazy tax system. pic.twitter.com/WGNmpAZSxm

Cider, by the way, remains the most tax efficient route to oblivion https://t.co/FMAul6q7ao

The IFS has been tweeting some of the charts from the presentations on its Twitter feed.

Here are some of the most striking ones.

Slowdown in productivity is a global problem but OBR expects UK to perform worse than main competitors #Budget2017 pic.twitter.com/oHy6Rs4Ybn

Forecast for earnings in early 2020s still to be well below 2008 levels. Extraordinary. Forecasts earnings down by more than ?1,400 since March 2016. pic.twitter.com/galVH4Wu7x

Boost to NHS spending and on course to meet manifesto commitment but still tough times for the NHS @TheIFS #Budget2017 pic.twitter.com/QnLVn4wPwZ

Context for housing measures: plummeting rates of home ownership among young adults across successive generations #Budget2017 pic.twitter.com/KZYHZgGMM1

300,000 target for new dwellings - this is high by historial standards pic.twitter.com/qj0b99BS0p

Roll-out of Universal Credit being delayed again #Budget2017 pic.twitter.com/whB6aYCvwf

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2. Philip Hammond pledges driverless cars by 2021 and warns people to retrain17:11[−]

UK chancellor says driverless vehicles will revolutionise people’s lives but says for some it will be ‘very challenging’

The chancellor has warned that a million British workers will need to retrain with the driverless cars set to revolutionise the workplace and people’s lives.

Philip Hammond reaffirmed a budget pledge to ensure “ genuine driverless vehicles” on Britain’s roads by 2021 – and said people should be prepared for it to be “very challenging”.

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3. Labour criticises delays to universal credit reforms17:04[−]

Changes announced in budget will not be introduced until as late as April, leaving some families facing a tough Christmas

Opposition parties and charities have criticised budget measures to improve the rollout of universal credit after it emerged that the changes will not be introduced until as late as April.

In his budget speech, Philip Hammond announced a ?1.5bn fund to assist people moving to UC, promising a reduction of the six-week initial wait to five, easier access to initial loans and a two-week bridging system for housing benefit.

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4. Labour suspends ex-minister Ivan Lewis over sexual harassment claim16:30[−]

Party suspends MP for Bury South after woman alleged he touched her leg and invited her to his house in 2010, when she was 19

Labour has suspended the former minister Ivan Lewis over allegations of sexual harassment.

The party’s decision means the MP for Bury South, who was placed under investigation last week, will sit as an independent MP in the House of Commons.

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5. Why is the government waging a war against disabled people? | Peter Beresford16:19[−]

Ministers’ social care and welfare reforms represent a deliberately prejudiced, vicious attack on a significant minority of the population

A recent United Nations report on its inspection into the UK’s record on disabled people’s rights was described as a “17-page-long catalogue of shame” by one commentator, who wrote:

Over the past seven years, cuts to benefits, social care, the legal system and local authority funding have effectively put decades of slow, painful progress into reverse.

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6. Don’t be fooled by the ‘economicky’ words: this budget is all politics | Victoria Waldersee16:03[−]
The dominant school of economics has long marketed itself as value-free. But the chancellor should be honest about the ideological nature of his decisions

You’d think that a leading figure giving their most important speech of the year on what exactly they’re planning on doing with the nation’s money would try to avoid inductive leaps, questionable stats, and a stubborn inability to be open about the fact that their actions are a choice, not a necessity.

But when it’s the budget, and your job title is chancellor of the exchequer, it seems like anything goes. It’s not Philip Hammond’s fault (though given he uses “ too many technical words” by his own admission, he’s probably not helping); I’m not sure there’s ever been a time where the budget felt like an honest, open, high-quality discussion on how our collective tax money is going to be spent. Isn’t that a little strange?

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7. London mayor to draw up charter regulating pseudo-public space15:02[−]

Sadiq Khan will set out responsibilities for owners of public spaces after Guardian investigation which uncovered growing corporate control of parks and squares

The mayor of London will draw up a new charter regulating the management of privately owned public spaces, following a Guardian Cities investigation which uncovered growing corporate control over parks and squares in the capital.

The announcement comes as Sadiq Khan prepares to publish the first draft of his London Plan – the document that sets out the mayor’s strategic vision for London, and shapes development and planning policies across all of the city’s local authorities.

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8. Corbyn has seen the light on Brexit. Now he’s taking the fight to the Tories | Polly Toynbee14:52[−]
The Labour leader finally grasps what leaving the EU really means: the greatest harm inflicted on the very people his party cares about the most

At last, Labour steps up. Brexit is the great national crisis of our times and yet the leaders of the opposition have sometimes seemed so muted it has driven remainers to tear their hair out in frustration.

That changed yesterday at prime minister’s questions. Jeremy Corbyn for the first time turned all guns on the prime minister over her incoherent, incomprehensible and impossible Brexit stance. He used all his questions, every one, to wallop her exactly where she and her party are most vulnerable – and not before time.

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9. Irish report shows lack of respect in EU for UK's handling of Brexit14:40[−]

Leaked paper says David Davis’s failure to mention Brexit confused French, and Czechs thought Boris Johnson ‘unimpressive’

The near contempt felt by European leaders at the British government’s management of the Brexit negotiations, and their concerns over the “unimpressive” and “surprising” behaviour of Boris Johnson and David Davis, have been revealed by a confidential report drawn up by the Irish government.

The leaked document, from the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs, is based on recent meetings with counterparts in European capitals and paints a damning picture of the diplomatic efforts of senior British politicians.

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10. Brexiteers, remember how the promise of New Labour turned to dust | Richard Power Sayeed13:00[−]
Those expecting a new Britain should look back two decades at the reality of Tony Blair’s seemingly transformative agenda

Twenty years after New Labour’s triumphant electoral victory, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown are still squabbling. But far more important than the competing accounts of when the former agreed to make way for the latter is understanding why the promise of New Labour turned out to be false.

We all remember Tony sipping champagne with Noel. A wall of flowers for a people’s princess. Damien’s shark in the Royal Academy, just a few rooms away from Tracey’s tent. Geri in her Union Jack, proclaiming the rise of girl power. Doreen Lawrence demanding an inquiry for her murdered son. In 1997, these were seen as harbingers of a fairer, more open and more modern Britain. Today, after a decade of crisis, protest, riots, racism and referendums, we know only too well that New Labour and the liberal culture that enveloped it did not create a “new Britain”.

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11. Philip Hammond: stamp duty axe is incentive to save house deposit12:39[−]

Chancellor says criticism that his flagship policy will merely raise house prices overlooks his plan to build more homes

Philip Hammond has defended his flagship housing policy against criticism it will raise house prices and said that abolishing stamp duty for first-time buyers would create an incentive to save a deposit.

The chancellor said the policy, which abolished the stamp duty on homes under ?300,000 for first-time buyers, would help a million people get on the housing ladder.

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12. Labour's extra borrowing would pay for itself, says McDonnell12:15[−]

Shadow chancellor refuses to be pinned down on specific cost of servicing debt from party’s spending plans, accusing BBC presenter of ‘trite journalism’

The shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, has refused to put a figure on the cost of Labour’s plans for extra borrowing and dismissed being challenged on specific numbers as “trite journalism”.

Asked nine times by BBC Radio 4’s Today presenter Mishal Husain how much extra it would cost to service public debt under Labour, McDonnell refused to give a figure. Instead he repeatedly claimed that extra borrowing would “pay for itself”.

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13. How the OBR quickly spoiled Hammond's housing help lines10:00[−]

The new stamp duty threshold doesn’t look so good outside London and as for the ?44bn worth of measures? That’s actually ?15bn ... spread over five years

The excitement over the chancellor’s modest surprise – the abolition of stamp duty for first-time buyers purchasing properties worth up to ?300,000 – lasted about five minutes. The Office for Budget Responsibility quickly pointed out that this supposed giveaway will increase house prices. The winners will be people who already own a house, not those trying to enter the market.

Philip Hammond might counter that first-time buyers, by saving up to ?5,000 in stamp duty, will be able to save more money for a deposit. Yes, but the numbers won’t impress outside London.

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14. Steve Bell’s If ... Philip Hammond in a cloud of uncertainty09:10[−]
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15. Chancellor targets English regions with multibillion investment09:00[−]

Budget aims to tackle London-centric economy by announcing spending plans for areas including the north and Midlands

English regions including the north and the Midlands will receive a multibillion-pound investment in an effort to reduce the weighting of the economy towards London.

Speaking as he announced plans aimed at improving transport links and devolving more power to the regions, Philip Hammond said “far too much of our economic strength is concentrated in our capital city”.

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16. Europe needs a leader. Who will step up if Merkel goes? | Simon Jenkins09:00[−]
The German leader’s departure could bring crisis to the EU. Britain could have helped if it hadn’t jumped ship

Suddenly Brexit matters, a lot. Until recently I had regarded it as one of those crises that we muddle through somehow, like the bank collapse or the winter of discontent. Time is the great compromiser. Project fear would turn out to be project not-quite-as-bad-as-we-thought.

Related: What does Germany’s political crisis mean for Brexit? | Martin Kettle

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17. Higher rate UK taxpayers gain most in budget changes09:00[−]

Rise in personal tax allowance benefits higher ratepayers by ?340 a year with basic rate band ?70 better off and universal credit recipients better by just 50p per week

Higher rate taxpayers will be ?340 a year better off after budget changes to income tax, but lower earners will gain just ?70 and those on universal credit just 50p a week, as the chancellor rejected accusations that the well-off do not pay enough tax.

The personal allowance – that part of your pay not liable for income tax – will go up to ?11,850 from April next year, a ?350 increase from the current level. The rise will help Philip Hammond meet the Conservative election pledge to raise the allowance to ?12,500 by 2020. In practice, it turns into a ?70 saving for a basic rate taxpayer, as it means that ?350 more of their income is not liable to 20% income tax.

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18. UK prospects for growth far weaker than first predicted, says OBR01:00[−]

Forecaster now expects economy to grow by just 1.5% in 2017, rather than 2% originally suggested in March

Britain’s growth prospects are far weaker than previously thought, according to the Office for Budget Responsibility, as stalling productivity and cash-strapped consumers provide a bleak backdrop for the economy.

The government’s independent economic forecaster sharply downgraded its growth predictions and now expects the economy to grow by just 1.5% this year, after predicting 2% growth back in March at the time of the last budget.

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19. Steve Bell on the autumn budget – cartoon00:12[−]
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20. Hammond safe at No 11 after 'clanger-free' budgetСр., 22 нояб.[−]

An optimistic, gaffe-free chancellor offered enough to keep his key to No 11 – at least for now

Just days ago, Philip Hammond was battling for his political life amid television gaffes and pressure from Brexit-supporting MPs who considered him – and the Treasury – way too gloomy about Britain’s prospects after leaving the EU.

As he stood up to deliver a budget that most agreed posed tricky challenges, bookies were taking bets on how long it would be until this chancellor was shunted out of No 11.

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21. Scotland 'shortchanged' by budget's lack of cash for vital services, says SNPСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Boost of ?2bn will not halt drop in funds available for day-to-day spending, claims finance secretary Derek Mackay

Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, faces tougher choices on public spending after the chancellor of the exchequer, Philip Hammond, failed to increase significantly Holyrood’s funding for essential services, adding to pressure for tax rises.

A headline funding boost of ?2bn for Scotland in Hammond’s budget on Wednesday was criticised by the Scottish government, which said it included ?1.1bn in loans that could not be spent on services like health. The total package announced by the chancellor also carried an extra ?509m for conventional infrastructure spending such as building roads, schools and hospitals.

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22. The Guardian view on budget 2017: a missed opportunity | EditorialСр., 22 нояб.[−]
Philip Hammond has admitted that seven years of obsessing about the public sector deficit and shrinking the state has left the economy enfeebled and smaller than before the crisis. But he continues to put ideology above evidence

The last seven years has been an experiment in politics; testing a hypothesis about whether you could cut your way to growth. Philip Hammond’s budget suggests that you cannot. The government’s argument has been that only a programme of rigid deficit reduction and public spending cuts would heal a sick, bloated economy. The damaging consequences of that strategy were laid bare by the Treasury today. Rolling back key public services and declining to invest for the future has meant the economy is smaller than it was forecast to be. Even worse, it has become enfeebled, unable to grow as fast as it historically has done. The result is a poorer, more indebted British state less able to act in the name of economic justice: the higher pay pledged to low-paid workers by the government under the national living wage scheme won’t now materialise when ministers had promised. The UK has experienced almost a lost decade of stagnating wages and shrivelling the state. It is true that Mr Hammond can say that the economy is now recuperating. But the nation has not recovered its pre-crisis vigour. Nor can the chancellor say when, or if, it ever will.

This budget represents a missed opportunity for Mr Hammond to reset the narrative and build up much-needed political capital with his own side by signalling a new direction about where the government is going. What he did in an hour-long speech was to please neither the state-shrinkers on the Conservative backbenches nor those critics who suggest he should fire up growth with the big bazooka of public spending. Instead the chancellor produced a pea shooter: announcing the only post-election giveaway budget since the millennium by borrowing an extra ?14bn over the next five years. More cash for an industrial strategy, infrastructure investment and hi-tech research should be welcomed. As should Mr Hammond’s attempts to tax internet giants, which contrasts with his silence over the recent revelations of offshore tax avoidance.

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23. Hammond’s ‘make-or-break budget’ wasn’t bold – just more of the same | Aditya ChakraborttyСр., 22 нояб.[−]
The chancellor had a choice, an economic stimulus or reprising George Osborne’s austerity. He chose very badly

Philip Hammond is going nowhere – or so he wants you to think. For months, the chancellor has faced a guerrilla campaign from his cabinet colleagues and backbenchers for his sacking and replacement by someone more Brexity, someone more spendy; someone more, well, happy. Wednesday’s budget was his response to all the back-biting and poison briefings. Hence the opening optimism about a Britain “fit for the future”. Hence the jibes at plotter-in-chief Michael Gove and his “economicky” terms. Hence the attempt to craft a budget that told a coherent story about a country with less money but lots of pluck, and a government unveiling the biggest housebuilding programme in a generation. Headline-grabbing policies, personal pugnacity and a tank full of mediocre jokes – these are the classic signs of a chancellor trying his best to reverse out of a dead end.

Related: Help for housing or a kick in the teeth for the young? Our writers on the budget | Matthew d’Ancona, Faiza Shaheen, Jonathan Freedland, Polly Toynbee and Frances Ryan

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24. Budget's ?1.6bn cash boost for NHS less than half of experts’ adviceСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Government warned anything short of extra ?4bn next year would leave service struggling to deliver care

Philip Hammond has bowed to intense pressure to give the NHS more money in Wednesday’s budget, but produced less than half the ?4bn the health service’s own boss said it needed to look after patients properly next year.

A payment of ?1.6bn for the NHS in England in 2018-19 will see its budget rise to ?126bn, rather than the ?124.4bn originally planned. Similarly, it will receive ?900m more than planned in 2019-20 to help it withstand the pressures of coping with the increasing demand for care. However, both are one-off payments, not permanent additions to the NHS’s baseline budget.

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25. How Brexit looms over the Irish border: 'It's the Berlin Wall approaching us'Ср., 22 нояб.[−]

In the communities that straddle the divide between Northern Ireland and the Republic, anxieties about a hard border are becoming very real. Many business owners fear for their livelihoods, while local people warn of a return to the days when IRA smugglers ruled ‘bandit country’

Mervyn Johnston sips his tea while sizing up the pristine-looking 1957 Mini Cooper that has come in for repairs from across the border. As the UK’s historic decision to quit the EU plays out, it doesn’t take much for the softly spoken 78-year-old and five-times rally-driving champion to cast his mind back to the days when customs posts and army checkpoints brought life in the picturesque village of Pettigo to a halt.

“We had about half a dozen incendiary bombs before the big one,” he says, tilting his chin to the other classic-cars garage across the road, now run by his son. “That blew the garage right into the river.”

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26. 'I want good jobs,' said Phil. Almost anything would be better than his | John CraceСр., 22 нояб.[−]

It didn’t matter if he did or didn’t spend the money he didn’t have, the fall-guy chancellor was screwed either way

Freewheelin’ Phil had always enjoyed his morning ritual. After straightening his tie and smoothing down his hair, he’d head to the mirror to blow kisses to himself and whisper: “Looking good, Big Boy.” Only on this day of all days his reflection hadn’t bothered to show up. Freewheelin’ Phil had never felt more alone.

It wasn’t meant to be this way. For a while after the election there had been a sense of release. He’d expected to be out of a job but the prime minister’s failure had given him a reprieve. But now, as he prepared to deliver his budget, the walls were closing in again. The Brexiters were willing him to fail and the remainers no longer much cared whether he stayed or went. The Tories were in meltdown and he was the designated fall guy. It wouldn’t matter if he did or didn’t spend the money he didn’t have. He was screwed either way.

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27. Autumn budget 2017: Hammond announces stamp duty changes and slower growth - as it happenedСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Rolling coverage as chancellor Philip Hammond delivers the 2017 autumn budget

In the spring, around the time Philip Hammond was preparing his first budget, some of those close to him suggested that the March budget was never intended to be that special because he was saving his big, structural changes for the autumn. Since then, the world has moved on somewhat and he came to the Commons today having made little impact with pre-budget announcements and with the expectation bar at what seemed like a Treasury all-time low. It felt as if he would be doing well not mess up.

And actually, by those criteria, he has succeeded. The budget was well received by his colleagues and, so far, nothing has fully unravelled. True, the Office for Budget Responsibility has exposed his main headline-grabbing measure, the abolition of stamp duty for first-time buyers for homes worth up to ?300,000, as a ?600m gimmick that will just push up prices. But, even though it would be nice to live in a world where bad policy always amounts to bad politics, sadly we don’t, and it is hard to see Hammond suffering any penalty for his home owner subsidy (apart from when he realises he has not got ?600m to spend on something else). The Tory tribe (MPs and newspapers) will never complain about a tax cut, and it is not a measure that will be voted down in the Commons. (For example, we can’t even be sure Labour will vote against it.)

The reaction to today’s budget in the financial markets is quite muted.

Although building firms have been hit by the threatened clampdown on land banks, the FTSE 100 actually ended the day up 0.1%. The pound also shrugged off the growth downgrades, it’s up half a cent against the US dollar and flat against the euro.

#UK #OBR productivity miss, miss, miss pic.twitter.com/H8mDgQTLkZ

One lesson from this Budget. Were George Osborne still Chancellor, or PM, he'd almost certainly have had to abandon his surplus rule by now. Those OBR productivity cuts make it essentially impossible

Hammond may have used a little sleight of hand (the reclassification of housing associations being an obvious example) to give himself a little headroom at this juncture.

In practice, however, he appears to have kept the vast majority of his powder dry, cognisant that there may well be a time, as Brexit approaches, when more radical action is merited.

. @vincecable scathing about "desperate" Treasury plans to start selling its ?24bn stake in RBS by March 2019, says would not deliver value for taxpayer.
VC: " @George_Osborne accepted it was utterly wrong to start selling shares before you can recoup basic taxpayer outlay."

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28. Universal credit wait reduced to five weeksСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Tories welcome changes to hardship loans and housing benefit but Labour calls for welfare rollout to be paused and fixed

Universal credit claimants will only have to wait five instead of six weeks for their first benefit payments after Philip Hammond bowed to pressure to ease hardship caused by the new welfare system.

Related: Autumn budget: the day's biggest winners and losers

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29. MPs hog social media as they deny voting animals are not sentientСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Commons vote against transferring EU protocol on animal sentience into UK law was widely misconstrued, insist MPs

MPs have been forced to deny that a Commons vote last week means animals are not recognised in the UK as sentient life forms.

An amendment to the European Union (withdrawal bill to transfer the EU protocol on animal sentience into UK law was defeated by 313 votes to 295 on 15 November, and since then a row has developed as to what the vote meant in practice.

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30. Where does the government get its money, and what does it spend it on?Ср., 22 нояб.[−]

The chancellor’s second budget of the year sets out where Philip Hammond expects the state to get money from in 2018, and how he expects it to be spent. Phillip Inman explains

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31. Labour's Angela Rayner becomes a grandmother at 37Ср., 22 нояб.[−]

Shadow education secretary announces birth of her first grandchild in tweet with hashtag #Grangela

The shadow education secretary, Angela Rayner, has become a grandmother at the age of 37.

The Ashton-under-Lyne MP announced the birth of her first grandchild in a tweet using the hashtag #Grangela.

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32. Corbyn challenges May over Brexit strategy at PMQsСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Labour leader presses PM on issues such as Irish border and immigration rules; May says Labour has no clue on Brexit

Jeremy Corbyn has used prime minister’s questions to challenge Theresa May over what he called the government’s lack of a coherent Brexit strategy.

The Labour leader used each of his questions in a pre-budget PMQs to focus on Brexit, a subject he has largely avoided in recent months, seemingly because Labour’s position on the subject also remains some way from coherent and unified.

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33. Damian Green inquiry to conclude within days after series of interviewsСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Cabinet Office minister battles for political future as investigation into allegations of sexual impropriety nears completion

An inquiry into allegations of impropriety by Theresa May’s de facto deputy Damian Green is expected to conclude within days after a series of interviews.

The political future of the first secretary of state and Cabinet Office minister remains in the balance as the department’s head of propriety and ethics, Sue Gray, deliberates over claims that Green harassed a young Conservative activist and downloaded pornography to a work computer. He denies both allegations.

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34. Kezia Dugdale: I'll donate part of I'm a Celebrity fee to charityСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Scottish MSP admits sums involved are not ‘in any sense small’ as she defends her decision to appear in reality TV show

The former Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale has promised to donate part of her fee from appearing in I’m a Celebrity … Get Me Out of Here to a homeless charity as she defended her decision to appear in the show.

Dugdale rejected complaints from her Labour colleagues at Holyrood that taking part in the ITV reality show was akin to taking a second job, but admitted she would be well paid for it.

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35. We take a peek behind the scenes of #BirdOfTheYear HQ where everyone is in a flap! | First Dog on the MoonСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Previous winners have gone on to fame and fortune - Plucka Duck, Mr Percival and even Brenda the Civil Disobedience Penguin

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36. Ministers back down over human rights to avoid Tory rebellion - as it happenedСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including David Davis’s speech at a Brexit conference, Boris Johnson taking questions in the Commons and the EU withdrawal bill debate

We’re wrapping up the politics live blog for today.

To sum up: ministers have sought to see off a potential rebellion by Conservative MPs that could have brought a first defeat over the EU withdrawal bill by partially backing down on the future status of EU human rights measures in UK law.

A separate Labour amendment, number 336, to retain the existing principles of EU law within domestic law on or after exit day has been defeated by 315 votes to 296 - a majority of 19.

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37. Government backs down over EU human rights to avoid risk of defeatСр., 22 нояб.[−]

Tories agree to work with rebel MP Dominic Grieve over keeping rights under EU law after Brexit

Ministers have sought to see off a potential rebellion by Conservative MPs that could have brought a first defeat over the EU withdrawal bill by partially backing down on the future status of EU human rights measures in UK law.

Following another day of debate about the bill, which seeks to transpose EU statute into UK law post-Brexit, the government faced possible defeat over amendments intended to maintain the scope of the EU charter on fundamental rights.

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38. UK confident Irish border will not stop progress of Brexit talksВт., 21 нояб.[−]

But view of many in EU27 is that Britain leaving single market and customs union makes hard border inevitable – which Ireland will not accept

Downing Street still believes the Irish border problem can be resolved by December, despite Dublin’s threat to veto Brexit trade talks over the issue regardless of Theresa May’s ?40bn divorce offer.

Ireland fired a warning shot on Tuesday by suggesting May’s enhanced financial offer to the EU was not enough on its own to secure the trade talks sought by the UK without guarantees that Brexit will not lead to a hard border.

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39. Britain’s diminished role after the Brexit vote | LettersВт., 21 нояб.[−]
Alex Orr, Elaine Bagshaw, Peter Lyth and others look at Britian’s future after Brexit

In recent days the UK’s standing in the world has further diminished as the impacts of Brexit become more tangible. Earlier this week the relocation of two EU agencies currently based in London was announced. The European Medicines Agency will move to Amsterdam, while the European Banking Authority will be lost to Paris, which narrowly pipped Dublin to host this prestigious organisation ( London loses EU agencies to Paris and Amsterdam in Brexit relocation, 21 November). Between them, the two agencies employ 1,150 people, as well as attracting thousands of visiting researchers and staff members to London. This is despite Brexit secretary David Davis previously voicing his hope that the agencies could remain in London, or at least form part of the negotiations. To add insult to injury, the UK will have to pay for the relocation.

In addition, the UK has withdrawn its candidate from election to the UN international court of justice ( Report, 21 November). Britain will not have a judge on the UN’s most powerful court for the first time in its 71-year history. Last week, after five rounds of voting by the security council and the general assembly in New York, four judges from Brazil, Lebanon, France and Somalia were chosen for the bench ahead of the UK’s candidate, Christopher Greenwood. The UK’s failure to guarantee a place on the court of an organisation it helped to found is clearly a further sign of its increasing irrelevance on the world stage following the decision to leave the EU. As the UK turns inwards following the Brexit vote, it is hardly a surprise that it is no longer able to command the global influence it once did.
Alex Orr
Edinburgh

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40. Civil servants bordering on clueless over Brexit | John CraceВт., 21 нояб.[−]

MPs left scratching their heads after facing big-hitters from the Home Office, the UK Border Force, HMRC and Defra

It started badly and got steadily worse. Labour MP Meg Hillier opened the public accounts committee session on the state of UK borders after Brexit by asking Patsy Wilkinson, the second most senior civil servant at the Home Office, how many different digital services programme directors for the UK Border Force there had been recently.

“Two or three,” said Wilkinson hesitantly.

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41. London loses EU agencies to Paris and Amsterdam in Brexit relocationПн., 20 нояб.[−]

Paris takes European Banking Authority and European Medicines Agency goes to Amsterdam as EU’s chief negotiator mocks Theresa May’s ‘Brexit means Brexit’ stance

London is losing the European Medicines Agency to Amsterdam and the European Banking Authority to Paris, in one of the first concrete signs of Brexit as the UK prepares to leave the European Union.

The two cities won the agencies after tie breaks that saw the winner selected by drawing lots from a large goldfish-style bowl.

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42. Budget 2017: UK to launch self-driving cars on British roads by 2021Вс., 19 нояб.[−]

Embattled chancellor will sweep away regulation to allow testing of cars and put up ?1bn for tech

Driverless cars will be on Britain’s roads by 2021 as a result of sweeping regulatory reforms that will put the UK in the forefront of a post-Brexit technological revolution, Chancellor Philip Hammond will say this week. In his budget on Wednesday Hammond will allow driverless cars to be tested without any human operator inside or outside the car, and without the legal constraints and rules that apply in many other EU nations, and much of the US.

The move – welcomed by the UK motor industry – is part of an attempt by Hammond and the Treasury to project a more upbeat message about the prospects for the UK economy after Brexit, and focus on opportunities as well as the risks. Carmakers have warned that they may have to move at least some production abroad if there is no deal to keep Britain inside the EU single market and customs union, at least for a two-year transition period.

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43. David Davis and the Brexit monster – cartoonВс., 19 нояб.[−]

Chris Riddell on the troubles lurking beneath Britain’s bed

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44. Britain's housing crisis and the Brexit bill – Politics Weekly podcastСр., 15 нояб.[−]

Anushka Asthana is joined by Nick Boles MP, Dawn Foster and Ian Mulheirn to discuss the UK’s housing crisis and the return to the Commons of the EU withdrawal bill. Plus Labour MP Tulip Siddiq on her constituent Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe who is in prison in Iran

Last month, the prime minister vowed to fix Britain’s broken housing market. So with homelessness on the rise, private rents soaring and young people frozen out of the mortgage market, what would a solution look like?

Joining Anushka Asthana this week are Shelter’s Steve Akehurst, Conservative MP Nick Boles, commentator Dawn Foster and Ian Mulheirn of Oxford Economics.

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45. Jeremy Corbyn says he would vote remain in a second EU referendumЧт., 12 окт.[−]

Labour leader reveals position as he criticises government’s ‘shocking’ lack of progress in Brexit discussions


Jeremy Corbyn has said he would vote to remain in the EU in the event of another referendum, as he criticised the government for its “shocking” lack of progress in the Brexit talks.

The Labour leader revealed his position during a visit to Shipley in West Yorkshire, just days after Theresa May said she could not answer the question because she would have to weigh up the evidence again.

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46. Where have all the young Tories gone?Пн., 02 окт.[−]

Young people have deserted the Conservative party, as they think it is on the side of homeowners and the rich. Is a cap on tuition fees really going to draw in the next generation of Tory boys?

Name: Young Tories.

Age: 18 to 29.

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47. The Snap: Theresa May – still prime minister, but for how long?Сб., 10 июня[−]

Tories (and press) turn on May … Labour wins in Kensington …most diverse parliament ever … and can DUP deal survive questions over hardline beliefs?

Here we are, the morning after the morning after, with Theresa May still in No 10, still prime minister and still without a majority.

Related: General election 2017: chastened Theresa May to name her team – live

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48. London must remain open to the worldВт., 31 янв.[−]

The capital should have its own migration system to help it to help Britain survive leaving the EU

There are always exceptions. Since the nation voted to leave the European Union, the mayor of its capital city, Sadiq Khan, has declared that “ London Is Open”, but he wouldn’t mind it being closed to Donald Trump. Hundreds of thousands of Londoners sympathise, judging by the map of signatories of the petition to stop the US president paying a state visit and making life difficult for the Queen.

This isn’t typical behaviour. In general, the capital welcomes foreigners, including those who, unlike Trump, plan to stick around and do something useful. About two million of the city’s work force of five million were born overseas, of which at least half come from elsewhere in the EU. London-haters find this frightening, a foretaste of foreignness eating the green and pleasant land. They hope Brexit will stem the alien tide, buttressing a fading Britannia of yore. They may not have yet grasped how damaging for them a cut in incomers from overseas could be.

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49. Tony Blair should face trial over Iraq war, says Desmond TutuВс., 02 сент. 2012[−]
Anti-apartheid hero attacks former prime minister over 'double standards on war crimes'

Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called for Tony Blair and George Bush to be hauled before the international criminal court in The Hague and delivered a damning critique of the physical and moral devastation caused by the Iraq war.

Tutu, a Nobel peace prize winner and hero of the anti-apartheid movement, accuses the former British and US leaders of lying about weapons of mass destruction and says the invasion left the world more destabilised and divided "than any other conflict in history".

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50. Comment: Hague is not the place to try MilosevicЧт., 02 авг. 2001[−]
The tribunal is effectively the legal arm of Nato in the Balkans

The man long-reviled as the Butcher of Belgrade - or even a quasi-Nazi dictator, despite his regular election victories - has already been convicted in the court of western public opinion, not only for the war crimes charges he now faces, but for a decade of slaughter in the Balkans.

Shamelessly bought with $1.3bn of aid for a country ravaged by sanctions and Nato bombing, Milosevic's extradition had to be forced through by decree, in defiance of Yugoslavia's constitutional court, by a government which knew it stood no chance of getting the decision through parliament.

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